Special Education- Aspect 2
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Genetics advances and learning disability

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Natalie Colcombe's comment, April 3, 2014 6:15 PM
Intelligence has a basis of genetic inheritance, so it is natural that some learning disabilities are the same way. Genetics do play a role in learning disabilities. However, this is a complex area of science because there are so many types and degrees of severity of learning disabilities. While learning disabilities tend to run in the family, their expression differs from parent to child. A child's learning disability probably takes a slight different form than a parent's. It is unlikely that a learning disorder is inherited directly. Rather, what is inherited is a subtle brain disfunction that can lead to a learning disability.
Natalie Colcombe's comment, April 3, 2014 6:59 PM
More men than women have learning disabilities. This mainly due to the existance of x-linked disorders. The extra x chromosome that females have can cover up the expression of some disorders, which is why females have less learning disabilities than males.
Natalie Colcombe's comment, April 3, 2014 7:54 PM
However, environment is also a big factor in the causes of learning disabilities. Understanding the causes of learning disabilities can help us understand them better as well as possible cures and prevention methods. The relationship between genetics and learning disabilities is becoming more apparent.
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Learning Disabilities

Learning Disabilities | Special Education- Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
Learning disabilities affect the brain's ability to receive, process, analyze, or store information. These problems can make it difficult for a student to learn as quickly as others - but they have nothing to do with a person's intelligence.
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Natalie Colcombe's comment, April 3, 2014 8:32 PM
There are thought to be many causes of learning disorders. A few theories are. Genetic influences. Experts have noticed that learning disabilities tend to run in families and they think that heredity could play a role. However, researchers are still debating whether learning disabilities are, in fact, genetic, or if they show up in families because kids learn and model what their parents do.
Natalie Colcombe's comment, April 3, 2014 8:33 PM
Also Brain development. Some experts think that learning disabilities can be traced to brain development, both before and after birth. For this reason, problems such as low birth weight, lack of oxygen, or premature birth may have something to do with learning disabilities. Young children who receive head injuries may also be at risk of developing learning disabilities.
Natalie Colcombe's comment, April 3, 2014 8:33 PM
Finally Environmental impacts. Infants and young kids are susceptible to environmental toxins (poisons). For example, you may have heard how lead (which can be found in some old homes in the form of lead paint or lead water pipes) is sometimes thought to contribute to learning disabilities. Poor nutrition early in life also may lead to learning disabilities later in life.
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Archived: Guide to the Individualized Education Program

The purpose of this archived guide is to assist educators, parents, and State and local educational agencies in implementing the requirements of Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) regarding Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) for children with disabilities, including preschool-aged children.
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5 Big Facts

5 Big Facts | Special Education- Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
Myth: Cyber schools hurt public education.
Fact #1: In Pennsylvania, cyber charter schools are public schools too! And they are a necessity for families seeking flexibility to meet their child’s individual needs. Whether a student pursues an intense sports schedule, like Hannah, or has unique health challenges, like Alyssa, cyber schools are providing effective learning solutions. Other parents and students choose cyber school to escape from bullying or to customize teaching methods for children with learning disabilities. In just over a decade, cyber schools have experienced phenomenal growth—now serving more than 32,000 kids in Pennsylvania. Providing parents with public school options strengthens public education for everyone.
Myth: Cyber schools drain money from school districts.
Fact #2: Overall, Pennsylvania spending on cyber schools is only $319 million—just 1 percent of the total we spend on public schools every year.


Further, when a student leaves a traditional public school, a portion of the funds already allocated to her education—81 percent on average—‘follows’ the student to the cyber school.The former school keeps the rest of the funds for a student it no longer has to educate.
Myth: Cyber school students don’t get enough socialization.
Fact #3: The flexibility of cyber school programs grants students more time to interact through sports and other extracurricular activities. Many cyber schools also offer "blended learning" centers which provide students in-person class time with teachers and hands-on activities such as mobile science labs and performing arts centers.
Myth: Cyber schools perform poorly compared to school districts.
Fact #4: Cyber schools are held to an even higher standard than school districts for meeting “Adequate Yearly Progress” targets under the federal No Child Left Behind law. While school districts need only meet standards in one age span, such as grades 3-5, 6-8, or 9-12, cyber schools must meet targets in every age group.
Cyber schools also take in many students stuck in failing or violent school districts, who are often well behind in their studies. Were cyber schools not providing quality education—with greater safety and for less money—Pennsylvania families would not continue choosing them over traditional public schools.
Myth: Cyber schools must cost far less to run than traditional public schools
Fact #5: Online, at-home learning sounds less costly than a brick-and-mortar school, but this is not always true. Instructional materials, administrative costs, technology infrastructure and extracurricular activities are equally or more expensive for cyber schools. Cyber schools already effectively educate students for around 20 percent less than their traditional counterparts, and both parents and kids love them. Slashing mythical “excess funding” for cyber schools—as new legislation proposes—will seriously damage their ability to compete and offer Pennsylvania’s concerned families a quality educational alternative.
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Natalie Colcombe's comment, March 13, 2014 8:09 PM
Cyber schools are considered to be public schools. Cyber school may be a better solution for some students compared to regular schooling. Cyber school is flexible, which allows students who participate in extreme activities or have health concerns to still get the benefits of schooling.
Natalie Colcombe's comment, March 13, 2014 8:11 PM
Now, many cyber schools offer blended learning in which most of the class is taught online. However, students may have the opportunity to meet with an instructor or teacher. A common misconception is that cyber schools do not cost as much as a regular school, but this is not necessarily true.
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The Importance of Technology in Education | Daily Edventures

