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Southmoore AP Human Geography
Resources and current events articles relevant to the study of AP Human Geography.
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New Zealand's Wild Haka

ESPN Video: In the USA-New Zealand FIBA matchup, the USA players are very confused by New Zealand's pregame Haka.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 3, 2014 9:03 AM

I've enjoyed the Haka, a ritualized war dance that the New Zealand teams often perform just before a match (and can't we argue that sports a form of ritualized warfare?).  The clash of cultural contexts is  of New Zealand and Team USA is what makes this video work for me. 

MsPerry's curator insight, September 6, 2014 4:37 PM

APHG-U3

Sarah Mahoney's curator insight, October 9, 2014 8:14 PM

Great example of cultural diversity

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On the 'wild', human imagination and tribal peoples

On the 'wild', human imagination and tribal peoples | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The concept of 'wilderness' has long existed, in Western culture, as a place of pristine natural beauty -- unpolluted by human life: an Eden sanctuary, an antidote to urban living.
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French cave home to earliest drawings wins World Heritage status

French cave home to earliest drawings wins World Heritage status | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
UN cultural agency UNESCO on Sunday granted World Heritage status to a prehistoric cave in southern France containing the earliest known figurative drawings. Delegates at UNESCO's World Heritage Committee voted ...
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French bakers battle over what makes a better baguette

French bakers battle over what makes a better baguette | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Despite a treasured place in French cuisine, the traditional baguette is in decline, connoisseurs warn, as both bakers and consumers seek to economize.
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Cultural Perspectives

Cultural Perspectives | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:12 AM

This political cartoon is just another great example of how different cultures are across the globe. Here in America, we are told that the appropriate swimwear to wear to the beach only covers about a third of our body. Where as in the Middle East, wearing a burka is what they are told is the right type of clothing to wear. Whether it be for religious, cultural, or fashionable reasons, women wear all types of clothing and I don't believe it is directly due to male influence. There are many things that could cause this influence such as the church, family, or the media. Yet as the cartoon says, each woman thinks the men in that country are forcing them into wearing clothes like that and their culture is dominated by men. I guess it just shows the different perspectives each culture can have. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:51 AM
This cartoon depicts the cultural differences between two different cultures. On the right you have a woman in a traditional burka that covers all but her eyes. On the left you have a woman in a bikini which is what is apropriate to wear on the beach or to bed. Two totally different societies and beliefs and they both look at one another and see the other person as inapropriate. This is not the first time another country has looked at the USA and turned their nose up to something that we do differently.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 6:31 PM

when I look at this the first thought that comes to mind is it is easy for other people to judge. just by there comments they have no idea what the others beliefs are,. This is a classic judging a book by it's cover. The are both assuming it has to do with a male dominating world. I think it has to do with what you are comfortable with. 

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Market Segmentation

Market Segmentation | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Nielsen Prizm is a tool used by companies to analyze their customers spending habits, lifestyle choices and spatial patterns.  Using their Zip Code Look Up feature, you can search any zip code to g...

 

This is an interesting glimpse into how market research analysts view neighborhoods, geography and spatial analysis.  This economic and cultural data has a wide range of uses (albeit with some serious limitations). 

 

Tags: socioeconomic, neighborhood, place, economic, consumption, spatial, mapping. 


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CIM Academy's curator insight, July 17, 5:13 AM

Segmentation is a key element in strategic planning. This article discusses the importance of market segmentation and provides some key insights. 

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Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be lingistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.


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Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
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NYTimes video: "Skateistan"

NYTimes video: "Skateistan" | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Afghan youth have very limited options for sports and recreation. An Australian man is trying to change that."  Issues of ethnicity, class and gender are right on the surface.  Globalization, cultural values and shifting norms make this a good discussion piece.  


