Special Topics Educ 5199 G What is Technology doing to Language?
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IS There A "Typical" Tennis Elbow Recovery Time?

Why is it that some Tennis Elbow injuries take mere weeks to heal, while others take months – or even years to fully recover from? Allen Willette, from Tennis Elbow Classroom tackles this challenging question.

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TennisElbowClassroom's curator insight, October 16, 2013 3:19 AM

There's no doubt the recovery time for Tennis Elbow is highly variable - as in "all over the map" - One thing is almost certain though, resting, hoping and waiting is not the path to tendon healing. This article explains why: 

http://tenniselbowclassroom.com/tennis-elbow-treatments/how-long-to-heal-tennis-elbow/

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A Guide to Buying a New Car

Download A Guide to Buying a New Car – Some general information about buying a car. The decision you make on the day you buy a car will have an effect on the money in your pocket long after you drive it home for the first time. When you buy a car, whether new or second­ hand, the ... http://www.carrepman.com/uncategorized-repair-manual/a-guide-to-buying-a-new-car/


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Empowering patients leads to better diabetes care: a collaborative approach...: EBSCOhost

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permalink needs to be added for off site use

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Is language dead or evolving? - The Boston Globe

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This article discusses statistics derived from different journals and from the Pew Internet and American Life Project: http://www.pewinternet.org/ that suggests that although language is changing it is not as detrimental as some might have us believe. It also suggests that educators can counter act any erosion that they are seeing with educating their students on how to write correctly. I am still unclear why many people think that today's generation is incapable of making the distinction between social speech, and academic language and why the education system is either unaware or not capable of teaching student's the proper froms of writing. I think they aren't giving this generation or educators enough credit.

 

This is a quote from the article that I found effective in summing up the evolution of language:

 

"The only language that doesn't change is a dead language." Derek Denis

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Does technology have a negative effect on the way we use language? - Curiosity

Does technology have a negative effect on the way we use language? - Curiosity | Special Topics Educ 5199 G What is Technology doing to Language? | Scoop.it
Does technology have a negative effect on the way we use language? Find out if our expert thinks that technology has a negative effect on the way we use language.
Jennifer Levine's insight:

Professor Naomi Baron   is a Professor of Linguistics and Executive Director, Center for Teaching, Research and Learning, Department of Language and Foreign Studies American University, the article scooped is a compilation of questions about language and technology. Baron makes an interesting observation about how speed in which social media enables writing to take place has somehow made writing into an activity that is quick and essentially lacking the thought that the written word use to have. It seems like it is a catch-22. On the one hand social media language is creating a situation in which writing and communicating are constant and fast.  And on the other hand it is creating a situation in which because of speed, thoughtful reflection, refinement of ideas and the process of writing is suffering. Are we sacrificing in depth thinking and thought for speed and "off the cuff writing"? Is that the inadvertent reprecussion of technological advancements effect on language?

Baron further answers the question of how technology is changing the way we use language in this post: http://curiosity.discovery.com/question/technology-changing-language

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How Social Media is Affecting the Way We Speak and Write

How Social Media is Affecting the Way We Speak and Write | Special Topics Educ 5199 G What is Technology doing to Language? | Scoop.it
Do you speak “social?” There is a lot of writing out there about the effects of social media on business, marketing, branding and customer services.
Jennifer Levine's insight:

This blog entry provides and interesting insight into the use of Social Media and it's effects on the way we speak, write and behave. While reading this article I constantly came back to the idea of letter writing vs. email. The author asks the question of whether email has destroyed letter writing or just changed it? Granted, I do not know many people who write letters anymore, and almost everyone I know writes emails or texts. But isn't the premise the same? Hasn't technology just increased the speed in which we get the information across? Doesn't the language of Social Media reflect that speed? So, I ask is Social Media really changing language or with the aid of  technology are we just finding faster ways to express ourselves and as a result we have inadvertently created a dialect that conveys that need for a more speedier form of communication?

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The Impact of Social Media on the English Language | Media Badger | Intelligence & Research | Social Media

The Impact of Social Media on the English Language | Media Badger | Intelligence & Research | Social Media | Special Topics Educ 5199 G What is Technology doing to Language? | Scoop.it
English is always changing, arguably more so than ever in history. What is the impact of social media technologies on the English language, or other languages for that matter?
Jennifer Levine's insight:

For this scoop I would like to reflect on the questions posed at the end of the article. "Some key questions are raised with this issue; how different will the English language be in 15 years? Will it perhaps be more in line with Orwellian “newspeak” in 1984? Will we see more use of English in other languages and what do those issues portend? The majority of the text language and HTML used to build the Webs infrastructure is English-based and this continues".

