Geography & Current Events
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Geography & Current Events
Geography resources and current events articles to enhance understanding of the world around us.
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The Economist - How immigrants can save dying cities | Facebook

The Economist - How immigrants can save dying cities | Facebook | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
Declining metropolises in America hope that newcomers can bring about a revival http://econ.st/1CH6XqU #econarchive
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Indian officials want 100 ‘smart cities.’ Residents just want water and power.

Indian officials want 100 ‘smart cities.’ Residents just want water and power. | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
The government plans to spend &u0024;7.5 billion modernizing older cities and building new ones by 2022.
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Caroline McDevitt's curator insight, August 30, 2015 6:53 PM

This article talks about India's plan to create "smart cities" throughout it's country. By doing this, it is helping the country become more urbanized and healthier since right now, most of India's cities run on the dirty water coming from the sewage system, and only clean water comes on for 2 hours each day. By having smart cities becoming a project in India, urbanization will increase and more people will move to cities since water to hospitals, schools, and homes will be purified and clean. As for international relations with this project, the U.S. agrees to help fund for India's project will is helping the relationship we have with them. Also, India's politics and economics will benefit from smart cites as India becomes transformed into a 21st century Utopia, which can now compete with other world powers like the U.S. I believe that smart cities are a good investment for India and it will help speed up their development process greatly.

Tracy Harding's comment, September 1, 2015 3:30 PM
Why do you think the US agree to aid this project?
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Urban Population Issues: Rus in urbe redux

Urban Population Issues: Rus in urbe redux | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
IN LEIPZIGER TOR, people are giving way to grass, flowers and potatoes. So many prefabricated 1950s apartment buildings have been razed in this working-class...
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The Economist - Urbanisation in China | Facebook

The Economist - Urbanisation in China | Facebook | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
By 2030 Chinese cities will be home to about 1 billion people. Getting urban China to work properly is vital to the country’s economic and political...
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Photos: African cities are starting to look eerily like Chinese ones

Photos: African cities are starting to look eerily like Chinese ones | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
It's easy to see China's footprint in Africa.
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Vancouver, Toronto and Calgary all rank in top five on list of world’s most liveable cities

Vancouver, Toronto and Calgary all rank in top five on list of world’s most liveable cities | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it

Three Canadian cities have again cracked the top five on a ranking of the world’s most liveable places. In the latest report from the Economist Int (#Vancouver is #3 on the 2012 Most Livable Cities in the World!

 

In the latest report from the Economist Intelligence Unit, Vancouver ranked third, followed by Toronto and Calgary in fourth and fifth respectively. The Canadian cities were bested only by Vienna in second and Melbourne, which topped The Economist’s Liveability Ranking.

The annual survey of 140 cities uses more than 30 factors to gauge the state of healthcare, education, infrastructure, stability, culture and environment — rendering a score out of 100.

Vancouver lost marks only for petty crime rates, availability of quality housing and congested road networks, with report authors citing a series of infrastructure projects such as the new Evergreen transit line “that will no doubt have a long-term benefit, but in the short-term they can be disruptive.”

 

The results vary little from the last ranking released six months ago, with Vancouver maintaining the third spot after slipping from first place in 2011.

Most of the top-tier countries are separated by fractions of a percentage — the first-ranked Melbourne is scored 97.5, only 1.8 points higher than 10th-place Auckland, N.Z. The Economist Information Unit uses the ranking to provide suggestions on how businesses should compensate employees working abroad in cities “where living conditions are particularly difficult.”

It’s one of several studies of its kind, but economic development experts in the listed Canadian cities say The Economist report’s catering to business communities could lead to tangible benefits...


Via Lauren Moss, Jandira Feijó
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Mehakpreet Kaur's curator insight, March 22, 11:15 PM

This is something I want to read later and share with my inquiry group