Sports Ethics: Harrison, J.
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NHL teams take advantage of compliance buyouts | SI.com

NHL teams take advantage of compliance buyouts | SI.com | Sports Ethics: Harrison, J. | Scoop.it
The compliance buyout is the giant eraser that NHL teams have at their disposal to smudge those mistakes that didn't really happen.
Jason Harrison's insight:

This is a topic near and dear to my heart.

 

As an NHL fan (the NBA also has a similar practice), it's strange to me that with NHL teams supposedly struggling financially, that you would then give them another option to leverage even more money into growing player contracts.

 

To summarize, each team receives two compliance buyouts that they can use this year or next to essentially "terminate" the contract of a player on their roster. The typical use is to eradicate ridiculous contracts given out to former stars who are now on the decline - basically bad investments - and they then re-invest that money in new, younger players.

 

That's not the entire story, however. The compliance buyout still requires the team pay out the remainder of the contract...only now they can do so at a much reduced rate for a much extended term. Say you owe a guy 5 years, 15 million...you would probably then pay him 1 million a year over 15 years, for example. 

 

This leads me to my point; in a league that is growing, yet that still has several struggling franchises, what sense does this make? They had a lockout and labor negotiations because player salaries had grown too large and NHL GM's were spending more money than they could earn. Now we give them another tool to spend even more money? Seems ridiculous and irresponsible to me.

 

On top of that, there's the ethical implications of the contract amnesty. "Yes, George, I know I signed a contract to pay you three million a year for five years, however your skills declined so now you'll only get one million a year. Hope you weren't counting on that money." It's honestly pretty shady in a number of ways, and I thought it was an interesting addition to this collection of stories.

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In Stadium Building Spree, U.S. Taxpayers Lose $4 Billion

In Stadium Building Spree, U.S. Taxpayers Lose $4 Billion | Sports Ethics: Harrison, J. | Scoop.it
New York Giants fans will cheer on their team against the Dallas Cowboys at tonight’s National Football League opener in New Jersey. At tax time, they’ll help pay for the opponents’ $1.2 billion home field in Texas.
Jason Harrison's insight:

This article details the massive price taxpayers have paid to keep teams local. You know, paying the dime so that a multi-millionaire (and occasional billionaire) won't have to, or won't have to invest too firmly.

 

Gotta love ethics.

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Alabama booster files ethics complaint over public officials buying football tickets without donations

Alabama booster files ethics complaint over public officials buying football tickets without donations | Sports Ethics: Harrison, J. | Scoop.it
Alabama Ethics Commission says state law allows universities to determine who they sell tickets to without donations.
Jason Harrison's insight:

This is another example of administrators overlooking the ethical duties of their job in order to appease people or corporations that can in some way mutually benefit them. In this case, the regular every day ticket holder is at a disadvantage in both the available supply of tickets as well as the ridiculous costs associated with them due to there being a limited demand.

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Bilas Shames NCAA into Leaving Jersey Biz

Bilas Shames NCAA into Leaving Jersey Biz | Sports Ethics: Harrison, J. | Scoop.it
The NCAA has been vanquished, taken down by the bulging Twitter muscle and gritty social media might of ESPN's Jay Bilas ...
Jason Harrison's insight:

This is an example of a "league entity" behaving underhandedly and unethically in the course of policing it's own constituents. In this article, it is found out that while college athletes may not profit from their own image, jerseys, autographs, or other myriad of ways that famous people can receive money, it is still cool for league to continue to make a killing doing so at their expense.


The NCAA proclaimed that it did not profit directly off the images of it's players, however Jay Bilas proved them wrong by searching for prominent players jerseys on the NCAA official store and finding exact matches. This is true hypocrisy and leadership and a major case of unethical behavior, not withstanding the rest of the NCAA governing rules, which are also in question currently.

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Vengeance, punishment and ethics | NYU Program on Sports ...

