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A Detailed Visual Guide To Distributed Project-Based Learning - Edudemic

A Detailed Visual Guide To Distributed Project-Based Learning - Edudemic | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
In an effort to help those teachers out, Katie and I found a fabulous new visual diagram that's all about which apps and tools go with the different parts of distributed project-based learning.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 1, 2013 8:00 AM

This infographic looks at Project Based Learning (PBL) and divides it into three main sections:

* Organize and co-ordinate work

* Build background knowledge & inspire

* Co-design *making*

The second and third areas are then decided to more clearly deliniate the areas each covers. The last final two sections provide more specific concepts of what it required and also one or more suggestions of tech tools that will assist the process. There are additional groupings as shown in the infographic above.

More and more teachers are engaging in some form of PBL and this visual may serve as a great base to help create a strong foundation and provide ideas of technology tools that might assist in the process.

Chris Carter's curator insight, August 1, 2013 11:53 AM

Gets better with each look.

JennaMRyan's curator insight, November 27, 2013 3:04 PM

http://www.edudemic.com/a-detailed-visual-guide-to-distributed-project-based-learning/

 

I really like this resources because it shows where students are getting information for their projects.  The projects are learned through resources that are distributed across many different fields, websites, and search engines.  This allows students to engage in many different types of content curation sites.  Google and skype are a few examples of resources.  The visual is broken up into instant learning and coalitious segments showing how some sites are good for overlapping purposes.  This is an interesting view of PBL sources.

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Why We Changed Our Model of the “8 Essential Elements of PBL” | Blog | Project Based Learning | BIE

Why We Changed Our Model of the “8 Essential Elements of PBL” | Blog | Project Based Learning | BIE | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
BIE’s Essential Project Design Elements contain two new items, both of which are familiar to those who know PBL. One is “authenticity,” which has to do with how real-world the project is. The other is “reflection,” which we have previously coupled with “revision” but now stands on its own; students should reflect on what they’re learning, how they’re learning, and what they have accomplished in a project.

Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, May 27, 1:25 AM

Useful article for anyone interested in Project Based Learning.

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30 Tips to Cultivate Soft Skills in Your Students

30 Tips to Cultivate Soft Skills in Your Students | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it

"Preparing students for successful careers is a major part of every educator's job, but most preservice and professional development programmes don't cover the skills employers are currently seeking - things like 'emergent' leadership, adaptability, humility and ownership."

Illustration above by Linda Tieu.


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, May 2, 5:29 PM

We so often hear of the 21st century skills our learners need? Common Core tells us that learners need to be critical thinkers/problem solvers, communicators, collaborators and creators. What skills are employers looking for? More than just the four Cs.

This post by InformEd provides background based on what employers say they need as well as 30 tips to teach soft skills. Four tips (quoted) are below.

* Demonstrate alternate paths to content mastery.

* Start grading students on how well they listen to their peers.

* Assign group exercises that give people the opportunity to speak, listen, write, organize and lead.

* Design opportunities for students to build and demonstrate resilience.

There are many more tips in this post. Click through to learn more.

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4 game-based tests changing the face of assessments

4 game-based tests changing the face of assessments | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Educational games are offering teachers new tools for monitoring student learning.
Kathy Lynch's insight:

These could be useful for anyone. These are life skills that certain students stumble over. Now we have a fun way to help them with out lectures… problem solving, negative feedback, ratios, and stress responses.

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Encouraging Metacognition for Learning

Encouraging Metacognition for Learning | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it

A critical component of learning is the ability to reflect on one’s
learning and the processes that occur while we are engaged in learning. If we are to develop independent, empowered learners then we need to build the skills required for metacognition both directly through the provision of suitable strategies and indirectly via the modeling of effective learning that we provide.


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Chris Carter's curator insight, June 22, 1:36 PM

The "Ladder of Feedback" alone is worth the look.

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Top 10 Evidence Based Teaching Strategies

Top 10 Evidence Based Teaching Strategies | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Evidence based teaching strategies have a far larger effect on student results than others do. Discover the top ten, evidence based teaching strategies in this article.

Via Michelle Randolph
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[Infographic] Using Google Tools in Project-Based Learning

[Infographic] Using Google Tools in Project-Based Learning | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Project-based learning is a dynamic approach in which students actively explore real-world problems and challenges and acquire a deeper knowledge. Project-based learning should be student-driven, with a real-world connection. It should be core to learning, include structured collaboration, and have a multifaceted assessment. Giving students a real problem to solve, getting them engaged in their work, having them work with others, and assessing their work with more than just a grade sounds a lot like how many things in the ‘real world’ work, doesn’t it? After all, aren’t we trying to prepare students for the world after school?

