Space Science - SSMS
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NASA plans to launch 3D printer into space in 2014

NASA plans to launch 3D printer into space in 2014 | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it

;lHistorically, astronauts have had to make on-the-fly repairs using what was available on the ship or in the International Space Station.Printer models have become all the rage in recent years. Their ability to create three-dimensional objects—from key chains to octopi to even an Aston Martin DB4—has gotten scientists pushing the printers into new territories, including for printing food. In this case, NASA plans to launch one into space in 2014 to help astronauts print spare parts and tools.“Imagine an astronaut needing to make a life-or-death repair on the International Space Station,” said Aaron Kemmer, the company Made in Space chief executive. “Rather than hoping that the necessary parts and tools are on the station already, what if the parts could be 3D printed when they needed them?” NASA has contracted Made in Space to build the printer, which is estimated to be the size of a microwave.Historically, astronauts have had to make on-the-fly repairs using what was available on the ship or in the International Space Station. One such example was in 1970 when Apollo 13 astronauts had put together a plastic bag, manual cover and gaffer tape to act as a carbon dioxide filter when a piece in the one on the ship failed. A 3D printer could have made a replacement piece and solved the problem.“If you want to be adaptable, you have to be able to design and manufacture on the fly, and that’s where 3D printing in space comes in,” said Dave Korsmeyer, director of engineering at Nasa’s Ames Research Center.This is the first attempt NASA will be making toward having a 3D printer in space, and officials hope the product will help offset costs of future missions and enable quick manufacturing of replacement and much needed tools and pieces for future space missions.3D printers work by feeding polymer materials a design model from a computer through a machine. These polymer materials are generally plastic-like. Lately, however, laser-melted titanium and nickel-chromium powders are becoming available to build stronger components, the kind of components that may be able to withstand the pressures of space. The printer itself will have to be strong enough to withstand lift-off vibrations and be able to perform safely and functionally in an enclosed space station environment.NASA researchers were able to successfully test a metal 3D-printed rocket component last August as part of its goal to reduce production costs. The team is also experimenting with 3D printing small satellites that could be launched from the International Space Station and then transmit data to earth as they orbit around the planet.


Via Annie Theunissen
SSMS Science's insight:

Ok well the fact that we can print things in 3D is cool but when you add being able to print out key chains, and key components of a space station or a rocket is even more amazing. And all the tecknowledge that is required to print out these things can all fit in a box the size of a microwave. And the astronauts during Apolo 13 all they used to repair a broken carbon dioxide filter are a plastic bag, gaffer tape, and a manual cover, but a 3D printer could have just made a replacement part. It is kind of sad that the printer needed to be stronger but there was very little of the componants that ere strong enough to keep the printer from geting compackted so we are trying to get more of the componants to do that.TP      

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Rafael Oliveira's comment, November 13, 2013 7:21 PM
Caramba como a NASA e criativa os caras inventam de tudo mesmo, porém parece bem interessante vamos ver no que vai dar.
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See This Weekend's Eclipse Dash Across the Earth's Face From Space - Wired

See This Weekend's Eclipse Dash Across the Earth's Face From Space
Wired
There it goes: the shadow of the moon zipping across the continent of Africa.
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Astrophysicists Discover Black Hole in Globular Cluster Messier 62 | Astronomy | Sci-News.com

Astrophysicists Discover Black Hole in Globular Cluster Messier 62 | Astronomy | Sci-News.com | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it
A team of researchers reported the first-ever discovery of a black hole (named M62-VLA1) in a globular star cluster in our Milky Way Galaxy.

Via David Simpson
SSMS Science's insight:

A couple of years ago Dr. Tom Maccarone in Texas discovered a black hole in a globular cluster in a nearby galaxy. He found it using X-ray emmision from gases falling into the Black hole. This year in New Mexico they found another black hole. It was in a globular cluster too. This globular cluster Messier 62 is in the constellation Ophiuchus About 35,000 light years away. It measures 110 light years across and has about 1 million times the mass of the sun. This black hole is a so called stellar mass black hole, which means it is a collapse from a massive star. JD

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Milky Way Galaxy may have more than 11 billion Earth-like planets

Milky Way Galaxy may have more than 11 billion Earth-like planets | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it

Our Milky Way galaxy is crowded with far more habitable Earth-like planets than previously thought - at least 11 billion of them in orbit around distant stars, a team of planet hunters led by UC Berkeley astronomers said Monday.

