Sports Ethics
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Scooped by Justin J Higginbotham
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Philosophy & Ethics Part 1 - Lecture By Professor Dr. Werner Krieglstein (College of DuPage)

Professor Dr. Werner Krieglstein (College of DuPage) giving a lecture for his class Ethics 1110. This is Part 1 of 2. Part 2 can be found at: http://www.yout...
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Scooped by Justin J Higginbotham
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Ethics Conference To Focus On Sports Management - SpaceCoastDaily.com

Ethics Conference To Focus On Sports Management - SpaceCoastDaily.com | Sports Ethics | Scoop.it
SpaceCoastDaily.com Ethics Conference To Focus On Sports Management SpaceCoastDaily.com BREVARD COUNTY, FLORIDA – Ethical and leadership challenges in sports medicine and women's professional sports, and a panel discussion featuring community...
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Rescooped by Justin J Higginbotham from Team Sports Travel Management in New Jersey
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Sports travel services for professional teams, associations & supporters

Sports travel services for professional teams, associations & supporters | Sports Ethics | Scoop.it
TMG Sport offers professional sports travel management services for sports clubs, associations and their supporters.

Via Travel 15
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Rescooped by Justin J Higginbotham from Coaching & Neuroscience
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Co-operative Behaviour: Neuroscience Insights

Co-operative Behaviour:  Neuroscience Insights | Sports Ethics | Scoop.it
Co-operation is essential for the functioning of human societies — and several current public policy initiatives, including health and lifestyle and environmental campaigns, depend upon it. Many attempts to persuade people to co-operate and collaborate, however, fail — or succeed for only a limited time. Understanding the neural mechanisms for co-operation can help in developing more effective ways of promoting collective behaviour and in designing policies to achieve societal aims.

Via Kasia Hein-Peters
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David Hain's curator insight, May 6, 2014 3:46 AM

More insights from neuroscience about how to collaborate effectively.

John Thurlbeck, FCMI FRSA's curator insight, May 7, 2014 3:05 AM

As a developing leader this is the way forward! Effective collaboration makes for great successes and mutuality is a wonderful principle to anchor your leadership behaviour upon! Thanks to David Hain for the great link!

Ruth Obadia's curator insight, May 11, 2014 2:12 AM
Co-operation with others can be inherently satisfying — and that it’s not contingent on the prospect of material reward. (A 2004 experiment, for example, found increased activity in the reward system of the brain for mutual co-operation decisions, even when controlling for the amount of money earned by the decision itself.)Playing games with another human being is more satisfying (rewarding) than playing with a computer partner.The learning of co-operative behaviour is partly dependent on reciprocation — we tend to co-operate, over the longer term, with those who behave well towards us.Co-operation can be motivated by the anticipation of guilt — activity in regions of the brain associated with ‘negative affective states’ increases when people match the expectations of other players.The ability to understand the mental states of others, traditionally referred to as ‘theory of mind’, plays an important part in co-operation.Co-operation is context-specific, depending partly on prior knowledge of others and their trustworthiness.