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Southmoore AP Human Geography
Resources and current events articles relevant to the study of AP Human Geography.
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Rescooped by Mr. David Burton from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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Declining Fertility Rates

Declining Fertility Rates | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The American birthrate is at a record low. What happens when having it all means not having children?

Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
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Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:36 AM
Children are our legacy, they are our future, and if the birth rate keeps depleting then who will be here to be pur next scientists or doctors? Then again a plus to this situation is how much lower the birth rate is, the more resources we have to equally share (i.e oil, food water etc.)
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:34 AM

In recent research people found that some women are content with not having any children. People might think this way because without a child people are able to do more things like go out or travel. Some may not want children due to expenses. If more people do not want children birth rates could decline over the years.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:23 PM

Not to bulky on information but it gets its point across. why are theyre so many social stigmas around having a kid?  A kid cost a little over a million dollars to raise why should it be looked down apon for choosing not to take the finacial and physical hardship. I personally have been on the fence about the subject because Im not a fan of this world is coming to and i wouldnt want to have someone I dearly care about to have to go through it. But thats neither hear nor there. 

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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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Where America Needs Doctors

Where America Needs Doctors | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

What is the geography of medical practicioners?  Why are doctors concentrated more in certain parts of the country?  "If anything, this map illustrates how much where you live matters for how much health care you have access to. The 17,000 residents of Clark County, Miss. do not have a single primary care doctor in the area. Up in Manhattan there is one doctor for every 500 people."  Click on the link for an interactive ESRI-produced StoryMap. 


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Melissa Marin's comment, April 9, 2012 2:31 PM
It makes me wonder what is preventing doctors from relocating to areas with high need more medical care... If not income, then what is preventing them from benefiting from the high need for supply?
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The Political Geography of Gasoline Prices

The Political Geography of Gasoline Prices | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Rising gas prices make people unhappy, but the pain is felt most acutely in states where it is unlikely to make an electoral difference.

   


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Siobhan Chantigian's curator insight, April 23, 11:39 PM

This is an interesting article about how rising gas prices and how people are going to vote.  

Annie Christofferson's comment, April 27, 6:06 PM
I thought this it was interesting how it said that the states that it really makes a difference in are the ones that don't have as big an impact on the electoral college. It doesn't seem quite fair.
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America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas

America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Provo, Utah, and Burlington, Vermont, represent opposite ends of the U.S. religiosity spectrum.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 7, 2013 11:07 AM

The majority of the most religious metros are concentrated in the South or Utah.  This particular weekend, many of the rythmns of urban life in Utah cities are remarkably visible as the LDS church holds it's semi-annual General Conference.  On the opposite side of spectrum, 5 of the 10 least religious metros are in New England; the west coast is the other center of diminished religiosity (with a mini-center in Colorado). 


Questions to ponder: What cultural patterns help to partially explain the levels of religiosity in the United States?  What other factors explain the patterns of religiosity in your in your local area? 


Tags: USA, culture, religion, Christianity.

Lyn Leech's comment, August 23, 2013 5:45 PM
The fact that as you get more westward (disregarding Utah,) religion looses popularity has to do with the people who, in the past, migrated there. It could be argued that super-religious people back in the old days who came from England to escape religious prosecution tended to get to the east coast and then settle there, whereas people who didn't have a church as a tether would be more likely to go out east to look for gold and things. It's an interesting map, regardless and the west's seeming lack of religion may be due to the fact that most of the population of the US is based on the east, due to extreme conditions in the west such as mountains and deserts.
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One Country’s Table Scraps, Another Country’s Meal

One Country’s Table Scraps, Another Country’s Meal | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Food riots are breaking out abroad but Americans toss a lot of their food in the garbage.

 

What do you consider "garbage" when it comes to food? Take a look at what the average American family wastes each month, and think about where that food could have gone.


Via Dale Fraza, Seth Dixon, Tony Burton
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The Real Boundaries of the Bible Belt

The Real Boundaries of the Bible Belt | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Atlantic CitiesThe Real Boundaries of the Bible BeltThe Atlantic CitiesReligion in America has an unmistakable geographic dimension.

 

We often hear people in the deep South describe there state as the buckle in the Bible Belt.  This map of religiousity in the United States shows a clear Bible Belt with other interesting patterns (with some pertinent political ramifications in an election year). 


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USA National Gas Price Map

USA National Gas Price Map | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

This visualization of gas prices by county in the United States is timely as high gas prices are not only impacting pocketbooks, but are also becoming political taking points for presidential candidates and this issue may drive policy.  This shows the regional variations in prices (so sorry to my California friends), but it is a great launching point for asking the questions: why are the prices for a certain commodity higher in one region than another?  What factors lead to the spatial differences in the relative economic value in one region over another?  Supply and demand works beautifully on a two-axis graph, but supply and demand happen somewhere, giving a simple chart added complexity since it's spatially contingent and we must make the assumption and caveat explicit.  


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Dale Fraza's comment, February 27, 2012 3:22 PM
In an ideal world, gas prices would be $5 a gallon nationwide-with that extra $1.50 going to finding a reasonably priced alternative to oil-run vehicles.
Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, September 29, 4:32 PM

This map is so interested to see! It's interesting to see how the gas prices differ from one region to the other. In the mid-west the gas sees to be awfully lower than the west. Why? Maybe because in the mid-west most families still grow there own crops and don't need to take as many trips to a grocery store than most people in the world. As California, there is obviously a big difference than other states. There also is splash of red in New York, which then we could all say both California and New York are the most popular; with there cities and fame, it is clear why then maybe the gas prices are higher there.