Sport Management: Flanagan, A.
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BYU Cross-Country Runner Banned From Competition by NCAA — the Reason May Perplex You | TheBlaze.com

BYU Cross-Country Runner Banned From Competition by NCAA — the Reason May Perplex You | TheBlaze.com | Sport Management: Flanagan, A. | Scoop.it
Yet another collegiate athlete has been banned from competition by the NCAA for what might seem like an innocuous reason.
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Compulsory brain scans and genetic tests for boxers—or should boxing be banned? -- Spriggs 30 (5): 515 -- Journal of Medical Ethics

Andrew Flanagan's insight:

The article was written back in 2003 which is a little dated but still interesting. Compulsory brain scans can show signs of damage before the actual damage has occured compared to cat scans. Boxing is a very dangerous sport and some people called for the elimination of it. From 1974-2003 three boxers have died from hits taken in the ring. The article shows efforts of ways to improve on boxing but the australian medical association is still calling for its elimination. Flash forward to the year 2013 and we are seeing similar things to the NFL and the drop in youth football because of the dangers of hits taken to the head associated with the game. Social responsibility and globalization both play a role in this article. Every measure possible should be taken whether determining a sport is dangerous. 

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Lance Armstrong dismissed as 'delusional' by Betsy Andreu - The Guardian

Lance Armstrong dismissed as 'delusional' by Betsy Andreu - The Guardian | Sport Management: Flanagan, A. | Scoop.it
The Guardian
Lance Armstrong dismissed as 'delusional' by Betsy Andreu
The Guardian
Michele Verroken, the former director of ethics at UK Sport, told BBC Breakfast she believes a life ban is an "absolutely appropriate" punishment for Armstrong.

Via Keith Lyons
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Why we should allow performance enhancing drugs in sport -- Savulescu et al. 38 (6): 666 -- British Journal of Sports Medicine

Why we should allow performance enhancing drugs in sport -- Savulescu et al. 38 (6): 666 -- British Journal of Sports Medicine | Sport Management: Flanagan, A. | Scoop.it
Andrew Flanagan's insight:

The basic argument to this article is that if we allow performance enhancing drugs in sport then it could be regulated and also safer. The awards of cheating (winning, money, fame) outweigh the cost which would be getting caught. However, the "spirit of the sport" (ethics, morals, fun) would be lost. The problem is what about the athletes who don't want to dope? They most likely wouldn't stand a chance and people would be at high crossroads on what to actually do. Social responsibilty is a huge part of this article. There are many concerns regarding performance enhancing drugs and it does question the ethics of some physicians/doctors and personnel associated with sport management. 

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Is science killing sport? Gene therapy and its possible abuse in doping

Andrew Flanagan's insight:

The article talks about how banned substances (which were made to treat human disease) are now being taken by athletes to get bigger, faster, and stronger. If gene therapy can be used for medical purposes then the article states it will be used for enhancement purposes as well. It goes back to the question of what actually is "doping" and how will this affect sport. Social responsibility, fairness, and globalization are all present in the article. It's not fair to create some rules that others may not want to partake in. Also if this does happen it needs to be on a global level and not just a national level otherwise countries would have an advantage over another country. 

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The NFL is Running a Billion-Dollar Con - Pulling No Punches - October 2013 - Pittsburgh, PA

The NFL is Running a Billion-Dollar Con - Pulling No Punches - October 2013 - Pittsburgh, PA | Sport Management: Flanagan, A. | Scoop.it
The welfare kings of the NFL are laughing all the way to the bank, and you’re not in on the joke.

Via Ramy Jabbar رامي
Andrew Flanagan's insight:

This article has many ethical dilemmas written all over it. NFL receives 68% of it’s funding for stadiums by taxpayers. Yet owner of the Minnesota Vikings Zygi Wilf is facing a lawsuit defrauding people millions of dollars. He threatened to relocate the team during a time when the city of Minneapolis public schools are facing budget cuts. This has to do with Social responsibility as an owner many fans have trust in you to do the right thing. This could also be organizational culture as threatening to relocate a team could have a negative impact for current fans. 

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Shutdown may force Marine Corps to cancel DC marathon - Military Times

Politico
Shutdown may force Marine Corps to cancel DC marathon
Military Times
“Without a resolution to the government shutdown this week, the MCM as planned is in jeopardy of being canceled,” race director Rick Nealis wrote in the release.
Andrew Flanagan's insight:

The future of the Marine Corps Marathon was threatened by the government shutdown. Thankfully matters were covered but it was unclear if runners would be reimbursed or let into another race. There were many ethical decisions to be made. Especially since all the military academies were able to play there football games considering they were also on federal grounds. I think this has to do with ethics within an organization because you have to look at what is the right thing and if the race could actually still go on without actually harming anything. 