Vengeance, punishment and ethics | NYU Program on Sports ... | Sports Ethics: Harrison, J. | Scoop.it
By Arthur Caplan. About 70% of the players in the NFL are African American. Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver and special teams player Riley Cooper's racist outburst has already alienated some of his teammates ...
Jason Harrison's insight:

This is an interesting article from the perspective of an administrator or other sports manager. On the one hand, the league does not necessarily have a rule against a player saying something such as what Riley Cooper said...on the other, the team clearly has clauses in every players contract allowing them to terminate the contract for actions such as the one Mr. Cooper took.

 

The Eagles decided to pass on releasing Mr. Cooper and just fine him, and the league decided to pass on doling out any discipline whatsoever. The problem now becomes two-fold for Eagles management. Does their slap on the wrist foster a situation where Chip Kelly and the rest of the management staff will be seen as a pushover? Does their lack of reaction to Riley Cooper's racism, along with allowing him to still stand on their sideline, expose him to the danger of retribution from vengeful opposing players?

 

As I said, it's an interesting question for management. I believe he should have been released. Even folks who don't believe he should have been released can clearly see he is now set up to take a possible serious injury in an act of retribution on the field, which is another reason for his immediate release to occur.

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FOUL PLAY: Five Cities That Want Taxpayer Money To Finance Pro Sports Stadium Boondoggles

FOUL PLAY: Five Cities That Want Taxpayer Money To Finance Pro Sports Stadium Boondoggles | Sports Ethics: Harrison, J. | Scoop.it
Jason Harrison's insight:

The ultimate in underhanded administrative tactics in sports; the one where the owners and management appeal to a city, county, or state to help them pay for a new stadium for the team or they are out of there.

 

Nevermind the fact that it adds to the bottom line of the CEO, and that unless you tie up all the loose ends he can still bolt himself and sell to another owner who may not be so agreeable.

 

Poor Minneapolis, and Minnesota as a state in general, have been fleeced in this way by college football, baseball, hockey, the NBA, and now the NFL as well. Why should folks pay for a stadium for your team that is worth hundreds of millions of dollars? Use your own money, bub.

 

This is about as ethically and morally abhorrent as it gets in the sports world. We complain so much about PEDs, but very little is said about the teams fleecing their own fans.

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‘Anti-doping puritanism is killing sport’ | Tim Black | spiked

‘Anti-doping puritanism is killing sport’ | Tim Black | spiked | Sports Ethics: Harrison, J. | Scoop.it
Jason Harrison's insight:

In this article we have a very interesting take: an ethics professor says we should chill out about doping and PED use. The primary point here, for me, is that the crusade (and failure) against PEDs has resulted in everyone who does well being under suspicion, which is terrible for both the sport and the fans. 

 

This raises the point that league administrators and team administration should consider an all or nothing approach. They either need to be able to guarantee that all cheaters will be caught, or will face an extremely hefty or permanent banning, or they need to back off the fight until such a time when they can do that. As it stands, players like the Baltimore Oriole's Chris Davis who is having a breakout season this year in batting average and home runs, will continue to be guilty until proven innocent.

 

Unfortunately, it's impossible to prove innocence in this day and age. Only guilt.

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Oklahoma City Barons: General Manager Bill Scott is Barons' version of Sam Presti

Oklahoma City Barons: General Manager Bill Scott is Barons' version of Sam Presti | Sports Ethics: Harrison, J. | Scoop.it
Like the Thunder general manager, the Barons' GM also got his opportunity at a young age after paying his dues. Wearing black rimmed glasses, Scott even looks a little like Presti. And like Presti, Scott is the GM of a model, winning franchise.
Jason Harrison's insight:

I included this article to offset all of the negative articles. This is a textbook example of a team's general manager doing things the right way. The team is succeeding, the community is happy, and his parent NHL team is appreciative of his and his fellow administrators efforts in helping build their team.

 

While you could probably file this under "moral" more than "ethical", I feel that Bill Scott (and to a larger degree Sam Presti who is referenced here) are both cutting edge front end members of sports franchises who perform their duties the right way.

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