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ASK NAO : Shape the path - YouTube

ASK NAO (Autism Solution for Kids) was created by Aldebaran Robotics to customize NAO, a humanoid robot, in order to create a user-friendly robotics solution...
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HmFWNV6uACE&feature=c4-overview-vl&list=PL8871CF815D4854DA

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LEGO Mindstorms 3D Builder: A Quick Look

Printed instructions are so five years ago. A closer look at the free app that accompanies the new LEGO Mindstorms EV3 kit ($350, LEGO Americas).
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Four Little Corners

Winner in Fiction at Bolognaragazzi Award 2013!!! iPad and iPhone download at: https://itunes.apple.com/app/four-little-corners/id598573155 Android download ...
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PictoSon APP's comment, September 22, 2013 5:44 AM
WINNER: Four Little Corners by Dada Company, Spain
This delightful story is about helping a square peg as it tries desperately to fit through a round hole, in order to be with friends. This book-inspired app demonstrates that the translation from print to digital needn’t be sophisticated, as long as a good story is involved. The underlying message — that childhood can be a time when fitting in is difficult — struck a chord with the jurors, who noted “Geometric forms have never been so moving or funny.”
http://bit.ly/VrPSPk (Android)
https://itunes.apple.com/app/four-little-corners/id598573155 (Apple)
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Social story about moving house created using Kid in Story app by LocoMotive Labs

This is a video of a social story about moving house, created using the app Kid in Story Book Maker by LocoMotive Labs. You can read my review of the app her...
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Aplicaciones para hacer cuentos y compartirlos. La mejor manera de consolar y explicar..y compartir lo que nos pasa

 

http://locomotivelabs.com/

 

 

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Toca boca band

Toca boca band
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Toca Boca Band

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SpeechBox™ Speech Therapy App for iOS (iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch)

SpeechBox™ Speech Therapy App for iOS (iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch) | special education App | Scoop.it
for Speech Language Therapy (Apraxia, Autism, Down's Syndrome)
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Sound Matching app

Demonstration of the Sounds Matching app (parent version) from Foundations Developmental House. This app helps develop phonological awareness skills in order...

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Hand Cue Sound Matching app

Demonstration of the Hand Cue Sound Matching app from Foundations Developmental House. This is a supporting app for The Speech-EZ Apraxia Program, which help...

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Speech and Language Disorders

Communication Disorders: Speech and Language Impairments Presented By: Liwanag Dominguez Lois T. Gumataotao ED443: Assistive and Adaptive Technology Dr. J. Cyr

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10 Best Apps for Read Lips | ios | AppCrawlr: Search Engine for Apps

10 Best Apps for Read Lips | ios | AppCrawlr: Search Engine for Apps | special education App | Scoop.it

 

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Read lips, for special needs & language learning. Ability that can be trainned  because enables language acquisition.

 

 

 

 

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Dragon Dictation – Text To Speech App

Dragon Dictation – Text To Speech App | special education App | Scoop.it
Voice recognition lets you easily speak and instantly see your text content for everything from email messages to blog posts on your iPad, iPhone or iPod touch.

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Speech to Text - Dictators



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ASK NAO : Be part of the journey - YouTube

ASK NAO (Autism Solution for Kids) was created by Aldebaran Robotics to customize NAO, our humanoid robot, in order to support teachers with in-class tasks a...
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TUTORIAL 1.1 - IDENTIKAT - Làstrego&Testa and Ovolab

IdentiKat is a funny and creative app for children of all ages, with a high degree of interactivity. Download IdentiKat on the App Store: http://j.mp/YoJzhJ ...
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Build a Car with Kate and Harry

A carefully designed interactive toy app that focuses on child's creativity and experimenting, perfect for the youngest audience around the world. Official s...
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Toca Boca Helicopter app

It's not JUST for kids
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tocaboca helicopter..el helicoptero de boca toca...parece que los abuelos se lo quitan a los nietos

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Theije having fun with the My Playhome App

Deze video is ge�pload vanaf een Android-telefoon.
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http://www.myplayhomeapp.com/

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Speech-EZ HandCues for Apraxia

The Speech-EZ Hand Cues can help a child with motor planning difficulties achieve accurate productions. Watch how a simple symbolic guesture in the form of a...

