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Rescooped by Daniel Cavar from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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Central coach Ndedi teaches worldwide language of soccer : GazPrepSports - High School Sports

Central coach Ndedi teaches worldwide language of soccer : GazPrepSports - High School Sports | Sports Ethics: Cavar, D. | Scoop.it
Adjusting to life in Montana hasn’t always been easy for Didier Ndedi.

How could it be? Ndedi, a native of the west-central African country of Cameroon, has been forced to overcome a language barrier, cultural differences and a distinct climate change since he came to the United States.

But the basics of soccer are the same anywhere in the world. So when Ndedi was hired to become the boys soccer coach at Billings Central, it felt right.

“It’s not easy. Especially in Montana,” said Ndedi, who played professionally in Cameroon and other places in Europe and Southeast Asia. “It’s very cold. Because I’ve been in Germany, I have an idea of cold, but it’s still difficult.

“But, man, we’re human and we have to live in this world. So we have to adjust and make it work.”

Making it work has been Ndedi’s specialty with the Rams this year. The first-year coach has guided Central to a 12-1-0 record and a spot in the Class A state semifinals, where it will host Stevensville Saturday at Wendy’s Field on the campus of Rocky Mountain College.

Not knowing what to expect early on, the Rams thoroughly responded to Ndedi’s coaching style, which stresses a sound technical game and all-around teamwork.

“The kids are amazing,” Ndedi said, a deep accent rolling off his tongue. “They listen a lot. And the most I’m happy about is that they’re very, very respectful. They’re very, very careful about what they’re saying and very respectful of each other. They never complain in the game.

“They just want to have fun, that’s what I did understand with them.”

Read more: http://billingsgazette.com/sports/high-school/soccer/central-coach-ndedi-teaches-worldwide-language-of-soccer/article_7c076619-0e0c-5514-8fc1-4946a61b4ea7.html#ixzz29rArsuDJ


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Arkady Kostochka's comment, August 11, 12:17 PM
This course looks at how OODA loops can be applied to soccer. OODA loops is a decision/action model widely used in the military and by police and first responders. It is ideally suited for the complex, adversarial nature of soccer. Applying these basic ideas is the start of getting, and staying, ahead of your opponent. https://coursmos.com/course/ooda-loops-in-soccer?utm_source=seedcnv&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=sd&utm_content=17
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Rescooped by Daniel Cavar from Coaching and Sports Ethics: Small, J
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Has money ruined ethics in sports? - SKNVibes.com

Has money ruined ethics in sports? - SKNVibes.com | Sports Ethics: Cavar, D. | Scoop.it
SKNVibes.comHas money ruined ethics in sports?SKNVibes.comBASSETERRE, St.

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Saagar Varma's curator insight, October 30, 2013 10:14 AM

This article talks about how money, power, and greed has changed how athletes act and perform on and off the field. This article ties into class discussions we have had  of ethical issues and also external social problems such as economic, technological, wages, labor unions, and stability of a sporting organization. The relationship this article has with ethics is how money hungry a lot of athletes are and how the media boosts their value and so their performance and attitude are affected in comparison to those athletes of the past.

Rescooped by Daniel Cavar from Sports and Performance Psychology
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Psychology of Coaching Your Own Child

Psychology of Coaching Your Own Child | Sports Ethics: Cavar, D. | Scoop.it

The psychology of coaching youth sports certainly changes when one’s own child is part of the team. Keeping a good, solid relationship comes by doing this.


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Rescooped by Daniel Cavar from Sports and Performance Psychology
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Sports Visualization | Sport Psychology and Life Coaching

Sports Visualization | Sport Psychology and Life Coaching | Sports Ethics: Cavar, D. | Scoop.it
Sport Psychology has developed our understanding in the use of sports visualization. Understand how to master these skills to maximise performance.

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Ethics Report: North Miami Mayor Exploited Position to Use City-Owned Soccer Fields for Free

Ethics Report: North Miami Mayor Exploited Position to Use City-Owned Soccer Fields for Free | Sports Ethics: Cavar, D. | Scoop.it

North Miami Mayor Andre Pierre exploited his position to avoid paying rental fees at a municipal athletic field used by his soccer club, according to a report released Tuesday by the Miami-Dade Commission on Ethics and Public Trust.