 

Erik Petigura, a Berkeley graduate student, analyzed data from the Kepler spacecraft and calculated that at least 50 billion stars much like Earth's sun are blazing throughout the galaxy.

 

It's possible that even more Earth-like planets exist than Petigura estimates, for his analysis takes into account only one class of hot stars that are known to be very much like our sun. There are other stars called red dwarfs that are about the size of our sun only cooler, and many so-called "exoplanets" may be circling them too, he said.


Via Sepp Hasslberger
SSMS Science's insight:

there are moor earth like planets out there thats incredible I've always dreamed there could be just like you proboble. And the number of them, my goodness, 11 billion habitable planets in our galaxy and they were escoverd (mostly) by one team. Just by analizing data from the Kepler spacecraft, one man Erik Petigura by himself found 50 billion gust by looking at the stars that were like our sun. And there could be moor then how many Petigura esemated. His metheds arrent the most reliable methods, there could be alot moor then he estemates. Even though red dwarfs are cooler they could have earth like planets orbiting them.TP  

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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, November 5, 2013 5:26 AM

Billions of planets out there ... of course there is life and of course there is also intelligent life. All kinds of it. Why aren't we acknowledging those things?

T. Blank's curator insight, November 16, 2013 2:41 PM

Because most intelligent life in the Cosmos is far beyond human comprehension. If UAP reality, with the apparent unknown high technology and energy observed were in the public domain, then our global fossil fueled financial infrastructural would collapse, ending our world as we know it! 

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India blasts off in race to Mars with low-cost space mission - NBC News.com

India blasts off in race to Mars with low-cost space mission - NBC News.com | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it
NEW DELHI — India launched its first rocket to Mars on Tuesday, aiming to reach the Red Planet at a much lower cost than successful...

Via Allen Taylor
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Allen Taylor's curator insight, November 5, 2013 12:13 PM

India's low cost probe lifts off successfully on its way to Mars. At a fraction of the cost of US, European, and Russian Mars missions, India could suddenly become a major player in interplanetary exploration and it space launch services in general.

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Extremely Rare Hybrid Solar Eclipse To Occur On Sunday

Extremely Rare Hybrid Solar Eclipse To Occur On Sunday | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it
redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Parts of eastern North America, northern South America, southern Europe, the Middle East and several other parts of the world will be able to experience a unique type of solar eclipse this...
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With the shuttle done, a co-founder of Microsoft sees an opening in space

With the shuttle done, a co-founder of Microsoft sees an opening in space | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it

Start with the largest aircraft ever built, with a wingspan longer than a football field and a split fuselage fitted with six Boeing 747 jet engines — enough thrust to get 1.3 million pounds off the ground, about 425,000 pounds more than a fully loaded 747. Sling a 120-foot, three-stage rocket below the aircraft, and when the plane reaches 30,000 feet, fire the rocket into space. Then the plane flies back to Earth.

 

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen calls his newest venture Strato­launch, a system designed to lift 13,500-pound payloads — satellites, science experiments, cargo and, eventually, humans — into low-Earth orbit, where the space shuttle used to fly and where the international space station still dwells. Construction of the aircraft is underway in California, with test flights planned for the end of 2016 and the first mission to occur in late 2017 or early 2018.

