Special Education
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Rescooped by Abby Moran from Special Education
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Special ed, general ed students increasingly sharing sports field

Special ed, general ed students increasingly sharing sports field | Special Education | Scoop.it
The tutors in Meaghann Mulrow's special education class at Mountain View High School have learned firsthand about the challenges that special needs students encounter each day.

Via Julie Newman
Abby Moran's insight:

This article was very touching. I have read articles that talk about integrating disabled students with non-disabled students but I have never read about specific examples detailing these actions until now. At Mountain View High School, juniors and seniors tutor disabled students. The students not only tutor them in academic aspects, but they also play sports with them. They play basketball, run track and bowl together. Even though the concept of general education students and special education students competing together in Special Olympics isn't new, it has started to become more prevalent. Disabled students are able to learn from general education students but the most important aspect is that general education students are able to learn from disabled students as well.  One student admitted, "It opened my eyes, I don't judge people on how they appear very much anymore." This was truly amazing to me. I never got to experience such programs in high school but I truly believe that I, as well as many other students, would have benefitted a great deal from these programs. Another student even included the idea that special education students are truly a lot more independent than people perceive them to be. This once again made me realize that there are many false stereotypes regarding disabled students. The last quote of the article really stuck with me. A student stated, ""I really have a pet peeve against the word 'retarded'. If you guys could be in here and see these kids, you would never use it." In high school, we made a pledge to ban the "r" word. This is so significant to me and I think all students need to realize this. This article ultaimtely proves the benefits associated with combining general education students with disabled students. The most amazing part is that they both learn from each other, the feeling is extrmely mutual. 

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Julie Newman's curator insight, December 9, 2013 5:18 PM

This article discusses a program at Mountain View High School that partners a junior or senior general education "tutor" with a special education student. These tutors act as a peer buddy to the special education student. Throughout this program, tutors can help their buddy with academics, but they also partner with them in athletics. Tutors and their buddies are able to take part in the Special Olympics unified program, which allows them to compete in the organizations seasonal sports alongside their special needs buddies. This article explains how mutually beneficial this program has become for both the general education tutors and their special education buddies. One senior was quoted saying "i don't judge people on how they appear very much anymore". Similarly, the program has shown that for special needs students, sometimes being shown how to do something by a peer, rather than an adult, can show more success. I rally enjoyed reading this article because I think it shows that although these students need to be placed in a different classroom and curriculum due to their special needs, it does not mean that they cannot associate with general education students and feel as though they are still part of the school as a whole. While I think that the benefits for special education students is outstanding, I feel as though this is one of the first programs to appear in my research to educate the rest of the student body on special needs. I believe that educating general education students on special needs is of the upmost importance to lead them to be well-rounded citizens once they graduate High School. The reason I love this program is because the general education students are not learning about disabilities through a textbook, causing them not to care. Instead, these students are learning by interacting one-on-one with special education students, creating a more impactful learning experience. 

Rescooped by Abby Moran from Dyslexia, Dyspraxia, ADD, ADHD, LD, Autism (etc. conspiracy labels out there) Education Tools & Info
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Trends in Special Education Infographic | e-Learning Infographics

Trends in Special Education Infographic | e-Learning Infographics | Special Education | Scoop.it
Check the Special Education Trends Infographic to learn about the history of special education and how students with learning disabilities have become able to participate in normal activities with their peers.

Via Collection of First
Abby Moran's insight:

This timeline displays the problems and successes within special education throughout histroy. I have continually read articles detailing the problems of budgets cuts or detailing the importance of advanced technology in the field of special education, but I have never read anything that mapped out the history of special education in the way that this article did. I was shocked when I have realized how far we've come but how much we still need to work on. Children with special needs used to be considered outcasts and they were completely abandoned. Today, 96 percent of children with disabilities are educated in regular public schools- this translates to 6.7 million students! Students with disabilites are now more integrated into regular classrooms in order to prove that they truly are just like everyone else. We need to appreciate how far we truly have come but we also need to focus on making sure the future is successful as well. Due to tight budgets, programs have been eliminated and special education teachers have been laid off. This is truly unacceptable. Program reforms are needed in order to combat the issue of budget and teacher cuts. In addition, the timeline mentions the increased use of technology. As displayed in many of the other blogs and articles, technology really allows children with special needs to blossom and develop. Some of them might not be able to write, but technology (such as the iPad) allows them to type and so on. Laslty, it's extremely essential to integrate students with disabilties with non-disabled students. This way, all students are inherently equal and treated the same. Overall, I was fascinated by this timeline. I learned a lot about the successes and failures of education and I am aware that we need to keep working on these issues in order to produce the desired result that this field truly deserves. 