 

I find it interesting that when asking the question how different will the English language be in 15 years? the author choses a rather short period of time to convey how rapidly the change might occur. This is definitly reflective of the speed  and reach of technology.  I already see some of this when hearing others speak in a forgein language. Often there is a smattering of english phrases for words that don't translate. Will there be a similar adaption for language of Social Media?

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Social Media’s Effect on Learning - Digits - WSJ

Social Media’s Effect on Learning - Digits - WSJ | Special Topics Educ 5199 G What is Technology doing to Language? | Scoop.it
Social media may seem, at times, to be a flurry of meaningless updates and marketing schemes, but researchers are figuring out how the interaction it spurs can stimulate brain activity.
Jennifer Levine's insight:

This article is based on a study by Patria Kuhl et al ( 2009) entitiled Neural Signatures of Phonetic Learning in Adulthood: A Magnetoencephalography Study  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2811417/. which discusses how "social interaction plays into learning languages".

This article further examines how the brain creates new pathways when learning a second language. It makes the argument that individuals who learn a second language are not "cognitively smarter" but rather "cognitively flexible" and that learning takes place through personal connections and high interactivity with the medium.  This is  is a kin to how one uses Social Media. The whole premise of Social media is to  promote interconnectivity, interaction and multitasking. This supports the argument that Social Media language is in fact a new language; and according to the article, due to ones interaction with social media they are making similar neural connections that a bilingual individual does. This is something that I would like to further explore.

 

Zhang, Y., Kuhl, P. K., Imada, T., Iverson, P., Pruitt, J., Stevens, E. B., Nemoto, I. (2009). Neural Signatures of Phonetic Learning in Adulthood: A Magnetoencephalography Study. NeuroImage, 46(1)226

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5 ways that social media benefits writing and language | Poynter.

Create. Inform. Engage. | Journalism training, media news & how to's
Jennifer Levine's insight:

This article mirrors many of the articles about the positives of social media and language. It mentions 5 key ideas: Increasing awareness of spelling mistakes, differentiates writing, spotlights short writing, reminds us that change is constant, creates new meanings. All of which have been touched on previoulsy. The term Neologism is mentioned and having never heard this word before I became intriqued. Neologism is a term borrowed from the french néologisme (1734) that means a newly coined term or phrase-, there are many different aspects to this term and can be found at this website. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neologism. It's amazing that a term coined from the mid 18th century is being used today describe 21st century learning tools. I wonder in a hundred years what terms will have survived.

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Texting, email and spellcheckers might be causing our language to shrink - Mother Nature Network

Texting, email and spellcheckers might be causing our language to shrink - Mother Nature Network | Special Topics Educ 5199 G What is Technology doing to Language? | Scoop.it
Mother Nature NetworkTexting, email and spellcheckers might be causing our language to shrinkMother Nature NetworkA new study has found that more words are going extinct and fewer words are being added to languages since the dawn of the digital age.

Via jean lievens
Jennifer Levine's insight:

This article looks at how the use of technology specifially, texting, email and spellcheckers are actually aiding in shrinking language. According to this article studies show that students are using more language , but not new words. In fact according to Bob Yirkais  (2012) study http://bit.ly/HSHqD5"; More words dying and fewer words being added to languages in digital age"  words are being dropped by languages and new ones are not being added fast enought to make up for the loss. Again, the irony being that the internet makes it quicker to introduce a word, but due to spellchecker and how language is changing ie: shorten text, words are not evolving as quick as they had in the past. It's interesting to note that the author points out that new words are usually formed from making mistakes and spellchecker software eliminates those mistakes, thus slowing the evolution of the word. It seems like a circular argument. Spellchecker helps us to correctly spell words, but it is in the mistakes that new words are formed. Spellchecker, autocorrect, spelling software is in every type of electronic medium ( Ironically, there is no spell checker in scoopit.) so, what does that mean for the future of words?

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LOL is its own language: Q&A with John McWhorter | TED Blog

LOL is its own language: Q&A with John McWhorter | TED Blog | Special Topics Educ 5199 G What is Technology doing to Language? | Scoop.it
Kids these days are “speaking” a new language, right under our noses and literally right under the table. But is texting making us dumber?
Jennifer Levine's insight:

I was first introduced to John McWhorter from a previous scoop entitled "How Social Media has Wrecked Language. Or Has It?" This article looked at the idea of  what McWhorter calls 'finger speech'. With that in mind I found this interview where Mcwhorter discusses his position on texting and language. In this article he discusses the idea of how texting is becoming a new language akin to a new social dialect. This is similar to dialects in specific communities. The words may sound different but they do not  replace the current english that we use in academic spheres.  He further mentions the idea of texting fluency and age and how the younger generation seems to try to text feeling. It might be interesting to further explore different generations use of texting language, different genders use of texting language, the ideas are endless. 