The Importance of Technology in Education | Daily Edventures | Special Education- Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
daily edventures - Anthony Salcito's 365-day look at global heroes in education. Skip to content ... Technology in the field of education can be a powerful tool. ... Find more education infographics on e-Learning Infographics.
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Natalie Colcombe's comment, March 4, 2014 9:40 AM
In the future, technology will become even more and more common in the classroom, for technology implemented in the classroom has many benefits. Learning becomes more engaging and enjoyable for students if they learn with technology. Using technology also improves skills such as "digital learning, collaboration, communication, building teams, listening, planning, mobile learning, problem solving, social, presentations...ect"
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Down Syndrome

Down Syndrome | Special Education- Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
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Natalie Colcombe's comment, April 3, 2014 7:15 PM
Down syndrome is caused by an extra copy of chromosome 21, which is why it is also called 'trisomy 21.' Having three chromosomes means that the effected person has three copies of each of its genes instead of two, which make it hard to control the amount of protiens produced. Producing too little or too much of a protien can have serious consequences.
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Genetic changes involved in learning disability identified - University of Oxford

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Natalie Colcombe's comment, April 3, 2014 8:05 PM
Scientists used to not be certain about the relationship between genetics and learning disabilities. However, they have narrowed down a list of thousands of genes to only a few dozen that effect learning disabilities. 78 genes involved in the nervous system are found to be related to learning disabilities. Identifying the genes could be the first step to offering genetic diagnostic tests to identify learning disabilities.
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What Is an IEP?

What Is an IEP? | Special Education- Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
The Individualized Education Program (IEP) guides the delivery of special education supports and services for the student with a disability.
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Transition: There Are No IEP's in College

Dr. Dell from The College of New Jersey discusses the differences between students' rights under IDEA in high school and ADA in college.


Via Nichelle N. McCall, Eye to Eye
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Archived: Effects of Technology on Classrooms and Students

The perceived effects of reform-based technology use on students and classroom practices are discussed.
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Natalie Colcombe's comment, March 13, 2014 7:16 PM
Teachers who implement technology in the classroom also notice students completing tasks and assignments with a highter calliber. Students are also able to complete more complex tasks. Teachers who implemented technology in the classroom report that students increase motivation as well
Natalie Colcombe's comment, March 13, 2014 7:59 PM
Implementing technology in the classroom also contributes to how students work with others. Teachers report that students who participate in classrooms in which technology have been implemented have also improved their skills with working in small groups. With a limited number of computers or other technologies, students must share with others and work together which increases peer collobaration.
Natalie Colcombe's comment, March 13, 2014 8:05 PM
With technology in the classroom, students also have a greater amount of resources at their fingertips. Even with all the positives of implementing technology in the classroom, however, teachers also saw a potential downside. Students can become easily distracted by the material. Students also have the potential to take advantage of the technology offered to them and use it for something other than the assignment.
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11 Signs That Technology Is A Key Part Of Education - Edudemic

11 Signs That Technology Is A Key Part Of Education - Edudemic | Special Education- Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
The current trend of education technology is nothing to sneeze at. There are iPads and Android devices popping up in classrooms around the world. From BYOD to 1:1 to flipped classrooms, there are a lot of trends that ...
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Natalie Colcombe's comment, March 4, 2014 9:27 AM
Technology has been implemented more and more into the everyday classroom. The "BYOD" policy has also become more common, to go along with this trend. "Adding a visual aid increased retention [by kids in the the classroom] from 14% to 38%"