Speakeasies & Jazz Age By:JM
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My Video

My Video
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8corxrTaZqg&safety_mode=true&persist_safety_mode=1&safe=active
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Vocabulary

Vocabulary
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1 Timid- showing a lack of courage or confidence; easily frightened.

The mouse was very timid and ran away.

2 Prohibition- the action of forbidding something.

The prohibition of alcohol made a lot of people mad.

3 Enforcement- the act of compelling observance of or compliance with a law, rule, or obligation.

The law enforcement stopped the runaway car.

4 Qualms- an uneasy feeling of doubt, worry, or fear, esp. about one's own conduct.

The person had some qualms about whether or not he would pass the 11th grade.

5 Ratified- sign or give formal consent to (a treaty, contract, or agreement), making it officially valid.

The people ratified the contract agreement since it was not legal yet.

6 Concurrent- existing, happening, or done at the same time.

The concurrent boss will leave for a new job next week.

7 Certified- attest or confirm in a formal statement.

The man was certified in CPR since he is a paramedic.

8 Further- at, to, or by a greater distance.

The house is further on down the road.

9 Constitution- a body of fundamental principles or established precedents according to which a state or other organization is acknowledged to be governed.

The constitution of the United States was ratified.

10 Submission- the action or fact of accepting or yielding to a superior force or to the will or authority of another person.

The submission to the art contest was very pretty.

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Primary Document 2

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California and Western Medicine, 26:808 (1927). See also "Resolution in Regard to Volstead Act", Bull N Y Acad Med. 3(9):598-9 (1927).

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Joseph Mcbride's comment, December 17, 2012 4:16 PM
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Joseph Mcbride's comment, December 17, 2012 4:17 PM
This primary document was written in Western Medicine. It was written back in 1927. It was talking about the Volstead Act. It was talking about if alcohol is illegal. It was illegal for people to drink alcohol back then.
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Current event 2

Current event 2 | Speakeasies & Jazz Age By:JM | Scoop.it
AN illegal bar, complete with a pole dancing stage, operating in the heart of the city is believed to be a clubhouse for the Hells Angels bikie club.
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Topic Website 3

The Jazz Age was a feature of the 1920s (ending with the The Great Depression) when jazz music and dance became popular. This occurred particularly in the United States, but also in the Britain, France and elsewhere. Jazz played a significant part in wider cultural changes during the period, and its influence on pop culture continued long afterwards.

The birth of jazz music is often accredited to African Americans[1], but expanded and over time was modified to become socially acceptable to middle-class white Americans. White performers were used as a vehicle for the popularization of jazz music in America. Even though the jazz movement was taken over by the middle class white population, it facilitated the mesh of African American traditions and ideals with the white middle class society.[2] Cities like New York and Chicago were cultural centers for jazz, and especially for African American artists.

The spread of jazz was encouraged by the introduction of large-scale radio broadcasts in 1922,[3] which meant Americans were able to experience different styles of music without physically visiting a jazz club. The radio provided Americans with a trendy new avenue for exploring the world through broadcasts and concerts from the comfort of their living room.[4] The most popular type of radio show was a "potter palm": amateur concerts and big-band jazz performances broadcasted from cities like New York and Chicago.[5] Jazz artists like Louis Armstrong originally received very little airtime because most stations preferred to play the music of white American jazz singers. In urban areas, African American jazz was played on the radio more often than in the suburbs.[6] Big-band jazz, like that of James Reese Europe and Fletcher Henderson in New York, was also popular on the radio.[7]

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Topic website one

A speakeasy, also called a blind pig or blind tiger, is an establishment that illegally sells alcoholic beverages. Such establishments came into prominence in the United States during the period known as Prohibition (1920–1933, longer in some states). During this time, the sale, manufacture, and transportation (bootlegging) of alcoholic beverages was illegal throughout the United States.