 

 


Via Stratocumulus, Sheri Fresonke Harper, Thomas Faltin
SSMS Science's insight:

Well if you didn't read the article then you should because this astronomical jet is the largest jet to ever made(of any jet). It has a wing span longer than a football field and 747 engines it tackes 425,000 more thrust then a fully loaded jumbo jet when it is completly empty. It also has a 120 foot long 3 stage rocket underneath it. The jet's main mission is to launch the rocket once it reaches 30,000 feet. Paul Allen calls his newest venture "Stratolaunch", it is desind to lift 13,500 pounds payloads in satelites, experiments, cargo and humans. But it's not going to hapen any time soon.TP            

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Stratocumulus's curator insight, August 1, 2013 9:40 PM

According to the article:

 

"It is always desirable to launch to the east to capi­tal­ize on the direction of the Earth’s spin. The Earth travels about 1,000 mph west to east at the equator; you need to reach a speed of 17,000 mph to get to low-Earth orbit, so there’s no point in penalizing yourself 1,000 mph by heading in the wrong direction."

 

"No, not 'always.'" says Rand Simberg, of TransterrestrialMusings.com. "Only for low-inclination orbits. For very high inclination, or retrograde, it’s actually preferable to launch from a high latitude (ideally, for a retrograde orbit, you’d like to launch from a pole, to eliminate any earth rotation, because it’s rotating in the wrong direction)."

 

http://www.transterrestrial.com/?p=50610&utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

 

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Asteroid Technology: How Astronomers Find Dangerous Near-Earth Space Rocks - Huffington Post

Asteroid Technology: How Astronomers Find Dangerous Near-Earth Space Rocks - Huffington Post | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it
Headlines & Global News
Asteroid Technology: How Astronomers Find Dangerous Near-Earth Space Rocks
Huffington Post
Searching for potentially Earth-destroying asteroids today isn't easy.
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Sun Continues To Produce Solar Flares

Sun Continues To Produce Solar Flares | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it
NASA
After emitting its first significant solar flares since June 2013 earlier in the week, the sun continued to produce mid-level and significant solar flares on Oct. 27 and Oct. 28, 2013.
Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation.
SSMS Science's insight:

After emitting its first significant solar flares since June 2013 earlier in the week, the sun continued to produce mid-level and significant solar flares on Oct. 27 and Oct. 28, 2013.

Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth’s atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however — when intense enough — they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel. I would love to work on this because I love interesting things about the sun.

Another large flare was classified as an M5.1 flare, which peaked at 12: 41 a.m mon Oct. 28. Between Oct. 23, and the morning of Oct 28.    

JD

  
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NASA's moon probe starts outer space Internet test | ComputerWorld.com

NASA's moon probe starts outer space Internet test | ComputerWorld.com | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it

NASA's newly launched lunar probe has begun testing what could eventually become an outer space Internet.

 

NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) observatory said the probe on Thursday night began a limited test of a high-data-rate laser communication system. It's the U.S. space agency's first laser communications test.

 

If it works as planned, NASA plans to use similar systems to speed up future satellite communications and deep space communications with robots and human exploration crews.

 

The spacecraft, which launched on Sept. 6 from the Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Va., reached lunar orbit on Oct. 6. A series of maneuvers put the probe into the proper orbit for engineers on Earth to check out its instruments and set up the laser communications test.

 

The test is expected to run through the middle of November, said Dewayne Washington, a spokesman for NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

 

"They're testing from different vantage points, different weather conditions," Washington said. "We want to gauge how well it would work under different conditions. it'll take a while to do that."

 

"Everything, so far, is going well," he added.

 

The space probe's main mission is to study the moon's atmosphere, though officials say testing the laser communications system also a major undertaking.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
SSMS Science's insight:

This article is interesting because well for one having internet access on the moon and maybe just in space. I also like the name of the probe "Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE).  And hi-data-rate laser comunications it sounds cool but what is it lasers sent from the probe to earth or vice-versa and the lasers have information stored in them and are picked up and sent to a focal point. The tests they did seem pretty exstensive, and apparently all these tests are going to take a while, but I guess if it's necesary then we have to do it.TP

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Astronomers find exoplanet floating through interstellar space | GizMag.com

Astronomers find exoplanet floating through interstellar space | GizMag.com | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it

If you think being stuck in a strange town late at night after the last bus has gone is lonely, then give a thought for the exoplanet PSO J318.5-22. Discovered this year by astronomers at the University of Hawaii, this planet was found floating through interstellar space without a parent star and is one of the smallest free-floating objects seen outside of the Solar System.

