Sports Facility Management.4390406
4 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Zachary Culp
Scoop.it!

NFL, MLB stadium security evolves 10 years after Sept. 11, 2001 - More Sports - SI.com

NFL, MLB stadium security evolves 10 years after Sept. 11, 2001 - More Sports - SI.com | Sports Facility Management.4390406 | Scoop.it
As the St. Louis Cardinals designed new Busch Stadium early in the 2000s, the September 11 attacks remained in their minds.
more...
Tricia's curator insight, May 26, 2013 12:48 PM

So much has changed in the quality of security all over the country in light of terroist attacks over the last century. Security in sports facilities is no exception.

Joshua Evans's curator insight, January 17, 2014 10:13 AM

Security can never be thorough enough. At an event like a game, there are thousands of potential victims if a terrorist attack happens. Always think security. 

Jason Cain's curator insight, March 22, 2014 10:47 PM

Security has been as important as the teams that are playing since the 9/11 attacks on the United States. It is important to keep everyone safe especially in large crowds where attacks would involve a lot of people at one time. 

Rescooped by Zachary Culp from Sports Facility Management. 4302728
Scoop.it!

Sports Facilities Jobs | Operations, Management, Stadium Security

Sports Facilities Jobs | Operations, Management, Stadium Security | Sports Facility Management.4390406 | Scoop.it
Get close to the action - work in or manage sports facilities. Learn about jobs at sports stadiums and arenas - from security jobs to operations positions.

Via Kyle Hostetler
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Zachary Culp from View * Engage * Discuss
Scoop.it!

Should Sports Teams Receive Tax Breaks?

Should Sports Teams Receive Tax Breaks? | Sports Facility Management.4390406 | Scoop.it
Here are some of the costs, pros and cons of sports teams receiving tax breaks. 

 

In a very general sense, the question of tax breaks for sports teams falls under the category of whether or not subsidies are desirable. From an economic perspective on subsidies, some could say that almost all of them create suboptimal outcomes. This is because under normal market conditions market forces move automatically towards allocative efficiency. Subsidies distort the ability of markets to correctly allocate resources because they provide an incentive to continue the subsidized behavior, even when it is not profitable or productive to do so.

 

Why Subsidies Are Useful
The counterargument is that subsidies are useful for this very reason. They allow government to shape economic outcomes toward desired policy objectives. For example, the money used to fund alternative energy sources. So although the subsidy is creating a less than optimal use of resources, people believe that is balanced by the development of technology that might not have otherwise been built until much later, if at all. Another reason people champion subsidies is to protect jobs or create growth. However, the job market is subject to the same economic forces as any other. By creating subsidies in unproductive industries people remain in jobs that are also unproductive; this makes society worse off. In the case of sports teams, the most commonly cited reason for subsidies is that it creates jobs and improves revenues. Yet there have been studies that conclude that this is not always the case.

 

Not All Need Tax Breaks
Most sports teams are actually quite profitable and do not actually require tax breaks to remain competitive. Examples of the types of subsidies sports teams regularly enjoy include: tax-deductible ticket sales (including on luxury suites), reduction of taxes on revenue via direct tax credits and sweet-heart deals on new facilities. What this means is that corporations, and even individuals, can deduct a portion of what they spend on tickets in a similar manner as donating to a charity. In the case of new stadiums, the burden of building and operating arenas gets pushed onto the taxpayer while owners reap the related revenues. Unfortunately, due to the secretive nature of professional teams, most financial information is inaccessible thus preventing the public from accurately gauging the level of financial support these franchises receive.

 

However, let us be fair and consider the case where sports teams are legitimately struggling and only government aid can keep them afloat. This hearkens back to the beginning of this piece and the discussion on whether or not it is believed that subsidies are useful. Insofar as civic pride is concerned, maybe it is considered appropriate to prop up a flailing team. People have an emotional connection to their sports teams. They buy tickets to games, purchase merchandise and follow every story about their chosen champions. Despite this, only a very small portion of the population (20%) thinks that tax breaks for sports teams is good policy.

 

The intuition for this is that if a sports team is failing it is because it is poorly run and is spending itself into a hole, or the fans do not support it with enough revenue to continue. Either way, this is not an enterprise that should be having public money thrown at it. Perhaps the largest segment of government support goes toward the construction of stadiums. Fancy new stadiums attract fans and sports teams alike.

