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Volvo negotiating China endorsement deal with NBA star Jeremy Lin, sources say

Volvo negotiating China endorsement deal with NBA star Jeremy Lin, sources say | Sport Management: Papania, T | Scoop.it
Jeremy Lin, the New York Knicks basketball player who surged in popularity this year, is in talks on an endorsement deal with Zhejiang Geely Holding Group Co.'s Volvo Cars, three people familiar with the matter said.

Via Jon Samuelson
Tyler Papania's insight:

This article shows a perfect example of how a company can capitalize on an athlete being from a foreign country or having roots there. With Jeremy Lin having Chinese origins, Volvo figures that they can grab a big piece of the automobile market in China by advertising Lin in association with their vehicles. With this deal, Volvo hopes to eventually open two car building factories and an engine plant somewhere in China. 

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Sports marketing and technology with the New England Patriots | ZDNet

Sports marketing and technology with the New England Patriots  | ZDNet | Sport Management: Papania, T | Scoop.it
Savvy fans have pushed professional sports to provide mobility, content, data, and analytics in an ongoing quest to engage more completely with the audience.
Tyler Papania's insight:

From a business standpoint, becoming and staying a successful sports arganization depends heavily on the commitment of your fans. Without revenue from fans, how can a team hope to continually grow and become more successful? Teams like the Patriots realize this and have recently come up with ways to get more fans in stadium seats to push ticket sales as well as hoping that they buy concessions and merchandise while there. 

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Jacob Simons's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:25 PM

This article discusses how network infrastructure, data, ands mobility are all becoming more and more prevalent in sports nowadays. As the article stated, teams are now “using technology to deepen relationships with fans”. The stadiums, arenas, etc. are now ideal wireless zones where people will always have service to do what they please. Enabling fans to connect easily to wireless on their mobile devices creates the quality of life in the stadium to be improved. I found this article to be interesting because it is very hard to imagine attending a sporting event and not being able to get service while in the facility. Also, it is interesting because this article really describes how much people actually rely on technology even when they are actually present at the sporting event. This is educational because it is something this simple that can go unrecognized and seen as a factor for fan attendance. It is important to know what the consumer, or the fan in this case wants and how they want their experience to be in order to fulfill their needs and wants. This can make me better in the sports management industry because I want to get into sports marketing. With that being said, it is important to know what is being marketed recently and stay relevant with what is currently happening. Again, this article’s importance goes along with knowing what is currently happening in the sports marketing industry and what is being provided to the consumers because of their wants and needs. This is also important because it allows the marketing of phone companies to expand their advertising even in stadiums, arenas, etc. because they know that people attending the sporting events would be interested.   

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Roger Goodell says NFL wants teams in both Los Angeles and London

Roger Goodell says NFL wants teams in both Los Angeles and London | Sport Management: Papania, T | Scoop.it
The NFL has flirted with the idea of placing a team in either Los Angeles, and more recently London, for years now. Commissioner Roger Goodell just cranked up the flirtation into an informal courting.
Tyler Papania's insight:

Roger Doodell has repeatedly stated that he wants to have the NFL be relevant in both Los Angeles and London. This relates to us talking in class about expanding your market and attracting new fans. With there already being fan interest in LA and London, putting a team in one or both of those cities could increase revenue for the league. 

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Volvo negotiating China endorsement deal with NBA star Jeremy Lin, sources say

Volvo negotiating China endorsement deal with NBA star Jeremy Lin, sources say | Sport Management: Papania, T | Scoop.it
Jeremy Lin, the New York Knicks basketball player who surged in popularity this year, is in talks on an endorsement deal with Zhejiang Geely Holding Group Co.'s Volvo Cars, three people familiar with the matter said.

Via Jon Samuelson
Tyler Papania's insight:

This article shows a perfect example of how a company can capitalize on an athlete being from a foreign country or having roots there. With Jeremy Lin having Chinese origins, Volvo figures that they can grab a big piece of the automobile market in China by advertising Lin in association with their vehicles. With this deal, Volvo hopes to eventually open two car building factories and an engine plant somewhere in China. 