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APSC app using Speech-EZ Cues

Demonstration of using the Apraxia Picture Sound Cards app and the Speech-EZ Hand Cues. The Hand Cues are a critical piece of The Speech-EZ Apraxia Program a...

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THINKING IN PICTURES: Autism and Visual Thought

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THINKING IN PICTURES about Asperger and Autism & Pictoson help for verbal logic non visual persons and visual thinkers Charles Hart, the author of "Without Reason", a book about his autistic son and brother, sums up his son's thinking in one sentence: "Ted's thought processes aren't logical, they're associational." This explains'~ Ted's statement "I'm not afraid of planes. That's why they fly so high." In his mind, planes fly high because he is not afraid of them; he combines two pieces of information, that planes fly high and that he is not afraid of heights. the mnemonist had a visual image for everything he had heard or read. Luria writes, "For when he heard or read a word, it was at once converted into a visual image corresponding with the object the word signified for him." The great inventor Nikola Tesla was also a visual thinker. When he designed electric turbines for power generation, he built each turbine in his head. He operated it in his imagination and corrected faults. He said it did not matter whether the turbine was tested in his thoughts or in his shop; the results would be the same. Processing Nonvisual Information Autistics have problems learning things that cannot be thought about in pictures. The easiest words for an autistic child to learn are nouns, because they directly relate to pictures. Highly verbal autistic children like I was can sometimes learn how to read with phonics. Written words were too abstract for me to remember, but I could laboriously remember the approximately fifty phonetic sounds and a few rules. Lower-functioning children often learn better by association, with the aid of word labels attached to objects in their environment. Some very impaired autistic children learn more easily if words are spelled out with plastic letters they can feel. Teachers who work with autistic children need to understand associative thought patterns. An autistic child will often use a word in an inappropriate manner. Sometimes these uses have a logical associative meaning and other times they don't. For example, an autistic child might say the word "dog" when he wants to go outside. The word "dog" is associated with going outside. In my own case, I can remember both logical and illogical use of inappropriate words. When I was six, I learned to say "prosecution." I had absolutely no idea what it meant, but it sounded nice when I said it, so I used it as an exclamation every time my kite hit the ground. I must have baffled more than a few people who heard me exclaim "Prosecution!" to my downward-spiraling kite. My thinking pattern always starts with specifics and works toward generalization in an associational and nonsequential way. As if I were attempting to figure out what the picture on a jigsaw puzzle is when only one third of the puzzle is completed, I am able to fill in the missing pieces by scanning my video library. Personal relationships made absolutely no sense to me until I developed visual symbols of doors and windows. It was then that I started to understand concepts such as learning the give-and-take of a relationship. I still wonder what would have happened to me if I had not been able to visualize my way in the world. The really big challenge for me was making the transition from high school to college. People with autism have tremendous difficulty with change. In order to deal with a major change such as leaving high school, I needed a way to rehearse it, acting out each phase in my life by walking through an actual door, window, or gateI had found the symbolic key. When I was in college, I found another door to symbolize getting ready for graduation. It was a small metal trap door that went out onto the flat roof of the dormitory. I had to actually practice going through this door many times. When I finally graduated from Franklin Pierce, I walked through a third, very important door, on the library roof. I no longer use actual physical doors or gates to symbolize each transition in my life. When I reread years of diary entries while writing this book, a clear pattern emerged. Each door or gate enabled me to move on to the next level. Many people are totally baffled by autistic symbols, but to an autistic person they may provide the only tangible reality or understanding of the world. For example, "French toast" may mean happy if the child was happy while eating it. When the child visualizes a piece of French toast, he becomes happy. A visual image or word becomes associated with an experience normal brains tend to ignore the details while people on the autism spectrum tend to focus on the details instead of larger concepts. different types of specialized brains Visual thinkers, like me, think in photographically specific images. There are degrees of specificity of visual thinking. I can test run a machine in my head with full motion. Interviews with nonautistic visual thinkers indicated that they can only visualize still images. These images may range in specificity from images of specific places to more vague conceptual images. Learning algebra was impossible and a foreign language was difficult. Highly specific visual