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AAOS: Balancing Medical Ethics With Sports Medicine for High-Level Athletes

AAOS: Balancing Medical Ethics With Sports Medicine for High-Level Athletes | Sport Management: Flanagan, A. | Scoop.it
Latest news and guidance on sports medicine.
Andrew Flanagan's insight:

The article talks about how doctors have trouble treating and diagnosing "high-level" athletes who may be trying to be rushed back onto the field and how there are many external factors that play a role in giving someone a diagnosis. To me its important to put the well-being of the athlete first. Its better to miss only a few weeks than miss an entire year or even worse. There are many ethical guidelines doctors have to follow and sometimes doctors/physicians have the toughest job. They can be easily persuaded with huge benefits but also diasterous consequences. Social responsibility, and distributive play a role in this article. 

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Cycling Is Cleaner Sport, Not a Safer One - ETHICS IN SPORT

Cycling Is Cleaner Sport, Not a Safer One - ETHICS IN SPORT | Sport Management: Flanagan, A. | Scoop.it

Where to now for Cycling?? Should there be a paradigm shift?

 

While more cycling teams are committed to racing clean, more needs to be done, a cyclist says (Michael Barry), if the sport is to shake its past.

 

YEAR 11 & 12 HPE - ETHICS IN SPORT / GENERAL INTEREST


Via Craig Crossley
Andrew Flanagan's insight:

Cycling will always be reffered to as one of the dirtiest sports there is. Michael Barry wrote a very interesting article how he made many unethical decisions in his past not only doping but also riding with broken bones but they way things were 10 years ago you had too. He talks about how the sport is becoming cleaner but how health is still not a large priority. Ethics, fairness, and organizational culture all play a role in this article. Riders from many different teams are coming out and saying how dangerous and corrupt the sport has been and it would take a governing body to fix it. 

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Anthony J. Cameron's curator insight, September 12, 2014 2:06 PM

There are so many athletes that have won on the grandstand without the use of performance enhancing drugs. Cycling has tried to clean up their image since the Lance Armstrong's case. His case tainted that sport and questions other cyclists that compete at the Tour de France.

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Summary and agreement statement of the 2nd International Conference on Concussion in Sport, Prague 2004 -- McCrory et al. 39 (4): 196 -- British Journal of Sports Medicine

Summary and agreement statement of the 2nd International Conference on Concussion in Sport, Prague 2004 -- McCrory et al. 39 (4): 196 -- British Journal of Sports Medicine | Sport Management: Flanagan, A. | Scoop.it
Andrew Flanagan's insight:

This was an interesting article to look at considering it was back in 2004. It's crazy that concussions were a problem almost a decade ago yet we still have them today and in some cases seeing them more often. The areas in the article that I thought were important was the authors definition of a concussion, subtypes of a concussion, classification of a concussion, prevention and the future. Training parents, coaches, and especially athletes of signs and symptoms are things they were working on back then and what we are still doing today. Distributive justice was pretty important in this article. Player safety needs to be a top priority in sport and unfortunately the NFL tried to hide it for as long as they could. 

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Effect of exercise-induced muscle damage on endurance running performance in humans - Marcora - 2007 - Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports - Wiley Online Library

Effect of exercise-induced muscle damage on endurance running performance in humans - Marcora - 2007 - Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports - Wiley Online Library | Sport Management: Flanagan, A. | Scoop.it
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Hypoxic air machines: performance enhancement through effective training—or cheating? -- Spriggs 31 (2): 112 -- Journal of Medical Ethics

Andrew Flanagan's insight:

Hypoxic air machines are used in many endurance sports but the Australian Football League is now investigating there use. One official says it hurts the image of the game however, they don't violate any antidoping rules. The argument is that the air machine is thought to increase the amount of red blood cells similar to EPO which is a highly banned substance in all sports. This article raises questions on what should be banned in sport. Distributive justice plays a role in the fact that these air machines are already legal but can't be determined if they are performance enhancing as well as functional conflict. 

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Mo Farah joins Wilshere's 'English' debate by stressing patriotic pride

Mo Farah joins Wilshere's 'English' debate by stressing patriotic pride | Sport Management: Flanagan, A. | Scoop.it
Mo Farah has said 'making your country proud is what matters' in reply to Jack Wilshere's comment that only English players should play football for England
Andrew Flanagan's insight:

This article was about England Olympian Mo Farrah responding to Jack Wilshere and his comment how people born in England should be the only ones who play for England. This crosses ethical boundaries because Mo Farrah earned his citizenship and like many other athletes who represent countries and are proud to do so. this article deals with Human Rights and Social Responsibility. As an athlete anything you say will be used all over social media and can be taken out of context. It's the athletes responsibility to keep those types of opinions to themselves. 

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