Sport & Recreation Facility Management
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Times Union Center earns more money, draws more fans, with fewer shows - The Business Review (Albany) (blog)

Times Union Center earns more money, draws more fans, with fewer shows - The Business Review (Albany) (blog) | Sport & Recreation Facility Management | Scoop.it
Times Union Center earns more money, draws more fans, with fewer shows The Business Review (Albany) (blog) The county pays SMG, a private management company headquartered near Philadelphia, to operate the venue (among SMG's other sites is the...

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MEDICAL SPORTS INJURIES IN THE YOUTH ATHLETE: EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

MEDICAL SPORTS INJURIES IN THE YOUTH ATHLETE: EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT | Sport & Recreation Facility Management | Scoop.it

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kevin johnson's curator insight, August 23, 2015 3:51 AM

The number of US emergency department visits for 14 to 19 year olds due to concussions has tripled from 1997 to 2007... between 30 and 58 percent were sports related, (Merkel, D., Molony, J.T., 2012).  "Sports and injuries are inseparable, every athletics program needs a solid medical emergency protocol".

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Lawsuit Shows Why College Recreation Centers Need Risk Management Plan

Lawsuit Shows Why College Recreation Centers Need Risk Management Plan | Sport & Recreation Facility Management | Scoop.it

All sports facility managements nees a Risk Management Plan.

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Damien's curator insight, March 22, 2014 6:58 PM

When we think of creating a sports facility and being either a manager or owner we have to remember it can also be a dangerous place. Meaning incidents happen and lawsuits get filed, so as an owner or manager we have to always remember to have insurance as well as proper risk management plans to protect against t lawsuits and avoid incidents.

Jack Botham's curator insight, August 27, 2015 10:04 AM

This article demonstrates the importance of having a risk management plan in place. Constant audits and inspections are mandatory to avoid serious injury or a potential fatality. It is important for builders to perform inspections not only keep people safe, but also to maintain their own legal obligations. Building inspections further ensure that structures and equipment on site, such as scaffolds, are in good working order to prevent a court case similar to the one in this article. A case like this could result in a builder being forced out of business due to financial penalty. A fatality on a site could result in the builder being sent to prison due to legislation breach.

bryant tucker's curator insight, July 23, 5:33 PM

This article in my opinion picks up on the facts of why not just recreation centers should have a risk management plan, but it coincides with any type of facility that will keep from having lawsuits or any issues.

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More ESPN Reporters Have Undisclosed Endorsement Deals

More ESPN Reporters Have Undisclosed Endorsement Deals | Sport & Recreation Facility Management | Scoop.it
The New York Times reported that three ESPN personalities have endorsement contracts with Nike -- endorsement contracts that ESPN didn't even know about. Perhaps needless to add, ESPN viewers were also kept in the dark about these contracts.

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Sports Facilities Management

The Sports Facilities Management Program is designed to prepare you to move into workplace positions and upgrade proficiency of individuals who are currently employed in sport facility management positions.

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Tony McBride's curator insight, June 25, 2015 1:18 PM

Nice short and to the point video about the Sports facilities Management field.Two thumbs up!

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Quote of the Day: Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel on the Wrigley Field ... - NBCSports.com

Quote of the Day: Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel on the Wrigley Field ... - NBCSports.com | Sport & Recreation Facility Management | Scoop.it
NBCSports.com
Quote of the Day: Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel on the Wrigley Field ...
NBCSports.com
Then they asked if they could have $100 million in taxpayer subsidies, and I said, 'No.' Then, they asked about $55 million in ...
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Emergency Response Plans for Colleges and Universities | Sport Risk Management - McGregor and Associates

Emergency Response Plans for Colleges and Universities | Sport Risk Management - McGregor and Associates | Sport & Recreation Facility Management | Scoop.it

"The question is what emergencies should a Campus Recreation program prepare for, and how should they prepare."


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Sports Risk Management

Sports Risk Management | Sport & Recreation Facility Management | Scoop.it
Sportscounsel eliminates the red cards in sporting careers by looking at how the business of sport affects sporting achievement.

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Buyer Beware: Food At Arena Concessions

Food safety experts discuss the challenges and dangers of the preparation, storage, and handling of food at sports arena concession stands.

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Should Sports Teams Receive Tax Breaks?