 

According to the report, Pierre's group, the North Miami Taxpayers Soccer Club, used the fields more than 100 times without paying between October 2009 and January 2012.

 

An NBC 6 South Florida investigation earlier this year found the loss of fees for the use of the stadium equaled around $40,000.

 

Pierre used the field for free even though a resolution unanimously passed by the North Miami City Council in April 2010 limits fee waivers to certain qualified organizations for just one no-cost use per year, the ethics commission said...


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Arkady Kostochka's comment, August 11, 12:08 PM
This course looks at how OODA loops can be applied to soccer. OODA loops is a decision/action model widely used in the military and by police and first responders. It is ideally suited for the complex, adversarial nature of soccer. Applying these basic ideas is the start of getting, and staying, ahead of your opponent. https://coursmos.com/course/ooda-loops-in-soccer?utm_source=seedcnv&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=sd&utm_content=17
Rescooped by Daniel Cavar from Sports
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Why Every American Should Be a Soccer Fan Right Now - Front Page Buzz

Why Every American Should Be a Soccer Fan Right Now - Front Page Buzz | Sports Ethics: Cavar, D. | Scoop.it
Though researchers claim that soccer is the most popular sport in the world, for some reason, it has yet to really catch on here in the States. But with our ...

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Arkady Kostochka's comment, August 11, 1:12 PM
This course looks at how OODA loops can be applied to soccer. OODA loops is a decision/action model widely used in the military and by police and first responders. It is ideally suited for the complex, adversarial nature of soccer. Applying these basic ideas is the start of getting, and staying, ahead of your opponent. https://coursmos.com/course/ooda-loops-in-soccer?utm_source=seedcnv&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=sd&utm_content=17
Rescooped by Daniel Cavar from Sports Ethics
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COACHING ETHICS - Remembering what 's important!

COACHING ETHICS - Remembering what 's important! | Sports Ethics: Cavar, D. | Scoop.it
Coaching Ethics - Coach Long covers the importance of correctly prioritizing what is really important when coaching youth sports. Learn to be a role model for your young kids.

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Darryl Lee Paulus's curator insight, July 16, 2013 8:31 PM

Many coaches get wrapped up in winning that they forget what is really important. There is so much more to the game besides winning and losing.

Joshua Evans's curator insight, January 17, 8:36 PM

coaching is a very important job and coaches need to remember to focus on more than winning and losing, but focus on developing an athlete. A coach is a teacher first. 

shawn O'Connell's curator insight, September 20, 6:27 PM

Becoming a role model is important for young kids. If you constantly do the right thing and always have the correct attitude towards other players, teams and parents kids pick up on that and it could take them a long way! So always be positive and be a great role model!

Rescooped by Daniel Cavar from JAPAN, as I see it
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Japan's female Olympic judokas say coaches beat them

Japan's female Olympic judokas say coaches beat them | Sports Ethics: Cavar, D. | Scoop.it

Japan’s female Olympic judo athletes were beaten with bamboo swords and slapped by their coaches, officials said Wednesday.

A 15-strong group of judokas complained to the Japanese Olympic Committee (JOC) last month that they had been subjected to physical punishment by the team’s head coach, Ryuji Sonoda.

The group, which included athletes who took part in the London Olympics, says Sonoda routinely abused them, slapping them in the face and hitting them with thick wooden swords, like those used in the Japanese martial art of kendo.

They also complained that some were forced to compete in matches while injured, reports said.

“We have asked the All Japan Judo Federation (AJJF) to investigate the case and improve their methods if the charges are true,” a JOC official said.

AJJF head Koshi Onozawa said the federation had admonished Sonoda and other coaches, who had admitted several of the allegations.

“We received information that Mr Sonoda, the head coach of the female national team, might have been physically bullying athletes,” Onozawa told a news conference in Tokyo.

“Our executive office took this seriously and questioned both him and athletes, discovering the charges were largely true,” Onozawa said.

The AJJF told Sonoda and other coaches that they must change their ways and “will face a harsher punishment if a similar incident happens in the future,” he added.

Kyodo News said Sonoda did not deny the allegations when asked by reporters. “Until now I have been doing things the way I saw fit, but I will fix the things that need fixing,” it quoted him as saying.

A spokesman for the Tokyo Metropolitan Police said: “We are trying to confirm the facts around this issue, including questioning relevant people.”

