Southmoore AP Human Geography
20.2K views | +0 today
Follow
Southmoore AP Human Geography
Resources and current events articles relevant to the study of AP Human Geography.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mr. David Burton
Scoop.it!

25 maps that explain the English language

25 maps that explain the English language | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
From Beowulf to Wikipedia, here's how English grew, spread, and changed.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. David Burton
Scoop.it!

How did English become a Language full of "word twins"?

How did English become a Language full of "word twins"? | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
English is full of words that mysteriously have twins. Here's how it got that way.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. David Burton
Scoop.it!

Why Is English Spelling So Weird?

Why Is English Spelling So Weird? | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
English spelling might seem crazy and unfair, but there are reasons for how it got to be that way.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. David Burton
Scoop.it!

Foucault That Noise: The Terror of Highbrow Mispronunciation

Foucault That Noise: The Terror of Highbrow Mispronunciation | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
From Anaïs to Zizek, a brief list of "shibboleth names"
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. David Burton
Scoop.it!

When Shakespeare committed word crimes | ideas.ted.com

When Shakespeare committed word crimes | ideas.ted.com | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Shakespeare coined new words when he needed -- or merely wanted -- them. Can you guess which words were invented by the Bard?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. David Burton
Scoop.it!

America now has more Spanish speakers than Spain, study claims

America now has more Spanish speakers than Spain, study claims | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Only Mexico has more people speaking Spanish than the U.S., but America could pass their 121 million native speakers before 2050
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. David Burton
Scoop.it!

Why is Canadian English unique?

Why is Canadian English unique? | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
America’s neighbour resisted annexation by the US and its people remained subjects of the British monarch. But Canada’s English isn’t British or American, writes James Harbeck.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. David Burton
Scoop.it!

English is for everybody

English is for everybody | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The language we speak shapes our identity and our society. So let’s celebrate the diversity of English dialects.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mr. David Burton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Are Elvish, Klingon, Dothraki and Na'vi real languages?

View full lesson on TED-ED: What do Game of Thrones' Dothraki, Avatar's Na'vi, Star Trek's Klingon and LOTR's Elvish have in common? They are all fantasy constructed languages, or conlangs. Conlangs have all the delicious complexities of real languages: a high volume of words, grammar rules, and room for messiness and evolution. John McWhorter explains why these invented languages captivate fans long past the rolling credits.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 2014 10:54 AM

This TED ED video lesson brings up some important questions to ponder for cultural geography (and uses some popular fantasy/science fiction examples to do it).   For languages that are spoken by actual populations, they often 'borrow' vocabulary from other languages, making some ask the question, can loan words damage language integrity? 

 

Tags: language, culture.

Rescooped by Mr. David Burton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Do Geography and Altitude Shape the Sounds of a Language?

Do Geography and Altitude Shape the Sounds of a Language? | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Languages that evolve at high elevations are more likely to include a sound that's easier to make when the air is thinner, new research shows

Via Seth Dixon
more...
PatrickHance's comment, September 2, 2013 9:33 PM
Recently, a University of Miami linguist named Caleb Everett made a surprising discovery about how geography influences language. Previously, it was assumed that how languages developed sounds was random. His findings show that languages with ejective consonants have a strong tendency to be in high-altitude regions. Ejective consonants are made by suddenly releasing an intense burst of air, and about 20% of the worlds languages have them. By sampling 567 of the 6909 known languages, Everett found that 87% of languages with ejective consonants are found in areas above 1500 meters. Only 43% of languages originating in high altitude areas were without ejectives, and just 4% of languages developed far from high altitudes had ejectives. Everett also found that as the altitude of a language's origin point grew, so did the chance of it containing ejectives. Assuming that his findings hold up when the rest of the world's languages are analyzed, this would be the first time geography was proven to change the sounds of a language.
PatrickHance's comment, September 2, 2013 9:56 PM
I feel that this is a very important article. If his analysis remains true for all the other remaining languages in the world, then it'll be a major discovery. This research may open up a whole new branch of linguistics, regarding how languages are shaped by geography. Soon, we could be discovering how dry, mountain air could help you make clearer sounds, and so on. From there, we could be studying how factors like socioeconomic status change your speech. The prospects for a big discovery like this are amazing.
PatrickHance's comment, September 2, 2013 10:02 PM
Stromberg, Joseph. "Do Geography and Altitude Shape the Sounds of a Language?." Surprising Science. Smithsonian, 12 Jun 2013. Web. 1 Sep. 2013. <http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/science/2013/06/do-geography-and-altitude-shape-the-sounds-of-a-language/>.
Scooped by Mr. David Burton
Scoop.it!