Many of the digital tools used in classrooms are made especially for education. This is a great thing in many ways, but if you can integrate tools that students will also encounter in the real world, that should be considered a bonus, too. So why not dig deep into your Google Toolkit and build your project based learning tasks to use these tools? The Using Google Tools in Project-Based Learning Infographic presents how teachers can use google apps in project-based learning to streamline learning and processes and bring a wealth of information to their students’ fingertips.

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Kathy Lynch's curator insight, June 21, 1:29 PM

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A Simple Idea That Just Might Revolutionize Education - Brilliant or Insane

A Simple Idea That Just Might Revolutionize Education - Brilliant or Insane | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Education has a monumental problem that has lasted for centuries. Four simple words can solve the problem and revolutionize education.
Kathy Lynch's insight:

Thx Great Feedback tool. I've formatively assessed…Now what do I do?

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Principles of Instructional Design

Principles of Instructional Design | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it

Instructional design (ID) is based on three psychological principles of learning: behavioral, cognitive and constructivist. Behavioral psychology advocates repetition and reinforcement in learning material to create a “behavior” in the learner. Cognitive psychology focuses on engaging the learner’s senses to create a learning process, while constructivism emphasizes the learner’s own experience and personal interpretation.

To create a solid foundation for delivering these principles, learning materials should:

* Present content.
* Guide the learner in practice.
* Provide for independent practice by the learner.
* Assess how well the learner is doing.

And be supported by interactivity between learner and program, and the motivation of the learner.

Skilled instructional designers know that the learning content shouldn’t become secondary to the technology that delivers it. They also activate prior learning, demonstrate what’s new, give learners opportunities to apply their new learning, and integrate current with previous learning.

In my previous post, I introduced Frank Troha‘s eight-question approach to ID. Now let’s look at some more models.


Via Miloš Bajčetić
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A Visual on Learning Progression

A Visual on Learning Progression | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it

Great learning progression visual.


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 15, 10:23 PM

Take a look at this visual that describes the learning progression. It looks at three questions as the starting point:

* What's the learning outcome for the lesson?

* How will I know if students have achieved it?

* How will I check if students have achieved it?

A variety of ideas are shared for each of these questions...short and sweet, and great for visual learners.

Ra's curator insight, June 18, 6:16 AM

Great graphic for teachers to identify the strength of their learning intentions and outcomes.

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[Infographic] Blended Learning and the teaching profession

[Infographic] Blended Learning and the teaching profession | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it

If you’ve ever been interested in exploring and utilizing blended learning. we’ve got a launchpad for you. This terrific infographic from Digital Learning Now explores the ins and outs of blended learning, how it works, and what it can do to benefit kids in modern classrooms today.

After the infographic, you can check out the video for even more information on maximizing blended learning practices in your classroom. And feel free to share with our community you own blended learning experiences in the comments below!


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7 Tips To Beat Short Attention Spans In eLearning - eLearning Industry

7 Tips To Beat Short Attention Spans In eLearning - eLearning Industry | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
How To Beat Short Attention Spans In eLearning. Check 7 tips to beat Short Attention Spans in eLearning, so that you can design eLearning courses that stick

Via Chris Carter
Kathy Lynch's insight:

Thx Chris Carter! What a great summary of how to put together a good, engaging course, "e" or not. 

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Chris Carter's curator insight, May 26, 8:29 PM

Sorry for the late post ... I got distracted.

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4 Steps to Real Learning Infographic - e-Learning Infographics

4 Steps to Real Learning Infographic - e-Learning Infographics | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
The 4 Steps to Real Learning Infographic presents 4 steps a teacher can do today to help make learning more real, along with practical suggestions.
Kathy Lynch's insight:

Concrete ways to up the interest and rea-life connections for students

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How Big Is Space – Interactive version

How Big Is Space – Interactive version | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Buckle up and ride a rocket through our interactive view of the Solar System to explore our cosmic neighbourhood

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 9, 10:37 PM

BBC has released another great interactive infographic which allows you to travel through space and learn just how big it is. You begin your trip with blasting off earth and at 6.1 km you will pass the start of the high cloud layer....continue through the stratosphere to the mesosphere to the thermosphere and beyond. After a very long journey you will reach the edges of our solar system, where you will be told "It would take you about 23 million years of continuous scrolling on this scale to get to the farthest regions of the observable universe..."