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LeBron James' Strive For Greatness Campaign Expands Beyond Work On The ... - Forbes

LeBron James' Strive For Greatness Campaign Expands Beyond Work On The ... - Forbes | Sport Management: Papania, T | Scoop.it
LeBron James' Strive For Greatness Campaign Expands Beyond Work On The ...
Forbes
Darren Heitner is a Partner at Wolfe Law Miami, P.A.
Tyler Papania's insight:

I think that this article depicts the perfect image of what companies shoot for when they decide to sponsor and market an athlete. Nike uses the slogan "Strive for Greatness" to describe what LeBron is doing through his career. One can also use that slogan to describe Nike's mission. They have signed an athlete who sets a great example for youth and others as they "Strive for Greatness."

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Getting in on the Gay: Sports Marketing to LGBTs

Getting in on the Gay: Sports Marketing to LGBTs | Sport Management: Papania, T | Scoop.it

Two of the biggest media sensations on the sports circuit right now, 22 year-old Brittney Griner and 34 year-old Jason Collins, have become household names and LGBT heroes. Their popularity has extended beyond the court and both are looking at the sweet benefits of being marketable.


Via Matt Skallerud
Tyler Papania's insight:

This article focuses a lot on how two gay athletes have become very marketable because of their connections with sport. It speaks about the positives of marketing athletes in order to drive sales. It also shows that it pays to take advantage of a situation like that of Bittney Griner and Jason Collins to reach another market that might not have before been interested. 

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Stephen Basden's comment, September 17, 2013 10:17 PM
I learned a lot about how Griner charisma and confidence made it easy for Nike to make such a bold decision.
What I found particularly interesting about this article is the fact that Brittney Griner became the first openly gay athlete to be endorsed by Nike. I think this is a power move for the company in many ways, but what else would we expect from a dominant company like Nike.
I selected this article because I was very interested in the title alone. With more and more athletes coming out as homosexual, sports are now a safe place for the LGBT community. With that being said, it's time to sell to them, and this is how.
This just furthers my knowledge of marketing. Who to market to and how.
Joe Mechenbier's curator insight, October 29, 2013 5:34 PM

Brittany Griner and Nike have an endorsement deal, but Griner will be modeling clothes for men, not women. This is huge for sport marketing because the LGBT demographic is largely unclaimed and Nike is annoucing thier support for the LGBT community.

Chris Melendey's curator insight, October 14, 2014 10:11 PM

This article talks about Brittney Griner and how nike is using her to market different kinds of products. Griner is the first openly gay woman that nike has sponsored. Girly clothes really wasn't her style so Nike is sponsoring her with mens clothes and Nike SB. This approach will broaden Nike mens products to women. I found this entire article interesting and this opens a different way of marketing for me. 

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Bears Were Also Dominant As A Sports-marketing Force

Bears Were Also Dominant As A Sports-marketing Force | Sport Management: Papania, T | Scoop.it
The 1985 Bears sold a lot more than football tickets.They sold everything from credit cards to fried chicken, automobiles to sunglasses. They sold foot powder and junk bonds, cereal and paper...
Tyler Papania's insight:

This aticle details another example of how a sport organization can take advantage of the star power that it has. With four star players, the 1985 Chicago bears were able to grab endorsement deals with national as well as local companies. Having these star players as well as a championship winning team allowed the Bears to completely overtake every other team in the league in merchandise sales. 