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Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 2014 1:25 PM

This is an inspirational video it is very powerful to see someone trying to make life better. The young Australian man that has created this program should be applauded. Watching this video you can tell that this simple gesture brings so much joy to these children. One feeling that comes to mind is yes countries can seem different but they can also seem familiar. These children are just like any others they want to play and have fun. I think this is a wonderful program for them to help them forget about the dangerous world they live in.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 3, 2014 2:03 PM

This is a good example of the use of soft power in areas where American culture is not popular. Instead of using military force to exert western Ideals on the people of Afghanistan. This Australian may have found a way to close the gap towards bringing our cultures  closer together.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 14, 2014 8:01 PM

In a society that is seen by most of the world as strict and rigid, it was interesting to see these children having fun and breaking the mold of traditional afghan kids. What makes this even more fascinating is that female children are doing some of the skating. With gender issues a hot topic in some Middle Eastern countries, letting kids have fun before being made to conform to tradition is a nice experience for them. While they still respect the culture to they belong to, it is a break from that and a breathe of fresh air for them. These youth are not seen primarily as men and woman, but as children.

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Breathing Life Into a Dead Language

Breathing Life Into a Dead Language | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Vatican wants to revive Latin for the benefit not only of the church but of the wider secular world. But what are the advantages of knowing a dead language in a global economy that operates in languages such as English and Mandarin?
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Mapping American Stereotypes

Mapping American Stereotypes | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

There are plenty of regional biases about other places.  This map was generated by Google autocomplete.  If you Google, "Why is Rhode Island so...." if will automatically suggest some responses.  This was done for all the states and these autoresponses are quite revealing (and often humorous). 


Via Seth Dixon
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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 2, 2012 9:59 PM
I find it funny that from state to state the same adjectives are being used over and over again. For example: "so boring," "so humid," and "so liberal." As much as there are stereotypes for each region, we share the same qualities as a union, for the most part.
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Persian or Iranian? Is there a Difference?

Persian or Iranian?  Is there a Difference? | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Over the next few months, Ajam Media Collective will host a series that focuses on and describes various elements of the cultural, ethnic and linguistic mosaic that we refer to collectively as Iran...

 

What is in a name?  We know that there are subtle differences between Hispanic, Indigenous, Latino and Mexican that are bound with the history of these words and how they have been used by both insiders and outsiders to construct identity.  Likewise, the distinctions between the terms Persian and Iranian are often used interchangeably.  However there are political, ethnic, linguistic and religious connotations that shape the meanings behind these terms.  While I don't necessarily agree with all of the arguments, this is an interesting look at the historical roots of these distinctions and the ramifications of these terms.   


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Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 2014 11:23 AM

This has always been a question between my friends and I, as one of my friends identifies as Persian. In my limited experience in the US it seems that the people who identify themselves as Iranian have immigrated in the last two generations or so. In comparison to families which came over quite a few generations ago who refer to themselves as "Persian"

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 29, 2014 3:58 PM

When speaking about this topic it is important to recognize that Iranian and Persian are not the same. I believe in this classification as well as others placing people into groups of any kind can be dangerous. I enjoyed the comedy routine included in this article by Persian-Iranian-American comic Maz Jobrani. I thought it was very clever how he poked fun at the fact that he prefers to be called Persian at times because in this post 9-11 world it seems "softer". I thought it was hilarious how he mentioned cats and rugs and tried to emphasize the "softer" side of Persia.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 17, 5:00 PM

This is an interesting phenomenon.  I believe we even have a little bit of the "that's not American"-swagger here in the U.S., but thankfully diversity is still celebrated more in our country than anywhere else.  This article points out many of the reasons why there has been and always probably will be much tension within the Middle East.  Like in Iran, most Arabic countries have several different tribes and ethnic groups residing within its borders.  The problem occurs when the countries try to make one culture, one language, or one ethnicity dominant over the others.  

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The Real Boundaries of the Bible Belt

The Real Boundaries of the Bible Belt | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Atlantic CitiesThe Real Boundaries of the Bible BeltThe Atlantic CitiesReligion in America has an unmistakable geographic dimension.