Japan’s women returned from London with one gold, one silver and one bronze medal in judo, well below their haul from the 2008 Beijing Games.

JOC secretary general Noriyuki Ichihara told reporters the matter was not closed.

Asked if the AJJF’s decision to keep Sonoda as head coach was appropriate, Ichihara said: “We want to see if the trust between athletes and coaches is still there or if there is a way to rebuild that trust,” adding the AJJF has authority to appoint coaches.

The case comes weeks after a Japanese high school student killed himself after repeated physical abuse from his basketball coach, an incident that has provoked national hand-wringing over the way children are disciplined.

Under a law dating from 1947, teachers are not permitted to physically discipline their charges. However, there are no statutory penalties for the minority of teachers who do so.

It is not the first time Japan’s sporting world has been rocked by violence.

In 2007, a trainee sumo wrestler died after a hazing incident revealed a shocking level of punishment for would-be champions.

Referring to Wednesday’s claims, education and sports minister Hakubun Shimomura told reporters a rethink was required.

“It is time for Japan to change the idea that use of violence in sports including physical discipline is a valid way of coaching,” he said.

Tomohiro Noguchi, a specialist in sport at Nihon University, said it was quite surprising that this kind of thing was happening at Olympic level.

“Mainstream ideas have shifted over a generation to advice-based, athlete-centred coaching,” said Noguchi, 46, a former swimmer who said he himself was beaten by his coach as a teenager.

“But there are still some coaches who were physically punished in their youth who apparently still believe in the old method. We may have to look at how coaches are educated in sports science universities to prevent a repeat,

 


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Central coach Ndedi teaches worldwide language of soccer : GazPrepSports - High School Sports

Central coach Ndedi teaches worldwide language of soccer : GazPrepSports - High School Sports | Sports Ethics: Cavar, D. | Scoop.it
Adjusting to life in Montana hasn’t always been easy for Didier Ndedi.

How could it be? Ndedi, a native of the west-central African country of Cameroon, has been forced to overcome a language barrier, cultural differences and a distinct climate change since he came to the United States.

But the basics of soccer are the same anywhere in the world. So when Ndedi was hired to become the boys soccer coach at Billings Central, it felt right.

“It’s not easy. Especially in Montana,” said Ndedi, who played professionally in Cameroon and other places in Europe and Southeast Asia. “It’s very cold. Because I’ve been in Germany, I have an idea of cold, but it’s still difficult.

“But, man, we’re human and we have to live in this world. So we have to adjust and make it work.”

Making it work has been Ndedi’s specialty with the Rams this year. The first-year coach has guided Central to a 12-1-0 record and a spot in the Class A state semifinals, where it will host Stevensville Saturday at Wendy’s Field on the campus of Rocky Mountain College.

Not knowing what to expect early on, the Rams thoroughly responded to Ndedi’s coaching style, which stresses a sound technical game and all-around teamwork.

“The kids are amazing,” Ndedi said, a deep accent rolling off his tongue. “They listen a lot. And the most I’m happy about is that they’re very, very respectful. They’re very, very careful about what they’re saying and very respectful of each other. They never complain in the game.

“They just want to have fun, that’s what I did understand with them.”

Read more: http://billingsgazette.com/sports/high-school/soccer/central-coach-ndedi-teaches-worldwide-language-of-soccer/article_7c076619-0e0c-5514-8fc1-4946a61b4ea7.html#ixzz29rArsuDJ


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Arkady Kostochka's comment, August 11, 12:17 PM
This course looks at how OODA loops can be applied to soccer. OODA loops is a decision/action model widely used in the military and by police and first responders. It is ideally suited for the complex, adversarial nature of soccer. Applying these basic ideas is the start of getting, and staying, ahead of your opponent. https://coursmos.com/course/ooda-loops-in-soccer?utm_source=seedcnv&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=sd&utm_content=17
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Soccer Isn't for Girly-Girls? How Parents Pick the Sports Their Daughters Play

Soccer Isn't for Girly-Girls? How Parents Pick the Sports Their Daughters Play | Sports Ethics: Cavar, D. | Scoop.it

Should a girl do soccer, dance, or chess? It depends on what kind of a woman her mom and dad want her to become. (Soccer Isn't for Girly-Girls?


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