Should Sports Teams Receive Tax Breaks? | Sport & Recreation Facility Management | Scoop.it
Here are some of the costs, pros and cons of sports teams receiving tax breaks. 

 

In a very general sense, the question of tax breaks for sports teams falls under the category of whether or not subsidies are desirable. From an economic perspective on subsidies, some could say that almost all of them create suboptimal outcomes. This is because under normal market conditions market forces move automatically towards allocative efficiency. Subsidies distort the ability of markets to correctly allocate resources because they provide an incentive to continue the subsidized behavior, even when it is not profitable or productive to do so.

 

Why Subsidies Are Useful
The counterargument is that subsidies are useful for this very reason. They allow government to shape economic outcomes toward desired policy objectives. For example, the money used to fund alternative energy sources. So although the subsidy is creating a less than optimal use of resources, people believe that is balanced by the development of technology that might not have otherwise been built until much later, if at all. Another reason people champion subsidies is to protect jobs or create growth. However, the job market is subject to the same economic forces as any other. By creating subsidies in unproductive industries people remain in jobs that are also unproductive; this makes society worse off. In the case of sports teams, the most commonly cited reason for subsidies is that it creates jobs and improves revenues. Yet there have been studies that conclude that this is not always the case.

 

Not All Need Tax Breaks
Most sports teams are actually quite profitable and do not actually require tax breaks to remain competitive. Examples of the types of subsidies sports teams regularly enjoy include: tax-deductible ticket sales (including on luxury suites), reduction of taxes on revenue via direct tax credits and sweet-heart deals on new facilities. What this means is that corporations, and even individuals, can deduct a portion of what they spend on tickets in a similar manner as donating to a charity. In the case of new stadiums, the burden of building and operating arenas gets pushed onto the taxpayer while owners reap the related revenues. Unfortunately, due to the secretive nature of professional teams, most financial information is inaccessible thus preventing the public from accurately gauging the level of financial support these franchises receive.

 

However, let us be fair and consider the case where sports teams are legitimately struggling and only government aid can keep them afloat. This hearkens back to the beginning of this piece and the discussion on whether or not it is believed that subsidies are useful. Insofar as civic pride is concerned, maybe it is considered appropriate to prop up a flailing team. People have an emotional connection to their sports teams. They buy tickets to games, purchase merchandise and follow every story about their chosen champions. Despite this, only a very small portion of the population (20%) thinks that tax breaks for sports teams is good policy.

 

The intuition for this is that if a sports team is failing it is because it is poorly run and is spending itself into a hole, or the fans do not support it with enough revenue to continue. Either way, this is not an enterprise that should be having public money thrown at it. Perhaps the largest segment of government support goes toward the construction of stadiums. Fancy new stadiums attract fans and sports teams alike.

 

Cities often will use the promise of a new stadium to entice teams to relocate. Is this a good investment on behalf of the public? Almost all economists and independent development specialists conclude that the rate of return on these projects is less than what could be had on alternative projects, with some sports contracts failing significantly. Further, those cities that invested heavily in sports stadiums have experienced, on average, slower income growth compared to their peers who chose otherwise.

 

The Bottom Line
There is no silver lining. The public does not support deluxe treatments for sports teams in the form of tax breaks, the data does not support tax breaks for sports teams and commonly accepted economic theory does not support tax breaks for sports teams either. This leaves fans and citizens paying double as both their taxes and discretionary income go towards profitable franchises instead of schools and roads. The only people who benefit from such activity are those who own, operate and work for sports franchises. As Norman Braman, former owner of the NFL's Philadelphia Eagles, put it: "the taxpayers are a bunch of suckers."


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Vinnie's curator insight, February 17, 2015 9:08 PM

Basic breakdown of public subsidy benefits for sports teams.

Bryant Tucker's curator insight, July 24, 6:10 PM
This is a great article that gives an understanding of both the good and bad of the tax breaks, as well as the notion that some teams are very profitable and could afford their own building efforts.
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Questions & Answers about Diabetes in the Workplace  and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

Questions & Answers about Diabetes in the Workplace  and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) | Sport & Recreation Facility Management | Scoop.it
Questions & Answers about Diabetes in the Workplace  and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

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World’s most beautiful eco-friendly sports stadiums

World’s most beautiful eco-friendly sports stadiums | Sport & Recreation Facility Management | Scoop.it
Sustainability is one of the top priorities these days in the field of architecture.

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