thinkers should skip algebra and study more visual forms of math such as trigonometry or geometry. Children who are visual thinkers will often be good at drawing, other arts, and building things with building toys such as Lego's. Many children who are visual thinkers like maps, flags, and photographs. Visual thinkers are well suited to jobs in drafting, graphic design, training animals, auto mechanics, jewelry making, construction, and factory automation. Music and math thinkers think in patterns. These people often excel at math, chess, and computer programming. Some of these individuals have explained to me that they see patterns and relationships between patterns and numbers instead of photographic images. As children they may play music by ear and be interested in music. Music and math minds often have careers in computer programming, chemistry, statistics, engineering, music, and physics. Written language is not required for pattern thinking. The pre-literate Incas used complex bundles of knotted cords to keep track of taxes, labor, and trading among a thousand people. Verbal logic thinkers think in word details. They often love history, foreign languages, weather statistics, and stock market reports. As children they often have a vast knowledge of sports scores. They are not visual thinkers and they are often poor at drawing. Children with speech delays are more likely to become visual or music and math thinkers. Many of these individuals had no speech delays, and they became word specialists. These individuals have found successful careers in language translation, journalism, accounting, speech therapy, special education, library work, or financial analysis. Since brains on the autistic spectrum are specialized, there needs to be more educational emphasis on building up their strengths instead of just working on their deficits. Tutoring me in algebra was useless because there was nothing for me to visualize. If I have no picture, I have no thought. Unfortunately I never had an opportunity to try trigonometry or geometry. Teachers and parents need to develop the child's talents into skills that can eventually turn into satisfying jobs or hobbies. Concept Formation All individuals on the autism/Asperger spectrum have difficulties with forming concepts. Problems with conceptual thought occur in all of the specialized brain types. Since my CEO's office has poor "computer" connections, I had to use the "graphic designers" in my "advertising department" to form concepts by associating visual details into categories. Scientific research supports my idea. Detailed visual and musical memories reside in the lower primary visual and auditory cortex and more conceptual thinking is in association areas where inputs from different parts of the brain are merged. Categories are the beginning of concept formation. Becoming More Normal More knowledge makes me act more normal. Many people have commented to me that I act much less autistic now than I did ten years ago. My mind works Just like an Internet search engine that has been set to access only images. The more pictures I have stored in the Internet inside my brain the more templates I have of how to act in a new situation. More and more information can be placed in more and more categories. The categories can be placed in trees of master categories with many subcategories. For example, there are jokes that make people laugh and jokes that do not work. There is then a subcategory of jokes that can only be told to close friends. When I was a teenager I was called "tape recorder" because I used scripted lines. To help understand the autistic brain I recommend that teachers and parents should play with an Internet search engine such as Google for images. It will give people who are more verbal thinkers an understanding into how visual associative thinking works The more I learn, the more I realize more and more that how I think and feel is different. My thinking is different from a normal person, but it is also very different from the verbal logic nonvisual person with Asperger's. They create word categories instead of picture categories. The one common denominator of all autistic and Asperger thinking is that details are associated into categories to form a concept. Details are assembled into concepts like putting a jigsaw puzzle together. The picture on the puzzle can be seen when only 20 percent of the puzzle is put together, forming a big picture. http://www.grandin.com/inc/visual.thinking.html Pictoson can help actually: Verbal logic nonvisual persons with Asperger´s WORD CATEGORIES Visual thinkers with Autism PICTURE CATEGORIES
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speech-to-text - Straply

speech-to-text - Straply | special education App | Scoop.it

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Speech to Text Apps. Straply finds 167 Apps. The problem is that as they all tag equally we find agendas and announcers all mixed. I use Speech to text from wassap utility right now. It works quite fine in english, spanish, and french, but I don´t know if It does in other languages as Korean..etc. I did some tests with google translator and Korean did not seem to reproduce same hangul For example..Google speach says 그것은 완벽에 맞는 and Speech to text from Wassap writes 그것은 완전 많네   or this 구글 생산적에 맞는 ..not perfectly the same ?¿?    

 

Would like to know best Multilingual Speech / Voice to text Apps if anyone can help me It would be great

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