Special Education- Aspect 1
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InsideEd: The special-education debate --- is mainstreaming good or bad for kids? - Education news and issues in Baltimore that affect students and teachers, from kindergarten to college - baltimor...

InsideEd: The special-education debate --- is mainstreaming good or bad for kids? - Education news and issues in Baltimore that affect students and teachers, from kindergarten to college - baltimor... | Special Education- Aspect 1 | Scoop.it
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Natalie Colcombe's comment, February 20, 2014 11:42 PM
There is still an ongoing debate over wheather mainstreaming is the best option for special education students. Parents and teachers have widely varying views. One parent believed that her child did not learn as well in a regular classroom, and would prefer the student be educated privately. Congress is pushing more toward laws that offer more regulation about the mainstreaming of students.
Natalie Colcombe's comment, February 20, 2014 11:47 PM
"in 2005, more than half of all special education students were considered to be 'mainstreamed. In 1990, only one third of special education students were considered "mainstreamed.' Many parents want their child to be a part of special classes. Some parents reported their child being upset about no one to play with. New Jersey passed the US' first special education laws.
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Special Education Inclusion | Special Education | Resource Pages on Issues | Issues & Advocacy | WEAC | Special Education | Resource Pages on Issues | Issues & Advocacy | Wisconsin Education Associ...

Special Education Inclusion | Special Education | Resource Pages on Issues | Issues & Advocacy | WEAC | Special Education | Resource Pages on Issues | Issues & Advocacy | Wisconsin Education Associ... | Special Education- Aspect 1 | Scoop.it
Special education inclusion information
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Natalie Colcombe's comment, February 19, 2014 9:23 AM
IDEA requires that a student's educational needs be determined by an IEP team. The IEP team must disclose reasons why, or why not the student is integrated into the classroom.
Natalie Colcombe's comment, February 19, 2014 9:31 AM
Past court cases also impact guidelines related to the placement of special education students. However, even after amendments were made to legislation and court cases were settled, there are still 3 questions regarding special education that have yet to have a conclusive answer. "How far must schools go? How important is potential academic achievement/social growth in making placement decisions? What are the rights of the other children?"
Natalie Colcombe's comment, February 21, 2014 12:13 AM
Many are still concerned about inclusion. Does the amount of time a student spends outside of the classroom without 'normal' kids effect them? There are mixed reviews on both sides, from both teachers and parents. Most believe that a student should start out being educated in a regular classroom. If they are having troubles or problems persist, them other options should be explored and the student may be removed from the classroom. However, it is generally believed that students should not start out being seperated from others.
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Step by Step – A Preschool's Inclusion Journey - ChicagoNow (blog)

Step by Step – A Preschool's Inclusion Journey - ChicagoNow (blog) | Special Education- Aspect 1 | Scoop.it
ChicagoNow (blog)
Step by Step – A Preschool's Inclusion Journey
ChicagoNow (blog)
I hired Rhonda Cohen to work as a vastly overqualified Inclusion Aide in one classroom with two children who had special needs.
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Natalie Colcombe's comment, February 21, 2014 12:00 AM
Cherry Preschool started out as a school for students with physical disabilities. However, it has now been transformed into a school that educated students with special needs as well. The preschool recieved an enormous amount of funding and support from parents. It has become extremely successful. The special education program is now a staple of the school.
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Special Education: How to Succeed at Inclusion - San Francisco Chronicle (blog)

Special Education: How to Succeed at Inclusion - San Francisco Chronicle (blog) | Special Education- Aspect 1 | Scoop.it
San Francisco Chronicle (blog)
Special Education: How to Succeed at Inclusion
San Francisco Chronicle (blog)
“My son, who has autism, just started school.

Via Stephanie Plain Potter
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Natalie Colcombe's comment, February 21, 2014 12:02 AM
"Successful inclusion begins and ends with our capacity for valuing others. We cannot include those we do not value. Fortunately, we can learn to value others, even those we see as different or less. Those of us who want to experience this type of inclusion must teach, educate, and inspire. This inclusion education takes place at home, in the community, and in the classroom."
Natalie Colcombe's comment, February 21, 2014 12:08 AM
Successful inclusion also has roots at home. Parents need to be supportive of their child, and their situation. Two groups of people are epecially important for inclusion, teachers and therapists.