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Denver Leigh Watson, M.Ed, LDTC's curator insight, December 18, 2013 8:01 AM

I love these graphics!  #Visual leaner to a fault! 

Nichelle Plivelic's comment, February 20, 2014 6:33 PM
Today, all children have a right to an education, even those with special needs. However, this wasn't always the case. In ancient Rome, these children were not seen positively. In fact, the Romans believed that if a child was born with some kind of disability, it was a sign that the gods were angry. Later in history, in colonial America, it was difficult to educate a child with special needs because they would either be home schooled or parents had to pay for a private education. Luckily, changes occurred throughout history that made things far easier for these kids. One major change was when the Connecticut Asylum at Hartford for the Instruction of Deaf and Dumb Persons opened in 1817. In 1829, children who had trouble with vision could attend the New England Asylum for the Blind. Within a year, the enrollment at the former jumped from 7 to 33. At the latter, enrollment jumped from 6 to 60 within a decade.
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CEC to White House Officials: Budget Cuts are Threatening Special Education Services. Continue to Share Your Stories! (CEC Policy Insider)

CEC to White House Officials: Budget Cuts are Threatening Special Education Services. Continue to Share Your Stories! (CEC Policy Insider) | Special Education | Scoop.it
CEC staff met today with officials from the White House Domestic Policy Council, Office of Management and Budget, and U.S. Department of Education to share how budget cuts have impacted children, schools and communities.
Abby Moran's insight:

When first reading this article, I was shocked. I knew that budget cuts impacted schools but I wasn't aware that budget cuts were significantly impacting special education services and students. The Council for Exceptional Children conducted a survey and are putting data together for more than 1,000 special educators from every state. The survey ultimately expressed their concerns about budget cuts. According to the article, federal budget cuts "slashed over 600 million from special education programs last year alone." This statistic really upsets me because 600 million dollars is a ton of money and this money is necessary to keep the programs functioning. In my opinion, these programs are so important. It's essential for schools to positively affect these students because they deserve support just like all other students in this country. Without these programs, how will students grow and develop? The end of the article expresses the need for families, students, schools and educators to share their stories and provide data on the impact of budget cuts. I hope individuals take this situation very seriously and express their concern. Special education programs provide wonderful opportunities for students with disabilties and should be funded.

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Special education tips: Benefits of project-based learning - by Dr Pandula Siribaddana - Helium

Project-based learning (PBL or PjBL) is a teaching tool that can be incorporated in classroom practices as an alternative to traditional teacher c..., Dr Pandula Siribaddana (News line -Special education tips: Benefits of project-based learning - ...
Abby Moran's insight:

Special needs children benefit greatly from project-based learning compared to typical classroom learning. Specifically, project-based learning meets the needs of those with special needs. The article highlights the benefits of project-based learning including: felxibility; development of meta-cognition; a multiple-intelligence approach; abilties are taken into account. Since some students with special needs can't necessarily learn the same way as others, it's important for teachers to take this into consideration and focus on ways to help these students learn and succeed. I think it's so important that we are finding more and more ways to help special needs students. They deserve the same chance to learn as every other individual and I think it's great that new techniques are being implemented. 

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Julie Newman's comment, December 10, 2013 7:53 PM
I really enjoyed this article because I feel as though it does a great job at understanding how special needs students learn differently, and working to adapt to these learning difficulties. I agree with Abby in her point that all students deserve the same chance to learn, no matter their ability, so finding other methods of teaching to help students accomplish these goals is of the upmost importance.
Rescooped by Abby Moran from Special Education News
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Pro Infirmis «Because who is perfect?»

Disabled mannequins will be eliciting astonished looks from passers-by on Zurich's Bahnhofstrasse today. Between the perfect mannequins, there will be figure...

Via Dennis P. Garland
Abby Moran's insight:

Even though this video doesn't display people with disabilties in an educational setting, it displays people with disabilties around the world. I thought that the video was simply amazing and I was truly inspired by the video. Before watching it, I had never thought about people with special needs being represented by mannequins. Typically, mannequins display skinny, tall and fit individuals. However, is that really what our society is composed of? One body type and one typical look? The answer is no. Just because the people in the video are disabled doesn't mean that they are different or not normal. The people in the video are just like eveyone else and are unique in their own way. The video displayed many people with different forms of disabilities and a mannequin was made for each one. It was truly amazing to witness these individuals reactions. They were thrilled and one woman mentioned that it was so nice to finally see someone who looks like her in a store window. This video really opened up my eyes to the extreme discrimination faced by individuals with disabilties. When people walked by the store, they stared at the mannequins and were confused as to why they looked that way. In our society, we should completely accept people with disabilties. No one is perfect and everyone should realize that. This video then made me think about people with disabilities in the school setting. If disabled people don't feel represented in society, how will they ever feel welcome in a school setting? School should become a comfortable place for students since they esentially are in school for at least 12 years of their life. Overall, I've realized the true need for people with diasbilties to feel welcome, accepted and comfortable in society.