Breathing Life Into a Dead Language

Breathing Life Into a Dead Language | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Vatican wants to revive Latin for the benefit not only of the church but of the wider secular world. But what are the advantages of knowing a dead language in a global economy that operates in languages such as English and Mandarin?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mr. David Burton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Votes and Vowels: A Changing Accent Shows How Language Parallels Politics

Votes and Vowels: A Changing Accent Shows How Language Parallels Politics | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"It may seem surprising, but in this age where geographic mobility and instant communication have increased our exposure to people outside of our neighborhoods or towns, American regional dialects are pulling further apart from each other, rather than moving closer together. And renowned linguist William Labov thinks there’s a connection between political and linguistic segregation.

 

"Labov suggests that it’s these deep-seated political disagreements that create an invisible borderline barring the encroachment of Northern Cities Vowels. When he looked at the relationship between voting patterns by county over the last three Presidential elections and the degree to which speakers in these counties shifted their vowels, he found a tight correlation between the two. And the states that have participated in the vowel shift have also tended to resist implementing the death penalty.

 

"Social identities are complex, and can be defined along a number of different dimensions like class, race, or ethnicity. Not everyone feels that politics are a part of their core identity. But I suspect that political ideology may become an anchor for accents to the extent that large social groups collectively identify themselves by their political beliefs. According to Bill Bishop, author of The Big Sort, this is happening more and more as Americans voluntarily cluster themselves into homogenous, politically like-minded communities."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. David Burton
Scoop.it!

My year reading a book from every country in the world

My year reading a book from every country in the world | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Ann Morgan considered herself well read -- until she discovered the "massive blindspot" on her bookshelf. Amid a multitude of English and American authors, there were very few books from beyond the English-speaking world. So she set an ambitious goal: to read one book from every country in the world over the course of a year. Now she's urging other Anglophiles to read translated works so that publishers will work harder to bring foreign literary gems back to their shores. Explore interactive maps of her reading journey here: go.ted.com/readtheworld
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. David Burton
Scoop.it!

Singapore terms join Oxford English Dictionary - BBC News

Singapore terms join Oxford English Dictionary - BBC News | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Several Singaporean and Hong Kong English terms, including "wah", "shiok", and "yum cha", are now officially recognised as acceptable English.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. David Burton
Scoop.it!

Dictionary of dead language complete after 90 years - BBC News

Dictionary of dead language complete after 90 years - BBC News | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A full dictionary of the extinct language of ancient Mesopotamia has been completed after 90 years of work.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. David Burton
Scoop.it!

How to Say Everything in a Hundred-Word Language

How to Say Everything in a Hundred-Word Language | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Those who speak Toki Pona say linguistic simplicity can enable a more profound form of communication.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. David Burton
Scoop.it!

Meet Scotland's first Scriever, Hamish MacDonald

Meet Scotland's first Scriever, Hamish MacDonald | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Scottish National Library recently announced its first Scots Scriever — that's "writer" in Scots. Hamish MacDonald will serve as the scriever for the next two years.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. David Burton
Scoop.it!

Esperanto Is Not Dead: Can The Universal Language Make A Comeback?

Esperanto Is Not Dead: Can The Universal Language Make A Comeback? | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A hundred years ago, a Polish physician created a language that anyone could learn easily. The hope was to bring the world closer together. Today Esperanto speakers say it's helpful during travel.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. David Burton
Scoop.it!

Peruvian girl does a Michael Jackson cover in a dying language, and the result is gorgeous

Peruvian girl does a Michael Jackson cover in a dying language, and the result is gorgeous | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Though it’s one of Peru’s two official languages, Quechua is not taught in schools - and is spoken by just around 13 percent of the population.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. David Burton
Scoop.it!

On the 'wild', human imagination and tribal peoples

On the 'wild', human imagination and tribal peoples | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The concept of 'wilderness' has long existed, in Western culture, as a place of pristine natural beauty -- unpolluted by human life: an Eden sanctuary, an antidote to urban living.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. David Burton
Scoop.it!

The Great Language Game

Learn more about the Great Language Game, and how you can contribute to making it better.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mr. David Burton from JWK Geography
Scoop.it!

Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be lingistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.


Via Seth Dixon, Nancy Watson, Josh Kettell
more...
Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Rescooped by Mr. David Burton from JWK Geography
Scoop.it!

Going, Going, Gone: Five of Asia's Most Endangered Languages

Going, Going, Gone: Five of Asia's Most Endangered Languages | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Meet the "hairy Ainu" of Japan, Taiwan's Saaroa, the Kusunda of Nepal, the last Manchus and the Jarawa of India's Andaman Islands.

Via Josh Kettell
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mr. David Burton from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How language transformed humanity

TED Talks Biologist Mark Pagel shares an intriguing theory about why humans evolved our complex system of language.

 

Why is language such a critical component to human cultures and the technologies that we have created?  Why did linguistic diversity exist in great abundance 500 years ago but is now increasingly shrinking?  What is the future geography of languages on Earth going to look like? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 19, 2013 12:27 PM

And if we did choose one language that would be the world standard what would it be?  I would guess that the Western cultures would demand English.  But why should English be the standard?