 

PSO J318.5-22 isn't that far away, cosmically speaking. At a distance of 80 light years in the constellation of Pictor, it’s six times the size of the planet Jupiter and has a temperature of about 1,160° K (1.630° F, 887° C). From this, astronomers have deduced that it’s a planet rather than a protostar because its too small for fusion to occur.

 

"We have never before seen an object free-floating in space that that looks like this. It has all the characteristics of young planets found around other stars, but it is drifting out there all alone," says team leader Dr. Michael Liu of the Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. "I had often wondered if such solitary objects exist, and now we know they do."

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
SSMS Science's insight:

When I think of a free floating star I think of a small Pluto size planet but of course I'm wrong. It's six times the size of Jupiter and it is about 1160K. It is also listed as protostar instead of a fusion star because it is too small. It is also the first seen(that looks like this), free floating thing in the the history of our planet. It also has the characteristics of a young planet, but it is all alone. Dr. Michael Lui said "I had often wondered if such solitary objects exist, and now we know they do." TP      

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Long-sought pattern of ancient light detected

Long-sought pattern of ancient light detected | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it
The journey of light from the very early universe to modern telescopes is long and winding. The ancient light traveled billions of years to reach us, and along the way, its path was distorted by the pull of matter, leading to a twisted light pattern.

Via Ioannis
SSMS Science's insight:

I disagree with this article because it is  impossible for the light ray to be billions of years old because the world wasn't created yet.( according to the Bible ) Scientists have found proof of this both Christian and Evolutionists. And I realy hate it when people say things like this when they've been proven wrong. And even more so when they say the earth alone is billions or millions of years old when we have scientists and mathmeticians who have looked at the earth's deteriation and have concluded that in billions of years the earth would have been completely gone.TP    

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ESA's Gaia Star-Mapping Mission Set For November Launch

ESA's Gaia Star-Mapping Mission Set For November Launch | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it
[WATCH VIDEO: Gaia Sunshield Deployment Time-Lapse Sequence] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The European Space Agency's (ESA) Gaia mission will be launching from Europe's spaceport in Kourou on November 20 with the goal of...
SSMS Science's insight:

I like this because #1. I think it would be cool to have a map of the stars that is as resent as posible. #2.It would be very helpful to all astronmers arround the world.TP

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Earth-Like Habitable Planets Surprisingly Common, Kepler Space Telescope ... - Huffington Post

Earth-Like Habitable Planets Surprisingly Common, Kepler Space Telescope ... - Huffington Post | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it
Earth-Like Habitable Planets Surprisingly Common, Kepler Space Telescope ...
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Wow! Astronauts Watch Fiery Death of Space Station Cargo Ship (Photos) - Space.com

Wow! Astronauts Watch Fiery Death of Space Station Cargo Ship (Photos) - Space.com | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it
Space.com
Wow! Astronauts Watch Fiery Death of Space Station Cargo Ship (Photos)
Space.com
A robotic spacecraft filled with waste from the International Space Station meets its fiery end in a series of newly released photos.
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You Can See a Sunset From Space

You Can See a Sunset From Space | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it
There are, right now, six people in space.
One of these people is American flight engineer Karen Nyberg.

Via Thomas Faltin
SSMS Science's insight:

There are right now six people in space.

One of these people is american flight engineer Karen Nyberg.