 

Cities often will use the promise of a new stadium to entice teams to relocate. Is this a good investment on behalf of the public? Almost all economists and independent development specialists conclude that the rate of return on these projects is less than what could be had on alternative projects, with some sports contracts failing significantly. Further, those cities that invested heavily in sports stadiums have experienced, on average, slower income growth compared to their peers who chose otherwise.

 

The Bottom Line
There is no silver lining. The public does not support deluxe treatments for sports teams in the form of tax breaks, the data does not support tax breaks for sports teams and commonly accepted economic theory does not support tax breaks for sports teams either. This leaves fans and citizens paying double as both their taxes and discretionary income go towards profitable franchises instead of schools and roads. The only people who benefit from such activity are those who own, operate and work for sports franchises. As Norman Braman, former owner of the NFL's Philadelphia Eagles, put it: "the taxpayers are a bunch of suckers."


Via TheIWC_AJA
more...
Vinnie's curator insight, February 17, 2015 9:08 PM

Basic breakdown of public subsidy benefits for sports teams.

Bryant Tucker's curator insight, July 24, 6:10 PM
This is a great article that gives an understanding of both the good and bad of the tax breaks, as well as the notion that some teams are very profitable and could afford their own building efforts.
Rescooped by Zachary Culp from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
Scoop.it!

Minnesota Vikings, Juhl Wind Score a Huge Renewable Energy Touchdown | CleanTechnica

Minnesota Vikings, Juhl Wind Score a Huge Renewable Energy Touchdown | CleanTechnica | Sports Facility Management.4390406 | Scoop.it

Juhl Wind Inc, well-known for its commitment to community wind power, is teaming up with the Minnesota Vikings to tackle clean energy supply at Viking home games this NFL season.

 

Juhl will supply renewable energy credits (RECs) from one of their wind energy plants. This will counteract the energy consumed at games this year at the Mall of America Metrodome in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

 

The total amount of energy ‘provided’ by Juhl during this football year will hit 520,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh), cutting 507,520 pounds of carbon emissions.

 

“The renewable energy produced will offset all the electricity used throughout Mall of America Field — from the concession stands and ticket offices, to the field lighting and scoreboards making the Vikings one of the only NFL teams to play in a 100% green-powered facility during the entire 2012-2013 season,” said President of Jul Wind Inc, Corey Juhl, in a statement.

 

Minnesota Vikings officials are hoping this encourages Minnesota residents to move towards clean energy.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Zachary Culp from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
Scoop.it!

The Superdome Scores a Touchdown for Energy Efficiency | The Energy Collective

The Superdome Scores a Touchdown for Energy Efficiency | The Energy Collective | Sports Facility Management.4390406 | Scoop.it

Get those chicken wings ready!  Super Bowl XLVII is coming up faster than a knife fight in a phone booth.  This year, the Baltimore Ravens will take on the San Francisco 49ers at the newly renovated Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana.  The lucky fans attending the game are in for a treat.  With $336 million worth of renovations, the Superdome is more modern, luxurious, and energy efficient than ever.

 

This massive update is one of the biggest stadium reconstruction projects ever attempted in the U.S.  Expanding the plaza concourse, adding concession stands and restrooms, making space for 3,100 new seats, upgrading the locker room and press box, and constructing two premium bunker club lounges were all part of this undertaking.  As if this wasn’t enough, new construction has turned the Superdome into an energy efficient playground.

 

Consuming approximately 4,600 MW of electricity, the Superdome and its supporting facilities are going to great lengths to be resourceful with the energy it requires.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
Nicholas T Geisinger's curator insight, August 16, 2013 12:13 PM

Eco-Friendly Stadiums improving communities world wide.

Rescooped by Zachary Culp from Sports Facility Management_4167405
Scoop.it!

Crisis Management and Leadership Online Video Training

Crisis Management and Leadership Online Video Training | Sports Facility Management.4390406 | Scoop.it
Crisis Management and Leadership Online Video Training by Tony Ridiey contains hours of professional, experienced tutorials for beginners and seasoned professionals alike to assist in crisis management planning, management, education and improve...

Via Nickesha Bailey
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Zachary Culp from The Journal of Sports Facility Management
Scoop.it!

Creating an Annual Marketing Plan for Your Sports Facility | Sports ...

Creating an Annual Marketing Plan for Your Sports Facility: Follow these steps to stay ahead of the game and keep your staff accountable. ... Our Sponsors. Sports Facility Management Software Leader in Performance ...