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Disruptions: Social Media Images Form a New Language Online

Disruptions: Social Media Images Form a New Language Online | Special Topics Educ 5199 G What is Technology doing to Language? | Scoop.it
The rising popularity of the image in social media has further transformed the way we share our lives with one another.
Jennifer Levine's insight:

After reading this article I was interested in the concept that pictures could be viewed as a language that exceeds language barriers. When I think of pictures I think of memories, ideas, explanation, but never have I thought of it as a language. I wonder how  an image could  covey comprehension, interpersonal communication? I agree that a picture can be worth a thousand words, but what words are those? What if the images that I am using to convey one message is getting lost in translation? Further, what impact would this have on teaching and learning?  I think that this might just be a way for google glass to sell more glasses.( Which by the way it mentions within the first paragraph).

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ijatcse02112012.pdf

Jennifer Levine's insight:

This study aims to convey the detrimental effects of technology on writing in teenagers. However, it further asserts that as a result of  social media language or speed writing,  student's are becoming increasingly socially isolated, have reduced their critical thinking skills, have poor proof reading and spelling skills, attention difficulties and do not think or write in a linear way. His suggestions for these issues is to give students more time to write in class and integegrate writing into other subjects. Upon reading all of the problems associated with social media language I wonder why using social media language isn't considered a health hazard. Is it not possible that there may be many other reasons why a  student would have poor grammatical skills, loss of attention and be socially isolated. Is it really possible to attribute all of these issues with 'netspeak'? I think that this study needs to be extended to address some other reasons for these issues.

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The Michener Institute - Best Experience, Best Education (EDIT TITLE WHEN THIS OCCURS)

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OMG! Illiterate Twitter Users Are Driving English Language Evolution, Says Study [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter

OMG! Illiterate Twitter Users Are Driving English Language Evolution, Says Study [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter | Special Topics Educ 5199 G What is Technology doing to Language? | Scoop.it
OMG! Illiterate Twitter Users Are Driving English Language Evolution, Says Study [INFOGRAPHIC]
Jennifer Levine's insight:

This is an interesting infographic based  on a study "from Brandwatch and mycleveragency". I have looked for this study but was redirected to a social media agency. I wondered about the validity of the study but found the infographic interesting. It focuses on twitter and how users are not using normal language conventions. However, it doesn't mention that with only 140 characters available to convey a message, creating a shortened language is necessary. It is interesting to note that what is being suggested in not uncommon, but it lacks validity due to a lack of referencing.

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How the net is changing language

How the net is changing language | Special Topics Educ 5199 G What is Technology doing to Language? | Scoop.it
'To Google' has become a universally understood verb and some countries are developing their own internet slang. But is everyone up to speed?
Jennifer Levine's insight:

This article suggests that although the internet is having a "significat" impact on language it is still to early to tell how deeply this will effect language. Longevity seems to be a key idea when it comes to language. And given that this technology has only been affecting language for about 20 years, I am wondering what the next 5 years might bring. I think maybe words might die out quicker than ever before.  Will it be a situation in which one is constantly trying to keep up with the changes and eventually, because of how rapidly language is changing we will reach a point where  we stop trying all together to constantly learn the new lingo? Imagine a language where from one day to the next many different words are added? Will that change how we define language?

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Ralph Fiennes blames Twitter for 'eroding' language - Telegraph

Ralph Fiennes blames Twitter for 'eroding' language - Telegraph | Special Topics Educ 5199 G What is Technology doing to Language? | Scoop.it
Ralph Fiennes, the English actor, said that social networking sites such as Twitter are dumbing down the English language.
Jennifer Levine's insight:

I debated  scooping this article, but was interested in a celebrities point of view of social media language. Most of what I see are celebrities using social media outlets like twitter and facebook to  create more exposure for themselves. In these mediums they are creating words , that due to their vast amount of followers , quickly becomes apart of our every day language. This article reports on how Ralph Fiennes view social media's , specifically twitter's  effect on langugage. Interestingly, it is important to note that Fiennes does not have a twitter account and does not use social media language, but has commented that in his experience it is eroding language. I think it's ironic that he is commenting on something that he has experienced through his  observations of a select few. Equally, ironic is that it is through social media that his view is being exposed to the main stream. I think maybe what he is saying is contextual in nature. He seems to be garnering his opinions from how drama students today, are interpreting Shakespeare. Admittedly, Shakespeare is difficult. However, I do not think that  it should be used as a barametor for whether or not an entire generation is being "dumbed down" due to social media language. When I think back to my high school moments with Shakespeare, it took me quite awhile to wrap my head around the ideas and lanugage that was presented in Shakespearian plays and I didn't have social media language to distract me. Is it really the technology or the material that is being presented that is stumping this generation?