When the sunsets we’re used to seeing the vital cloud-reflected oranges and reds from the land. She did not realize that we could see sunsets like that while sweeping through the sky. This topic would be fun to work on because I would love to see a sunset in space. I like watching sunsets here on earth and I can't imagine what it would be like to see one in space. I wish I could go to space and watch one of those marvelous sunsets. JD

 

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Habitable, Earth-Sized Planets Believed To Orbit One-Fifth Of All Sun-Like Stars

Habitable, Earth-Sized Planets Believed To Orbit One-Fifth Of All Sun-Like Stars | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it
[ Watch the Video: Earth-Size Planets in Habitable Zone ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online New statistical analysis of data obtained by NASA’s now-retired Kepler spacecraft has revealed that one out of every five sun-like stars...
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Scientists Gather To Discuss 833 Potential New Exoplanets

Scientists Gather To Discuss 833 Potential New Exoplanets | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it
Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online
An international group of scientists are gathering for the second Kepler Science Conference this week at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California.
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It's the most Earth-like alien planet yet -- except for the 3,680 degrees - NBC News.com

It's the most Earth-like alien planet yet -- except for the 3,680 degrees - NBC News.com | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it
A puzzling alien planet is the closest thing to an Earth twin in size and composition known beyond our solar system, though it's far too...

Via Allen Taylor
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Allen Taylor's curator insight, October 31, 2013 1:45 PM

Earthlike exoplanet gives new meaning to the term "global warming."

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Spectacular 'Canyon of Fire' Rips Across the Sun in NASA Video - Space.com

Spectacular 'Canyon of Fire' Rips Across the Sun in NASA Video - Space.com | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it
The Space Reporter Spectacular 'Canyon of Fire' Rips Across the Sun in NASA Video Space.com When a 200,000-mile (320,000-kilometer) filament of solar material tore through the sun last month, it cut what looks like a "canyon of fire" in our closest...
SSMS Science's insight:

Researchers at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt Maryland have found a 200,000 long rip in the sun. The Sun is mostly made up of plasma, which is a "soup" of charged particles that takes shape when gas atoms get so hot that their electrons detach. The movement of these charged particles make intense magnetic field. The intense magnetic field make the wispy loops and violent eruptions of the earth's surface. The Solar Dynamics observatory spacecraft which was launched in February 2010 is keeping an eye on the sun's surface. It is equipped to make observations of wavelengths. JD

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Scientists solve mystery of odd patterns of oxygen in solar system's earliest rocks

Scientists solve mystery of odd patterns of oxygen in solar system's earliest rocks | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it
By re-creating conditions in the solar nebula, the swirl of gas that coalesced to form our star, the planets and the remnant rocky debris that circles the Sun as asteroids, the researchers demonstrated that a simple chemical reaction, governed by...

Via Ioannis
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International Space Station visible this week from Silver Spring

International Space Station visible this week from Silver Spring | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it
The International Space Station can be seen in the Metro area skies tonight as its former commander is in town for a book signing.
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Z8-GND-5296: Most Distant Galaxy Yet Discovered | Astronomy | Sci-News.com

Z8-GND-5296: Most Distant Galaxy Yet Discovered | Astronomy | Sci-News.com | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it
Astronomers have discovered what they believe is the most distant galaxy ever found.

Via David Simpson
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I think this article is interesting because well because the most distant galaxy ever found thats awsome.TP

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Astronomers Descibe Brightness of History’s Brightest Star

Astronomers Descibe Brightness of History’s Brightest Star | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it

 A team of astronomers headed by Frank Winkler of Middlebury College has combined precise digital observations with simple mathematics to estimate the apparent brightness of an exploding star whose light reached Earth nearly a thousand years ago, when it produced a display that was probably the brightest stellar event witnessed in recorded human history.

 

On May 1, 1006 A.D., a spectacularly bright star appeared suddenly in the southern sky in the constellation Lupus (the wolf), to the south of Scorpio. Observers in China, Japan, Egypt, Iraq, Italy, and Switzerland recorded observations of the star, which remained visible for several months before becoming lost in the glare of daylight. While all agree that the star was spectacularly bright, it has not been clear until now just how bright.

 

Modern astronomers have long concluded that the 1006 A.D. display resulted from a supernova, a distant star that ended its life in a spectacular explosion. Yet as bright as it appeared in the 11th century, the remains of the supernova are all but invisible today.

 

Through a series of observations with telescopes at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile, Winkler and his team, including Middlebury College undergraduate student Gaurav Gupta (now a graduate student at Cornell University) and Knox Long from the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, found a faint shell of glowing hydrogen surrounding the site where the star exploded. The glowing shell, about the diameter of the full Moon as seen from Earth, is produced by the shock wave from the original explosion as it propagates outward through the extremely tenuous gas of interstellar space.