The distance of our solar system is vast, and this interactive may help our learners begin to understand just how vast it is.

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12 Rules Of Great Teaching -

12 Rules Of Great Teaching - | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it

"Recently, I’ve been thinking of the universal truths in teaching. Students should be first. Don’t always start planning with a standard. Questions matter more than answers."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, May 15, 6:10 AM

If you were to put together 12 rules that make a teacher a great teacher what would they include? Sit back and think about that, and then look at this post by Terry Heick, where he shares the rules he has come up with as well as the reasons for the rule. A few are listed above, and three more are below.

* Start small.

* In learning, curiosity is everything.

* Help students ask great questions.

Click through to the post to read through all his rules and find a bonus of three additional rules that you may want to add. You will also find links for resources for three of the rules.

LibrarianLand's curator insight, May 15, 9:07 AM

Speaking as someone new to teaching, there's an awful lot to consider. In a nutshell, be knowledgeable about your subject, be flexible, be up on technology, learning styles, and put students first.

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8 Things to Look For in Today's Classroom

8 Things to Look For in Today's Classroom | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
As I think that leaders should be able to describe what they are looking for in schools I have thought of eight things that I really want to see in today's classroom.  I really believe that classro...

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Simon Awuyo's curator insight, May 24, 3:16 AM

I will look for them. i am on my way to give  support supervision to my student teachers. 

TWCLibrary's curator insight, May 25, 7:55 PM

Good insight and suggestions to achieve this

Ajo Monzó's curator insight, June 25, 2:36 AM

Clear and easy to understand!

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Using SAMR to Teach Above the Line - Getting Smart by Susan Oxnevad - 1:1 program, Apple, edchat, EdTech, SAMR, technology

Using SAMR to Teach Above the Line - Getting Smart by Susan Oxnevad - 1:1 program, Apple, edchat, EdTech, SAMR, technology | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
The SAMR model is a useful tool for helping teachers think about their own tech use as they begin to make small shifts in the design and implementation of technology driven learning experiences to achieve the next level.
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Why The Maker Movement Matters - @Venspired

Why The Maker Movement Matters - @Venspired | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
I get caught up in things. Informercials. New gadgets. New shades of Sharpie. Every kid I’ve ever taught has said, “You say EVERYTHING is your “favorite thing.” It’s true. Life? It’s my favorite. I grew up, but my internal excitement level has stayed at a five year old’s level. So, I’ll just preface this post with that. I will also say that I’ve held off on writing this. Long enough to figure out if this whole “maker movement” was another “thing I love,” or more. It’s more. So much more.

Via John Evans
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Donna Rosenberger's curator insight, June 23, 1:01 PM

Inspiring Creativity should be a goal of every teacher.

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15 Ways to Deepen Your Formative Assessment Practice

15 Ways to Deepen Your Formative Assessment Practice | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it

Once we know what the process looks like and we’ve tested a few simple approaches in our classrooms, it’s time to work it to its full potential. Try some of these formative assessment strategies. They’ll help you deepen your practice.
Involve learners in the formative assessment process

1. Ask them to name the learning target and tell you how they know they’ve met it.

2. Help kids establish habits of documentation, and then teach them how to self-assess.

3. Invite your students to plot their own data, analyze the findings, and theorize in ways that will promote further learning.

4. Require reflection before, during, and after learning.

Become a visible learning champion

5. Define the learning targets.

6. Determine where learners will attend to the target most explicitly during the learning experience.

7. Consider how students might make the learning relevant to this target visible, and invite them to do so.

8. Document this learning using print, audio, and visual recordings.

9. Study the data you gather, looking for trends.

10. Use the theories that emerge to inform your feedback, your own learning, and theirs’ as well.
Find some critical friends

11. Seek out colleagues with diverse perspectives, and invite them to analyze your assessment findings.

12. Ask them into your classroom to provide feedback on your formative assessment practices.

13. Establish or widen your professional learning network, and ask those well outside your system to add perspective to your practice, your findings, and your intended interventions.

14. Study how others approach formative assessment.

15. Hook yourself up with those who have true expertise in data and assessment, and learn everything you can about quality analysis.


Via Miloš Bajčetić
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Thx @Miloš Bajčetić

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Pull, don’t push, employee learning

Pull, don’t push, employee learning | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it

As the digital revolution continues to fuel the faster rate of change, transforming all aspects of business, from supply chain management to communication, the highest-performing corporations are abandoning traditional “push” training for the “pull” learning model.