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China Bans LeBron James Nike Ad (washingtonpost.com)

China Bans LeBron James Nike Ad (washingtonpost.com) | Sport Management: Papania, T | Scoop.it

“Fear Room” banned commercial~

Ethics & Social responsibility-

 

Cultural sensitivity when it comes to marketing in other countries is very important.  Ethics is defined as the moral principles or values that generally govern the conduct of an individual or a group. Since sensitivity and etiquette can improve cross-cultural communication it’s important that when marketing it’s better to be well prepared of the do’s and don’t in a different culture.  China’s most popular sports league is the NBA, and actually is also the largest market outside of the USA, of course, for the NBA.  There’s even a Lebron James museum in Shanghai sponsored by Nike. Efforts to promote basketball in China were hindered when the Miami Heat player, Lebron James’ Nike TV Commercial was banned from the country.  The market audience was directed towards children in China, but what the producers for the commercial failed to do was research what could not be added in the clip.  The best way to not step on anyone toes is by altering the marketing mix.  The commercial was said to be blasphemous for violating China’s regulations to upholding the countries dignity and culture. 

 

The way this ad plays in to the social responsibility is that marketers had ethical responsibilities to do what’s right, and that was to do research. In addition to that, Nike ad makers had legal responsibilities to abide by.  James defeating a kung fu master did not uphold China’s mandate to maintain the interest and national culture in ad making.  Communist officials weren’t keen on the misuse of Chinese symbols especially showing a foreigner defeating them.  It would have seemed that the culture could be beat.  Lebron is videoed defeating dragons, which in the traditional culture are sacred symbols.  The NBA player obviously did not know better, he was just doing his job, but he was still sorry for the offensive ad.  In the end, Nike respected the government’s decision to ban the ad. 

 

This article is relevant to an early class discussion we had back in chapter three.  When choosing a target market, culture needs high consideration.  For example, professor Baruca once mentioned Asia to the class.  Then he asked during his series of questions if anyone had considered India; only one student did. Most forget how large Asia actually is, not everyone is yellow. 

 

Other students should read the article and watch the commercial because it’s a good reminder of how easily anyone can be so culturally ignorant; that’s never good for marketing.  My opinion of this story is that this was a perfect example of how a popular brand can suffer the consequences from such a simple mistake.

 

 

 

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A41825-2004Dec6.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ROy-mneX3do


Via Arne
Tyler Papania's insight:

Although this ad is 9 years old at this point, it still holds some relevance today. It talks about how Nike was unable to market LeBron's "Air Zoom LeBron 2" shoes in china because the advertisement they made was considered offensive in that country. China stated that the ad violated their regulations on national dignity. This shows that people in sport marketing and marketing in general should always be aware of the sensitivity of others to the content they are releasing. 

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Dominic Formato's curator insight, December 15, 2013 7:30 PM

Ethics is defined as the moral principles or values that generally govern the conduct of an individual or a group. Since sensitivity and etiquette can improve cross-cultural communication it’s important that when marketing it’s better to be well prepared of the do’s and don’t in a different culture. It is very clear that in this case the producer of the commercial didnt take into account of the do's and do not's especially in a commercial thats topic is the biggest sport that has a tremendous amount of marketing as well as the sports most famous figure in it. There are probably reasons why that the commercial was aired the way it was but the actions were inexcusible. The viewers of the commercial not only are going to be offended but also have their mindsets changed on the NBA and Lebron James when they didnt even have anything to do with the situation. According to this article there is a Lebron James hall of fame in Shanghai China. There is now a good chance that the people were offended will visit the hall of fame and not consume the nike or lebron products because of some carelessness. This was clearly a mistake and there were apologies that were exchanged but that might not be good enough.

 

This article has to do with target market, you need to consider all of your options and hope that all research has been done and that the marketing target is convinced. An example is that in today it is no longer appropiate to say oriental anymore it is appropiate to just say asian and because some people do still use the term oriental it leads racism and which is why world peace is such a struggle.

 

I think that people should read this article because they need to understand how about doing things and that even professionals of all kinds make mistakes but those mistakes can make or break someones career Tiger Woods is also a good example. It just goes to show you how important it is to be prepared in life.