Via Anthony Page
more...
Thomas Gerdes's curator insight, February 19, 2015 10:49 AM

This article explains exactly what the title says it does.

Sharone Petty's curator insight, April 25, 2015 3:42 AM

This is agreat article on making a plan for sport's facilities. Without planning you will fail.

Scooped by Zachary Culp
Scoop.it!

A nuts-and-bolts guide to managing change

A nuts-and-bolts guide to managing change | Sports Facility Management.4390406 | Scoop.it
Consultant Phil Buckley breaks down the process into four phases, from identifying what needs to be done to making change stick (“@Globe_Careers: A nuts-and-bolts guide to managing change http://t.co/yJeMHbaUsf...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Zachary Culp from Tolero Solutions: Organizational Improvement
Scoop.it!

3 Management Lessons From Pro Sports

3 Management Lessons From Pro Sports | Sports Facility Management.4390406 | Scoop.it
Legendary football coach Vince Lombardi said that running a football team is no different than running a business. Here's why.

Via Scott Span, MSOD
more...
Thomas Gerdes's curator insight, February 19, 2015 11:02 AM

This article talks about 3 major lessons any management team can use to enhance their business or whatever it is they manage.

Gary McKoy's curator insight, March 8, 2015 10:59 PM

The three steps in improving and developing an all star team professionally through management: 1. Recruit Differently 2. Manage Your Roster 3. Admit to your Mistakes

David Foster's curator insight, April 27, 2015 10:08 AM

3 great guidelines to beginning or sustaining a great management environment!

Rescooped by Zachary Culp from Texas Sports Facility Management Magazine
Scoop.it!

Sports subsidies in Texas: lotsa bucks, little bang

Sports subsidies in Texas: lotsa bucks, little bang | Sports Facility Management.4390406 | Scoop.it
Promoters routinely hype the economic impact of sports events to get public subsidies. But in Texas, no one follows up to see if the promised revenues materialize.

Via Brad Schlather
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Zachary Culp from Applied Web New York News
Scoop.it!

NYC bans big, sugary drinks at eateries, theaters | Press & Sun Bulletin

NYC bans big, sugary drinks at eateries, theaters | Press & Sun Bulletin | Sports Facility Management.4390406 | Scoop.it

New York City's Board of Health opened up a new, experimental front in the war on obesity Thursday, passing a rule banning sales of big sodas and other sugary drinks at restaurants, concession stands and other eateries.


Via Applied Web
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Zachary Culp from Bicol Coconuts
Scoop.it!

Coconut Oil: From Villain to Health Food: A Good Appetite

Coconut Oil: From Villain to Health Food: A Good Appetite | Sports Facility Management.4390406 | Scoop.it

After gaining a bad reputation at theater concession stands in the ’90s, coconut oil is back.


Via Dave ( Silverbackpacker )
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Zachary Culp from Sports Facility Management_4167405
Scoop.it!

Risk Management Can Stimulate, Rather than Deter, Innovation - Forbes

Risk Management Can Stimulate, Rather than Deter, Innovation - Forbes | Sports Facility Management.4390406 | Scoop.it
Innovation and risk management seemingly do not naturally go hand-in-hand in many peoples’ minds - although we would argue that it should.

Via Nickesha Bailey
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Zachary Culp from Sports Facility Management -Crowd management
Scoop.it!

Case Studies in Crowd Management, Security and Business ...

Case Studies in Crowd Management, Security and Business ... | Sports Facility Management.4390406 | Scoop.it
The International Centre for Crowd Management and Security Studies is an institution based in High Wycombe, UK. The Centre is part of Buckinghamshire New University and offers a range of unique academic courses for ...

Via Vonda K Dennis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Zachary Culp from Sports Facility Management 4099916
Scoop.it!

Ideas for Holiday Specials at Sports Facilities

Here are a few ideas to promote your sports facility this holiday season. ... Our Sponsors. Sports Facility Management Software Leader in Performance Enhancement Contact Us Marketing Toolbox ...

Via Adam White
more...
Justin Tillinghast's curator insight, July 17, 2013 7:27 PM

Advertising ideas for holiday specials

Becky Kelly's curator insight, August 6, 2013 3:04 AM

This website offers ideas for promotion of your sports facility to draw consumers.

Kenneth Hadden Miller's curator insight, April 23, 2015 4:52 AM

Some outstanding ideas on how to help your facility make more money!  As the manager of a facility, you need to be creative and think outside the box to help increase revenue!