 

This is the link to the book mentioned in the article http://www.amazon.com/Planet-Word Stephen-.Fry/dp/0718157745  It sounds like an interesting read.,

 

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OMG! The Impact of Social Media on the English Language « iMediaConnection Blog

OMG! The Impact of Social Media on the English Language « iMediaConnection Blog | Special Topics Educ 5199 G What is Technology doing to Language? | Scoop.it
Jennifer Levine's insight:

This article takes a closer look at how Social Media is being used by dictionaries to determine which words should be added. When reading this article I was struck by the phrase 'relevancy vs. credibility'. For something to be relevant it has to have a "connection to the matter at hand" http://www.thefreedictionary.com/relevant, for something to be credible it has to be "cabaple of being believed" http://www.thefreedictionary.com/credible. Therefore, using the public via Social Media to determine which words are both relevant and credible is an interesting idea. From previous scoops I have gleaned that previous to the internet it used to take aroune 30-50 years to add to a dictionary. This alone suggests that longevity of use was a factor in adding words, now it is a combination of  popularity of use and how the word has infiltrated the present vernacular. However,  given how fast words are being added, wouldn't also stand to reason that those very words will die out quicker, than those that have been around for 30-50 years?

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How Slang Affects Students in the Classroom

How Slang Affects Students in the Classroom | Special Topics Educ 5199 G What is Technology doing to Language? | Scoop.it
Are social media and text messaging negatively impacting high school students?
Jennifer Levine's insight:

Does Social Media language effect students? and if so how? Is this effect negative or positive. This article tries to present both views. According to one source, a high school educator, more and more students are presenting papers with Social Media language inbedded in them ie: acronyms, short sentences etc. This article suggests that it is up to the educators to insure that students understand when it is appropriate to use this Social Media language and when it is not.  When asked about college admission papers, one professor stated "Education is about adaptation to some degree. An intelligent, educated student coming out of high school should be adaptive. Those who do not adapt would [not be admitted]."

I have to believe that at some point we as educators have to trust that students, especially one's graduating from high school can make the distinction between what language is appropriate and what isn't. The question remains who is responsible if they can't make that distinction? Is it Social Media's effect on language learning or is it on the educators who have not helped them to make those distinctions?

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The Effects Of Social Media On How We Speak And Write

The Effects Of Social Media On How We Speak And Write | Special Topics Educ 5199 G What is Technology doing to Language? | Scoop.it
With 80 percent of teen Internet users frequenting social media sites, it’s no wonder our real world social lives are seeing some changes. Though some parents worry about a future of poor grammar a...
Jennifer Levine's insight:

This article explores different ways in which Social Media can effect how one reads and writes. Many of the items discussed have been mentioned in the articles that I have scooped. However, the one that stood out to me was the idea that within a Social Medial dialect, there are even more subdialects. For example, "each type of Social Media uses different types of writing" i.e: Twitter vs. Facebook vs. Emails vs. Blogs. This is interesting as it requires the user to not only know the language that each of these outlets require, but to also understand when it is appropriate to use each dialect. Participants have to be more engaged in the medium in order to communicate with it. Therefore, students who use Social Media are really communicating in not only another language, but also in a multitude of subdialects all the while still being able to communicate in their first language. This shows how the use of language is stretching and evolving and how students of today are not only keeping up, but exceeding expectations. Interesting!

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Txtng Is Killing Language. JK!!!

Does texting mean the death of good writing skills? John McWhorter posits that there’s much more to texting -- linguistically, culturally -- than it seems, and it’s all good news. John McWhorter studies how language has evolved -- and will evolve -- with social, historical and technological developments, in addition to studying and writing about race in America.

In recent work, he’s been urging grammarians to think of email and text messages not as the scourge of the English language but as 'fingered speech,' a new form between writing and talking. These digital missives, despite their 'shaggy construction,' represent an exciting new form of communication in which “lol' and 'hey' are particles, he suggests, and written thoughts can be shared at the speed of talking. Should we worry that knowing how to parse 'haha kk' means we'll lose the ability to read Proust? No, he told the TED Blog: 'Generally there’s always been casual speech and formal speech, and people can keep the two in their heads.'" |  via TED Talks


Via Todd Reimer
Jennifer Levine's insight:

In this Ted Talk McWhorter speaks about texting as a new language within itself. One that has it's own structure and rules. I found this particularly interesting as he equates texting language to that of "fingered speech". I never really though about the fact that when I speak I do not think about conventional grammar rules. Texting as speech that is facilitated through writing; the medium being technology, but at it's core it's a kin to oral communication? That is definitely an idea worth further exploration.