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Sport and the mobile marketing revolution - Mobile Commerce Daily - Columns

Sport and the mobile marketing revolution - Mobile Commerce Daily - Columns | Sport Management: Papania, T | Scoop.it
mobile has yet to tap the true potential of sporting events. eager fans are ready to engage on their second screens http://t.co/B2E315rfJo
Tyler Papania's insight:

This is another article that talks about how much technology is helping sport become so much more marketable. It talks about how easy it is for specific teams and organizations to reach their fans using mobile devices. With the use of location services on smart phones and tablets, organizations can advertise to people through apps based specifically on where they are located. 

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What Brand Marketers Can Learn from Lance Armstrong

What Brand Marketers Can Learn from Lance Armstrong | Sport Management: Papania, T | Scoop.it

Apparently, in some cases, even if you can conquer cancer and raise half a billion dollars for cancer research, never go up against the Goliath of corporate marketing.

 

The tragic fall of cyclist Lance Armstrong will serve as fodder for business and marketing case studies for years to come. How can a cancer-surviving, elite athlete who won what some consider the toughest athletic event on earth be so unceremoniously dumped into brand marketing's trash heap? How can sponsors like Nike and Anheuser-Busch seemingly throw millions of dollars at Lance and just as quickly turn a cold shoulder to him? What were brand marketers missing?

 

Reams of evidence are showing Lance to be a cheat. And it's clear that cheating at what brought you your fame and fortune in unacceptable to sponsors. That's why Tiger Woods, who faced a myriad of personal issues in a very public divorce, is still sponsored by Nike. Tiger didn't cheat at golf. Further, Tiger also apologized, and he did so quickly. Lance Armstrong hasn't and may never apologize.

 

Is Corporate Marketing At Fault?

How much actual vetting and research did Nike do before signing Lance Armstrong? How thoroughly did they look at Lance and the sport of cycling? Cycling for years has been viewed as a corrupt sport full of back room deals and finger pointing that was long overdue for an overhaul in governance. Should Nike have taken a deep dive into the cycling system to see how it really worked? Perhaps they would have nixed all cycling sponsorships if they had. It seems that some intense vetting would have shown alarming patterns of cheating and doping permeating the entire cycling system. So, did Lance Armstrong singlehandedly bring down cycling or was he simply trying to outwit an already corrupt and flawed system.

 

As brand marketers, we owe it to ourselves and to our clients to truly vet potential sponsorships. My sense is that a few weeks being embedded within the cycling community, even in the late 1990s, would have exposed some very unappealing truths that should have raised a red flag even for the most eager of sponsors. We need to be overly cognizant of the systems and the processes of the industries we look to for sponsorship. Just because a gangster is likeable and handsome and has a personal story that resonates across demographics - he's still part of the mafia.

 

Is Lance Armstrong at fault? Yes. Is the sport of cycling at fault? Most definitely. Is Nike Corporate Marketing to blame? Yes. Did they look past the seedy side of cycling to the potential revenue uptick that Lance could bring them? Most likely.

 

As marketers we need to vet not only the product, service, or person - we also need to consider the systems and processes that produce the product or service or person - if the systems are corrupt and flawed - their outcomes will likely be corrupt and flawed as well.

Tyler Papania's insight:

This article brings up a very good argument when it somes to signing athletes to sponsorship deals. Companies market these athletes that they sign in order to sell more merchandise. If these companies want to avoid wasting their money or creating bad PR for themselves, they need to take a more personal look at the athlete and their sport rather than just signing a big name because of their name.

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How The Sports Industry Is Setting The Trend In Social

How The Sports Industry Is Setting The Trend In Social | Sport Management: Papania, T | Scoop.it
The world of sports is quickly become 'social first,' and is setting the benchmark for all industries to follow.

Via Marcos Castro, Kirk Helferich, brittney wells
Tyler Papania's insight:

This article brings up one of the most relevant topics in sport marketing today. That is the use of Social Media by sport organizations. It seems like almost everyone with a Twitter account follows their favorite sports team. Because of this, teams are able to tweet to thousands about giveaways and deals that they hope will drive sales. 

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