 

We often hear people in the deep South describe there state as the buckle in the Bible Belt.  This map of religiousity in the United States shows a clear Bible Belt with other interesting patterns (with some pertinent political ramifications in an election year). 


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Globalizing the Local, Localizing the Global

Sheikha Al Mayassa, a patron of artists, storytellers and filmmakers in Qatar, talks about how art and culture create a country's identity -- and allow every country to share its unique identity with the wider world.

 

Oftentimes, we in the more developed world seek to change cultural practices and institutions in the developing world. This talk speaks to the importance of locally based agents for cultural change, specifically within the context of the Middle East. While we might wish to see what many perceive as universal rights spread throughout the world, the local cultural geographies must be taken into consideration into how to carry out any initiative that seeks to change local institutions.


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Katharine Norman's curator insight, September 15, 2013 1:19 AM

Sheikha provides an amazing talk that leaves no one denying that culture is the underlying thread that ties us all together.

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The Origins Of The Shiite-Sunni Split

The Origins Of The Shiite-Sunni Split | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The division between Islam's Shiite minority and the Sunni majority is deepening across the Middle East. The split occurred soon after the death of the Prophet Muhammad, nearly 1,400 years ago.
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Iran bans women fans from volleyball matches

Iran bans women fans from volleyball matches | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Female journalists were also barred from mixing with male spectators in World League volleyball match in Tehran.
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What Would It Look Like If A Football Coach Coached Soccer? (Video)

What Would It Look Like If A Football Coach Coached Soccer? (Video) | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Meet Ted Lasso, played by Jason Sudeikis, a Texas born and raised football coach who has come to England to become the coach of Tottenham Hotspur of the Premier League.
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Are Elvish, Klingon, Dothraki and Na'vi real languages?

View full lesson on TED-ED: What do Game of Thrones' Dothraki, Avatar's Na'vi, Star Trek's Klingon and LOTR's Elvish have in common? They are all fantasy constructed languages, or conlangs. Conlangs have all the delicious complexities of real languages: a high volume of words, grammar rules, and room for messiness and evolution. John McWhorter explains why these invented languages captivate fans long past the rolling credits.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 2014 10:54 AM

This TED ED video lesson brings up some important questions to ponder for cultural geography (and uses some popular fantasy/science fiction examples to do it).   For languages that are spoken by actual populations, they often 'borrow' vocabulary from other languages, making some ask the question, can loan words damage language integrity? 

 

Tags: language, culture.

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America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas

America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Provo, Utah, and Burlington, Vermont, represent opposite ends of the U.S. religiosity spectrum.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 7, 2013 11:07 AM

The majority of the most religious metros are concentrated in the South or Utah.  This particular weekend, many of the rythmns of urban life in Utah cities are remarkably visible as the LDS church holds it's semi-annual General Conference.  On the opposite side of spectrum, 5 of the 10 least religious metros are in New England; the west coast is the other center of diminished religiosity (with a mini-center in Colorado). 


Questions to ponder: What cultural patterns help to partially explain the levels of religiosity in the United States?  What other factors explain the patterns of religiosity in your in your local area? 


Tags: USA, culture, religion, Christianity.

Lyn Leech's comment, August 23, 2013 5:45 PM
The fact that as you get more westward (disregarding Utah,) religion looses popularity has to do with the people who, in the past, migrated there. It could be argued that super-religious people back in the old days who came from England to escape religious prosecution tended to get to the east coast and then settle there, whereas people who didn't have a church as a tether would be more likely to go out east to look for gold and things. It's an interesting map, regardless and the west's seeming lack of religion may be due to the fact that most of the population of the US is based on the east, due to extreme conditions in the west such as mountains and deserts.
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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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Religion and Demographics

http://www.ted.com Hans Rosling had a question: Do some religions have a higher birth rate than others -- and how does this affect global population growth? ...