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Rescooped by Abby Moran from Implementing Common Core Standards in Special Education
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7 Ways to Adapt the Common Core Standards for Students with Special Needs

7 Ways to Adapt the Common Core Standards for Students with Special Needs | Special Education | Scoop.it
The establishment of Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for students nationwide represents a particularly robust challenge for teachers of students with special needs.

Via Beth Panitz, Ed.D.
Abby Moran's insight:

The establishment of common core standards is such a large topic in education today. However, before reading this, I had never thought about the ways that the common core standards would affect students with special needs. The article mentions the two sides to the topic. Advocates for students with special needs have made it clear that these students should "be held to the same high level of achievement as typically developing students." In essence, students with special needs should be treated equally to other students in an academic as well as in a non-academic sense. However, some students may possess disabilties that may make it difficult for them to meet certain standards. I understand both sides of the issue. Students with disabilities should be held to the same standards if possible. The article provides 7 ways to adapt the standards in order to meet the needs of students with special needs. These tips include: provide alternative means of expression, utilize the students interests, employ alternative texts, use assitive technologies and Universal Design for Learning tools, engage the student's strengths, pair the student with a typically developing student and modify the environment. I think these tips are actually very beneficial and I understand their importance. From being in the classroom this semester, I've witnessed the common core curriculum in action. It's said to be difficult for the teacher as well as the students. Since these standards are so difficult, it's necessary to work with special needs students so they don't fall behind. This way, they are expected to meet the same standards as other students while receiving support and accomodation. 

 

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Beth Panitz, Ed.D.'s curator insight, November 20, 2013 8:09 PM

Seven ways to help educators provide flexible means through which students with special needs can master the Common Core State Standards while still maintaining high expectations for achievement.

Julie Newman's comment, December 10, 2013 7:50 PM
Similar to Abby, I have had the chance to see the common core standards in action through my placement this semester. I have witnessed how hard it is for these standards to be accomplished in the regular classroom, so I can only imagine how hard it could be to implement in a special needs classroom. While theoretically I want to say that all special needs children should be held to the same standards as regular students, I do not feel as though this is viable. Special needs students fall on a wide range, so yes, some of these students may be able to adhere to these standards once the changes mentioned in this article were made. However, to say that all special needs students can accomplish these standards after alterations I feel is not fair to say. Some special needs students need different standards all their own to adhere to their personal struggles academically regarding their disability.
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Watch An Entire Team Of Teenage Football Players Do Something Very Unexpected

Watch An Entire Team Of Teenage Football Players Do Something Very Unexpected | Special Education | Scoop.it
I'm not saying you're going to cry. But if you're prone to that sort of thing, have some tissues handy.
Abby Moran's insight:

I came across this video on my Facebook newsfeed multiple times and decided to watch it. I have now watched it three times and am left with tears each time I've watched it. I think this video is so signifcant and shows the true beauty of children's acceptance. Even though Keith has learning disabilities, the football team took him in as one of their own. In order to make Keith feel special, they handed him the ball at the one yard line so he could receive his first touchdown. What amazed me is that these students were middle school students. In my opinion, middle school is a time of cliques, gossip, bullies etc. However, to my surprise, these boys scheemed and conspired in between classes and went behind their coaches backs in order to make Keith happy. One of the players admits, "It was to make someone's day, to make someone's week. To make them happy." In addition, another player stated, "We wanted to do something for him because we wanted to prove that he was part of our team and meant a lot to us." Sometimes students exclude special needs students because they are different and unlike everyone else. However, these boys were able to realize what a special person Keith was; It didn't matter that he had learning disabilites, he was just like them. I hope that all children will learn to value each individual, despite their differences. 

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Edmodo Motivates Special Education Students to Communicate

Edmodo Motivates Special Education Students to Communicate | Special Education | Scoop.it
Edmodo provides students with communication disorders safe ways to confidently interact with their teachers and peers.
Abby Moran's insight:

I highly recommend this article! I thought it was so touching! The article details the isolation that some special education students feel due to their disabilities or exceptionalities. Students with communication disorders may have a lot to say but may not be able to express their thoughts and emotions. When reading this article, I tried to imagine how frustrating that truly would be. Luckily some teachers are introducing Edmodo to their students! Edmodo provides a chance for students to interact with each other outside the school day. The students engage in online conversations and express what they're doing, how they are feeling, what they think about certain things etc. The article emphasizes the true power of digital technology! This opened my eyes to the new opportunities for children with special needs. I was not aware that such programs existed and it made me happy that people are finding things that will benefit these types of students. 

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