Push training is a centralized, top-down model that occurs when management determines what it is people need to know or do and ‘pushes’ educational programs out from a central training group. It’s going to a class or taking an assigned online program.

“In a push training model, learning is test-based. It is all about what you know."


Via Edumorfosis
Kathy Lynch's insight:

Thx Edumorfosi.it While this is business-based, it can apply easily to teacher training and a student-centered classroom

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The Best Resources For Learning About Formative Assessment

The Best Resources For Learning About Formative Assessment | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
(Thumbs are one of my favorite forms of formative assessment) Be sure to read my Ed Week column, Ways to Include Students in the Formative Assessment Process. As the new school year approaches (we ...
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10 Tips For Effective Problem-Based Learning: The Ultimate Instructional Solution

10 Tips For Effective Problem-Based Learning: The Ultimate Instructional Solution | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Problem-based learning (PBL) was first introduced to the field of education in the 1960s by medical education specialist Howard Barrows, who argued that

Via Beth Dichter
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Always wondered… Thx Beth Dichter

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, May 25, 8:00 AM

When you read or hear the words PBL do you think Problem-Based Learning or Project-Based Learning? This post discusses problem-based learning, and provides a historical background before discussing defining it. .The post then compares problem-based learning with project-based, inquiry-based and case-based learning before moving on to provide ten recommendations. Three are below.

* Clearly define your purpose for doing problem-based learning

* Develop ill-structured problems

* Emphasize depth over breadth

To learn more about these three recommendations and view the other seven click through to the post. You may find that problem-based learning is already being used do some degree with your learners, and this post may provide some ideas on how to move into this direction more efficiently.

TWCLibrary's curator insight, May 25, 7:52 PM

History and examples of PBL and differences between inquiry learning and RBL

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Learning How to Read Needs to Be More Hands-On. No, Really. - GOOD

Learning How to Read Needs to Be More Hands-On. No, Really. - GOOD | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Two years ago, the Albermarle County school system in Charlottesville, Virginia, moved forward with a rather bold experiment: They abandoned traditional explicit instruction in all summer school classrooms, replacing classic lesson plans with student-directed summer making programs, run as part of Maker Ed's Maker Corps program—an educational subset of the “maker movement” (a widespread cultural push to teach both kids and adults more hands-on and do-it-yourself skills). 

Via John Evans
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Universal Design for Learning

Introduction to the three principles of Universal Design for Learning from students' point of view.

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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, December 2, 2013 1:22 AM

A very insightful snapshot of UDL principles...teachers and students take a look!

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Instructional Design Models And Theories: The Cognitive Flexibility Theory - eLearning Industry

Instructional Design Models And Theories: The Cognitive Flexibility Theory - eLearning Industry | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Instructional Design Models And Theories: The Cognitive Flexibility Theory. The Cognitive Flexibility Theory, introduced by Spiro, Feltovich, and Coulson.

Via Chris Carter
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Thx Chris Carter!

One part of the message is relevancy first so that students can hook the new knowledge to their personal pre-existing framework. This not only speaks to  adult learners with varying backgrounds, but also for a diverse classroom  of students with various needs and differing strengths. Solution: create a brief background statement to "on ramp" students whether they recognize, remember, or have no recall of the material. Then provide a reason for them to want to learn about it  and show them how to use it. As put here: the why and how to apply.

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Chris Carter's curator insight, May 31, 4:35 AM
Works for me!
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Help Students Close Read Iconic Images

Help Students Close Read Iconic Images | Special Science Classroom | Scoop.it
Every day news images flood our print publications, digital spaces and social media apps. Why do some become iconic and unforgettable?

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
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Thx Susan Grigsby

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Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby's curator insight, May 13, 2:05 PM

I love the suggestions in this article to build close-reading skills among students using visual images. This goes beyond the story starter idea!

Kimberly Brosan's curator insight, May 13, 3:10 PM

The suggestions in this article on how to teach students to read images were really helpful. I especially like that there's a recommendation for the NYTimes Learning Network's feature "What's Going on in This Picture?' http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/category/lesson-plans/whats-going-on-in-this-picture/

Larissa Bonthorne's curator insight, May 13, 7:03 PM

This article discusses techniques that would be useful for Year 7-12 English students analysing a picture or cartoon.  Other links are provided.