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USAF Explores Turning Eastern Range into Commercial Spaceport Operation | Parabolic Arc

USAF Explores Turning Eastern Range into Commercial Spaceport Operation | Parabolic Arc | Spectrum | Scoop.it
Range CBA Commercial Engagement Agency: Department of the Air Force Office: Air Force Space Command Headquarters Air Force Space Command, Launch and Range
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Canada: Spectrum transfer framework: looks good for Verizon, bad for Rogers | TeleGeography

Christian Paradis, Canada’s Minister of Industry, on Friday announced the release of the wireless spectrum licence transfer framework, aimed at improving competition by promoting at least four mobile network operators in every region of the country.

 

As previously announced by Mr Paradis on 4 June, all spectrum transfer requests will be reviewed, and those that would result in ‘undue spectrum concentration, and therefore diminish competition’ will not be permitted – the attempt by Telus to acquire Mobilicity has already been blocked by this rule. Decisions on transfer requests will be made on a case-by-case basis and will be issued publicly to increase transparency and clarity.

 

The rules apply to all licence transfers, including prospective transfers that could arise from options and other agreements – this includes the already-agreed option for Rogers to acquire cableco Shaw’s unused mobile frequencies across several regions in 2014, which is pending an application for federal permission (but which Paradis has already stated he does not support), as well as an agreement struck last month between Rogers and Videotron under which Rogers would buy a portion of unused spectrum in the greater Toronto area from Videotron.

 

Under the newly released framework, a licensee will be required to seek a review within 15 days of entering into any agreement that could lead to a prospective transfer. Industry Canada will review a prospective transfer as though the future licence transfer that could arise from the agreement has been made.

 

The new rules state that reviews will normally be completed within twelve weeks from the time of receipt of all required information, although this timeline may vary due to requests for further information, where the applicants require additional time to respond to specific concerns raised, or where the complexity of the issues raised in the course of a review demands a longer period of time in order to consider the effects of the licence transfer (or prospective transfer).

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Mobile phones and actual changes in the global South

Mobile phones and actual changes in the global South | Spectrum | Scoop.it
Presentation notes from Postill, J. 2013. Mobile phones and actual changes (big and small) in the global South: a preliminary exploration. Keynote address to the Mobile Telephony in the Developing ...

 

Abstract

The study of mobile phones has boomed over the past ten years. Today it is doubtless one of the more vibrant research areas across the whole of media and communication studies. But this is also an undertheorised field, as a number of authors have pointed out. In this paper I heed the call for further theoretical work by addressing a blind spot in our field of vision, namely the elusive relationship between mobiles and sociocultural change. I suggest that we think about change not in the present continuous as we usually do (how things are chang-ing at present) but in the recent past, revisiting the empirical examples we have to date on actual changes that have already taken place, and then try and work out what part, if any, mobile phones played in those changes. I explore this approach through examples drawn from three strands of the bourgeoning mobile telephony literature, including some of my own primary research, namely political mobilisation, mobiles and markets, and everyday mobile sociality.

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Future of Wireless: White space provokes heated debate in Cambridge | Mobile Wireless

Future of Wireless: White space provokes heated debate in Cambridge | Mobile Wireless | Spectrum | Scoop.it

The benefits of white space technology fuelled some debate amongst attendees at the Future of Wireless International Conference 2013 on Monday, who gathered to discuss the Internet of Things and Machine-to-Machine technology.

 

Qualcomm caused something of a stir by taking a sceptical view of white space, which shocked many of the attendees, particularly as Cambridge has been the heart of the UK’s white space trial since 2012.

 

“It's not as glorious as originally thought. My bias comes from what I see happening in the US – the US is trying to gather that spectrum back up and sell it to raise money for the government,” said Bill McFarland, Vice President, Technology for Qualcomm.

 

“The result of that is that there may be relatively little spectrum left over for this kind of unlicensed application where a sensor could use it. I think that white spaces probably won't prove to be very good, available mobile spectrum to use, so it's likely that people will have to resort to the other unlicensed bands that are already available such as 900MHz, 2.4 GHz and 5GHz.”

 

McFarland also fears that white space will not gain momentum if it is not “legally available internationally”, once IoT devices come onto the market.

 

“Even if the UK has good availability of white spaces, if it's only a few countries or regions then it may be hard for it to catch on. Since North America is moving away from it and the spectrum was never allocated in China or Asia, you may find it difficult to build momentum behind it,” he added.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Libraries may be hubs for the next round of white space broadband pilots | CivSource

Libraries may be hubs for the next round of white space broadband pilots | CivSource | Spectrum | Scoop.it

We’ve been following the progress of several pilots using TV White Space Broadband (TVWS). Essentially, TVWS is the use of vacant TV channel spectrum to transmit data, thus providing broadband to populations who don’t have access to high speed fiber connectivity.

 

Big players like Google and Microsoft have made big bets on the spectrum with the help up Carlson Wireless which is providing the backhaul technology. In June, we interviewed Carlson Wireless President and CEO Jim Carlson about those efforts.

 

Now, the Gigabit Libraries Network (GLN) has announced an open call for public libraries to join a national Super Wi-Fi pilot, relying on TVWS.

 

TVWS was first called Super Wi-Fi by former Federal Communications Commissioner (FCC) Julius Genachowski. The name isn’t totally accurate, but the concept he was getting at is close. CivSource spoke with Don Means, Gigabit Libraries Network coordinator about how this project might work in practice.

 

GLN is an open collaboration of libraries that work as a distributed testbed for high performance applications and equipment that benefit from big bandwidth. For this pilot, Means envisions that libraries can leverage their local white space channels to create remote high speed access networks.

 

“This has grown out of our existing broadband advocacy work,” Means says. “Roughly 80 million people access the internet at the library over the course of a year, for many of them it is their only means of access.”

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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