 

What are the connections between religion and demographics?  How does this impact population structure in a particular country?  I found this video from Jeff Martin's fabulous website; Check it out!  http://www.martinsaphug.com/  


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Juliette Norwood's curator insight, January 13, 2014 9:21 AM

This can be viewed in the perspective of a citizen of an LDC. In LDCs, there are religions that cause the woman to be subservient to men. A higher birth rate could be the cause. If these  small religions were to distribute and be adhered to, there could possibly be a spike in the birth rate.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:35 PM

Unit 2

Olivia G Torres's curator insight, November 30, 2014 6:40 PM

This was cool because it showed how religion compared with population. It was cool to me that with most major religions they were having a relatively close number of kids regardless of the income level.

 

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Gangnam Style: The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation

Gangnam Style: The Cultural Geography of a Viral Sensation | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Gangnam Style! sensation is all over the internet, complete with parodies that both honor and mock the original. The following link has the video, parodies and infographics to help student explore the meaning behind the cultural phenomenon.

Questions to Ponder: Considering the concept of cultural diffusion, what do we make of this phenomenon? What cultural combinations are seen in this? How has the technological innovations changed how cultures interact, spread and are replicated?
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Rich's comment, October 3, 2012 2:27 PM
When I first saw this music video and heard the song I remember myself saying "I have no idea what is going on, but the human race is a better place thanks to this guy." I may not know what he is saying but it puts me in a great mood. This guy is breaking cultural and geographical boundaries with music.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2014 6:07 PM

Culture and globalization has spread this song across the United States breaking records and trending on sites such as Twitter. Our exposure to different cultures is great. However, if you do not like songs that get stuck in your head, do not listen to this song . LOL

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The Geography of Charitable Giving

Ever wonder how charitable the people are who live in your area? It turns out that lower-income people tend to donate a much bigger share of their discretionary incomes than wealthier people, according to a new study.

 

Questions to ponder: What are some reasons that Providence RI is the 'least charitable' metropolitan area in the United States according to this data?  Why is the state of Utah ranked as the 'most charitable state?'   Why are the bottom 3 states all in the New England region? 


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Going, Going, Gone: Five of Asia's Most Endangered Languages

Going, Going, Gone: Five of Asia's Most Endangered Languages | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Meet the "hairy Ainu" of Japan, Taiwan's Saaroa, the Kusunda of Nepal, the last Manchus and the Jarawa of India's Andaman Islands.

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UNPO: Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization

UNPO: Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

The Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization (UNPO) is not affiliated with the United Nations (UN). The UNPO seeks to represent nations (as opposed to states) that are not fully autonomous are without a vote in the UN. This group supports all ethnic groups in their pursuit for political self-determination, economic empowerment and environmental resource control.  This is an excellent source for case studies in devolution, ethnic conflicts, indigenous peoples and many issues from both cultural and political geography.


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Religious architecture of Islam

Religious architecture of Islam | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Read Religious architecture of Islam for travel tips, advice, news and articles from all around the world by Lonely Planet...

 

This is an excellent article that can be used in a thematic class for analyzing religion, the human landscape, the urban environment and cultural iconography.  For a regional geography class, this show great images from Indonesia, Spain, Egypt, Syria and Israel/Palestine.  


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andrew desrochers's curator insight, October 28, 2014 2:47 PM

These architectural designs in Israel show religious meanings, what other factors inspire architectural creativity? Who uses these different styles of creativity?

Lily and Cami's curator insight, November 5, 2014 5:18 PM

Israel Religion: I scooped this because the picture really stood out to me because the golden dome stands over the rock on Temple Mount. you also can see great images of Indonesia, Spain, Egypt, Syria, and Israel/Palestine. Not only are these sacred buildings but they are also big religious and tourist attractions.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:20 PM

Although all part of the same religion these buildings are influenced heavily by their location. I think this is important to note because it challenges our assumptions on Islam. When I think of a mosque a certain image pops into my head, these images shows how the same religion can still have local influences.