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Spatial in Schools
Relevant links and resources for teachers using spatial technologies in their classrooms.
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Freedom of the Press

Freedom of the Press | Spatial in Schools | Scoop.it

"Freedom House has been at the forefront in monitoring threats to media independence since 1980. A free press plays a key role in sustaining and monitoring a healthy democracy, as well as in contributing to greater accountability, good government, and economic development. Most importantly, restrictions on media are often an early indicator that governments intend to assault other democratic institutions." 

 

This interactive map shows some intriguing spatial patterns about the freedom of press internationally.  What other patterns to you see in matching up with the most free presses in the world (in green)?  How does a free (or not free press) influence the cultural and political values of a country? 


Via Seth Dixon
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England, Britain and the UK

England, Britain and the UK | Spatial in Schools | Scoop.it

This is the short version of the differences between these interrelated places and terms; the long version is much more complicated than this. 

 

Tags: Europe, political, unit 4 political, states, toponyms.


Via Seth Dixon
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Ally Clark/Mayse Thao's curator insight, February 7, 2014 11:09 AM

This is kinda like the video we watched where that guy who talks fast explained the uk. Oh and this is political

James Hobson's curator insight, October 9, 2014 11:05 PM

(Europe topic 7)

Perhaps this "short" version would've been a better starting point for those less familiar with the terminology. :-) And at least this doesn;t have to be edited to include an independent Scotland, which might've sparked a debate about the terms "U.K." and "Great Britain."

Nonetheless, this serves as a great example of the often-overlooked contrast between physical and political boundaries. Perhaps a simpler example would be "the Americas" (physical) and "the United States of America" (political).

Perhaps one peculiarity which I can relate to this example is that of "Bristol County", a term used seemingly interchangeably between all towns in east-central Rhode Island and nearby Massachusetts. Though currently these are 2 separate counties in 2 different states which just happen to bear the same name, realizing the history behind all of these types of examples can offer further insight into the geographic contexts (physical, political, personal, etc.)

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 1:52 PM

Its no wonder people often get confused when referencing the UK, Britain Isles and Great Britain. I sometimes struggle with the terms and being able to locate where each of the 5 countries fall under. This diagram does a good job at pinpointing where each of the 5 countries on the eastern border of Europe lies.Great Britain consist of Scotland, England, and Wales. The United Kingdom consist of Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland, While Ireland consist of the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. And finally the British Isles consisting of all the countries within. This raises the question, if Northern Ireland is a part of the United Kingdom, is their identity shared also with the Republic of Ireland?