 

The astronomers used imaging observations spanning a period of 11 years to measure how fast the brightest filaments in the shell are expanding. Other recent spectral observations of these same filaments can be used to determine the absolute value of the shock wave’s speed. This speed turns out to be 2,900 kilometers per second (over 6 million miles an hour), or almost 1 percent of the speed of light.

 

Knowing both the rate at which the distant shell appears to be expanding and the corresponding true velocity, the astronomers used simple geometry to calculate a precise distance from Earth to the shell. The result, 7,100 light-years, must also be the distance to the star that exploded. This means that while the light from the supernova first reached Earth in 1006 A.D., the actual explosion took place 7,100 years earlier.

 

Although there are several different types of supernovae, the one that occurred in 1006 was almost certainly what is known as a “Type Ia,” the same type that several other teams are using to measure the apparently accelerating expansion of the Universe. These are spectacularly luminous events: for a few weeks a Type Ia supernova glows as bright as five billion suns. Furthermore, all Ia’s have virtually the same luminosity—just as all 100-Watt light bulbs produce the same amount of light.

 

The supernovae that astronomers are using to study the distant universe are located in other galaxies at vast distances, and their light is so feeble by the time it reaches Earth that large telescopes are needed just to detect them. But the 1006 supernova was located “right next door,” in relative terms, in a fairly nearby part of the Milky Way galaxy.

 

“By knowing this distance and the standard luminosity of Ia supernovae, we can calculate, in retrospect, just how bright the star must have appeared to 11th century observers,” Winkler explains. “On the magnitude scale used by astronomers, it was about minus 7.5, which puts its brightness a little less than halfway between that of Venus and that of the full Moon. And all that light would have been concentrated in a single star, which must have been twinkling like crazy.”

 

The most explicit historical record of the 1006 star’s brightness comes from the Egyptian physician and astrologer Ali bin Ridwan, who in fact compared the spectacle both with Venus and with the Moon. “It’s taken a long time to interpret what he meant,” Winkler comments, “but now I think we’ve finally got it right.”

 

To visualize how bright the 1006 supernova appeared, find the planet Jupiter, high in the southeast and the brightest object now visible in the evening sky. “If you compare Jupiter with the three stars that make up the belt of Orion, a bit farther west in the sky, the planet is obviously much brighter than any of the belt stars,” Winkler says. “At its peak, the supernova of 1006 would have appeared about as much brighter compared to Jupiter now, as Jupiter is in comparison with the faintest of the stars in Orion’s belt.”

 

“There’s no doubt that it would have been a truly dazzling sight,” Winkler concluded, “In the spring of 1006, people could probably have read manuscripts at midnight by its light.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
SSMS Science's insight:

I think that this is the coolest thing I have ever seen. But it is confusing that a star even, if it is exploded 1000 Ly away is only reaching us now. I think it's interesting that we can calculate things from all the way in 1006 A.D. I can't belive that the hydrogen shell was glowing and that the remains were (when looking from earth)the size of the moon. I like everything about this article espcially how there is no evolution but I do not like how there is no other view point or religious standpoint.TP

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Debut Test Flight Looms for Orion, NASA's Next Manned Spaceship

Debut Test Flight Looms for Orion, NASA's Next Manned Spaceship | Space Science - SSMS | Scoop.it
NASA's Orion capsule is slated to launch from Florida's Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in September 2014. The unpiloted mission features a high-altitude, high-speed plunge into Earth’s atmosphere to assess the craft’s heat shield.

Via Allen Taylor
SSMS Science's insight:

In 2014 NASA is going to be testing a new heat shield. TP

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Allen Taylor's curator insight, October 23, 2013 2:30 PM

NASA's Orion spacecraft is less than a year away from its first test flight. Nobody will be on board, but the heat shield will get a workout as the craft returns at higher than orbital velocity.