 

As well, I really enjoyed the scene where he speaks about how as far back as 68 A.D individuals have had difficulty with spelling and grammar and that it's not isolated to technology or the youth of today. It seems like with every generation language is evolving to adapt to their needs and someone somewhere views this change as a threat to language as a whole. Is language really being threatened? What exactly are we in danger of? If language changes what happens? I still haven't found one article, one study or one scoop that can answer these questions.

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The language of the future

The language of the future | Special Topics Educ 5199 G What is Technology doing to Language? | Scoop.it

Are you confused by words such as “LOL” or “tweet”? Are you #perturbed when #people use #’s on #certainwords? Get used to it. It turns out many of these phrases, acronyms, emoticons ;), all products of our social media age, are becoming part of accepted usage of language.

“Social media, email, all of our communication is faster today than it formally was,” said Peter Sokolowski, editor-at-large at Merriam-Webster Dictionary. “It used to take a word 20 to 50 years to be put in the dictionary. It evolves more quickly because our communication is faster now.”


Via Charles Tiayon
Jennifer Levine's insight:

This article looks at how social media language is changing the words that are added to the dictionary. The idea that previous to the internet "it used to take a word 20-50 years to be put in the dictionary" and now due to the rate of exposure a word can get through the internet a word can become apart of the dictionary that much quicker. It is interesting that the public has more of a role than ever in what constitutes a word. If we take this further and really investigate who makes what popular I would have to bring forth the idea of celebrity influence on cultural and by extension celebrity influence on language. Recently, the word Twerking was added to the dictionary http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/relationships/twerk-and-selfie-added-to-english-dictionary/article13994380/. Although the word has been around for at least 20 years, due to Mylie Cyrus's infamous MTV moment it is now in the dictionary.  http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/twerk?q=twerking.  This is one example of how social media and the language which has evolved can have an enormous effect on language evolution.

 

 

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How Social Media Has Wrecked Language. Or Has It?

How Social Media Has Wrecked Language. Or Has It? | Special Topics Educ 5199 G What is Technology doing to Language? | Scoop.it
Social media has shortened our communications and changed how we relate to each other.
Jennifer Levine's insight:

I liked how this article is from the persceptive of a 30 something mom. This idea of texting because calling takes to much time was an interesting idea. I have that very conversation with my husband when my friends text me. "Won't a phone call suffice? you can get all of the information out in one go". Theoretically, yes he is correct, you can. And texting or what John McWorther calls "Fingered Speech", http://www.wired.com/business/2013/03/texting-isnt-writing-its-fingered-speech/, allows me to be short and concise.  As for communication, I think that it is interesting how we adapted so quickly to the new language of texting. I find it astounding how quickly we are  able to quickly adopt LOL, TTYL, ROFL, into our. If this is in fact a new language what makes it so easy to learn? Is it the technology , the popularity? Perhaps it is the combination of the two that allows us to adapt so quickly.

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Infographic: Does Texting Hurt Your Grammar? - SocialTimes

Infographic: Does Texting Hurt Your Grammar? - SocialTimes | Special Topics Educ 5199 G What is Technology doing to Language? | Scoop.it
The same social networking tools that bring us together may also be destroying our language. A recent study suggests that the more kids text, the less they learn about proper grammar.

Via HighPoint IELTS Prep
Jennifer Levine's insight:

I read this infographic and found a lot of 'may's' and not enough facts. For example, students  "may have trouble switching back to traditional grammar" and "may rob kids of a fundamental understanding of structural grammar". There are no references that support these claims and therefore I am not sure where the information is coming from. As well, I looked for the globe and mail article that is referred to but has no title, and could not find one article that alludes to the idea that texting is 'killing' college kid's grammar". In fact I found 2 articles that state just the opposite: The dumbest generation? No, Twitter is making kids smarter  by Clive Thomson

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/how-new-digital-tools-are-making-kids-smarter/article14321886/  and GR8 news: We're entering a new era of literacy by Erin Anderssen http://www.theglobeandmail.com/technology/gr8-news-were-entering-a-new-era-of-literacy/article4295890/  both written before this inforgraphic was published. I think that on the whole I see where the author is coming from , but have to disagree with the idea that students don't have the ability to understand the difference between academic expectations and social language. I feel this infographic makes today's generation seem incabable of making this distinction and wished this author included a more balance approach.

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