According to an 1889 newspaper, “Unlicensed saloons in Pennsylvania are known as ‘speak-easies.’”[1] They were so called because of the practice of speaking quietly about such a place in public, or when inside it, so as not to alert the police or neighbors.[2]

Speakeasies were numerous and popular during the Prohibition years. Some of them were operated by people who were part of organized crime. Even though police and agents of the Bureau of Prohibition would often raid them and arrest their owners and patrons, they were so profitable that they continued to flourish.

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Two Paragraphs

Two Paragraphs
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            Because the world was changing so much, art was changing too in the 1920’s. First, the music in the 1920’s changed. There was a lot of jazz music that was popular. A lot of music in the cities had pianos too. People could not move their pianos to the country, so the pianos stayed in the city. Secondly, there were a lot of artists in the 1920’s who changed their styles of art. A lot of artists changed their style and more people were making abstract art, like Georgia O’Keefe. People were painting from the wartime and would paint about the war too. Third, the advertising art was going through changes in the late 1920’s. Many people were selling products with catchy labels on them. Fourth, the inventions were a type of art that changed back then. Mr. Ford invented the model T. These cars were art because they had a lot of inventions on them. Lastly, the photos were also art. Many photographers like Man Ray were doing more abstract photos. To conclude, art changed a lot and I am glad it did.

 

           

 

 

 

            Although the world seemed to be changing too much, it was good for art to change too. The music changed because a lot of people were listening to jazz. The people liked to dance more and they would do the “Charleston.” They would also listen to piano music and sing off a whim. Next, the artists were painting more dreary paintings. Also, the advertising was more colorful. People liked the Coke products and to collect those things. There were many posters. Also, inventions were made and the radio was popular. It was a type of art to buy furniture that had electronics on it too. Lastly, photography in the 1920’s was also neater. It was more abstract and people liked to take different types of pictures. To conclude, it was great for the world to change in art during the 1920’s. 

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Primary Document 3

Primary Document 3 | Speakeasies & Jazz Age By:JM | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON, July 24.--The timid housewife who has been making raisin wine and other home brews with one eye on the brewing jar and the other on the front door in fear that a prohibition enforcement officer might appear, need have no further qualms.
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Joseph Mcbride's comment, December 17, 2012 4:14 PM
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Joseph Mcbride's comment, December 17, 2012 4:16 PM
This was a primary document by The New York Times. It was written on July 24, 1920. It was talking about a wife and she wanted to drink.People were not supposed to drink. It said that people were only allowed to drink cider. The people were not allowed to drink alcohol.
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Primary Document 1

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AMENDMENT XVIII

Passed by Congress December 18, 1917. Ratified January 16, 1919. Repealed by amendment 21.

Section 1.
After one year from the ratification of this article the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the United States and all territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for beverage purposes is hereby prohibited.

Section 2.
The Congress and the several States shall have concurrent power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

Section 3.
This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Congress.

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Joseph Mcbride's comment, December 17, 2012 4:12 PM
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Joseph Mcbride's comment, December 17, 2012 4:12 PM
1
Joseph Mcbride's comment, December 17, 2012 4:14 PM
This was the 18th amendment. 2 This was passed by congress. It is written on December 18, 1917. It was ratified on January 16, 1919. It said that people could not sell liquor. It says people could not buy liquor. It said people could not drink the liquor. Liquor was illegal and speakeasies were not supposed to sell it, even if they were in bars.
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Current Event 1

The following is a list of smoking bans in the United States. For smoking bans and restrictions outside the United States, see the worldwide list of smoking bans.

The United States Congress has not attempted to enact any nationwide federal smoking ban. Therefore, smoking bans in the United States are entirely a product of state and local criminal and occupational safety and health laws.

In 1995, California was the first state to enact a statewide smoking ban; throughout the early to mid 2000s, especially between 2004 and 2007, an increasing number of states enacted a statewide smoking ban of some kind. The most recent smoking ban, as of 2012, is North Dakota's statewide smoking ban, which was ratified by voters on November 6, 2012.

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