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Southmoore AP Human Geography
Resources and current events articles relevant to the study of AP Human Geography.
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Rescooped by Mr. David Burton from Geography Education
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Dhaka, Bangladesh = World Traffic Capital. 650 intersections, only 60 traffic lights

Dhaka, Bangladesh = World Traffic Capital. 650 intersections, only 60 traffic lights | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 6:46 PM

The fact that traffic accounts for $3.8 billion in costs is a simply a staggering figure.  I can't stand being in traffic for 5 minutes never mind multiple hours every day just to get a mile or two down the street.  With population so high in these megacities, its astonishing to see that the governments of these cities are not focusing more on the infrastructure to stabilize the traffic.  Im sure this in turn effects the economy and the lives of all individuals involved.

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 4:05 PM

Anyone who has driven through Boston or New York City has shouted inordinate amounts of profanity and expletives at traffic and traffic lights, or wished that they would just get rid of them. In Dhaka, there are over 600 intersections without traffic lights, and with it comes delays, pollution, and in all likelihood, astronomical blood pressure levels. The lack of traffic signals is not the true culprit here, but dense population in the area and, according to locals, rickshaws. Rickshaws move too slowly and block buses and cars from moving. The obvious solution is to build car-only lanes and widen roads, but that cost time and money they country is not willing to invest. In the mean time, Bangladesh is stuck with toxic fumes and road rage. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 7, 8:52 AM

Driving during rush hour in places like Boston, New York, or Los Angeles can be enough to make any American driver impatient and anxious. Multiply that congestion, anger, impatience, and frustration by ten and you'll have some idea of what the traffic situation is like in Dhaka, Bangladesh. As one of the world's megacities, Dhaka has an enormous population that grows more and more every year. Like in every major city, there are millions of people who must get to work, school, the market, and home everyday. Dhaka, however, lacks not only the physical infrastructure to support these commuters, but the political and economic infrastructure as well. Attempts by the government to fix the traffic problem would inevitably alienate everyone from rickshaw drivers to car owners to bus companies to policemen. All of these entities are important components in the everyday commute for citizens of Dhaka. 

 

While this article deals with the traffic problem in Dhaka and Dhaka alone, to think that it is only a problem there would be a grave misjudgment. In a world that is growing faster than it ever has before, new megacities are cropping up all the time. In many cases, these cities can be found in developing countries that are becoming the new centers of industry and trade. As a result, the physical, political, and economic infrastructure to support these enormous population booms just does not exist. Problems that these enormous daily traffic jams produce concern huge losses of money and sharp decreases in quality of life. Poverty and an increase in the number of slums is also a concern, as many workers are forced to live wherever they can so they can walk to work everyday. The traffic problem in Dhaka, therefore, is representative of the problems facing many emerging megacities. Many local and national governments are unable to implement solutions that would have significant impacts on the issues that face their cities. So though Dhaka's traffic problem may seem unique, its causes and potential solutions should be watched closely by other emerging megacities around the world. 

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Breaking Caste: Dalit Girls Chance at a Better Life

Breaking Caste: Dalit Girls Chance at a Better Life | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Inside an extraordinary school that gives India's Dalit girls a chance at a better life...

 

Cultural change, especially traditions that are deeply engrained over many generations, are difficult to reverse.  In India, the caste system is changing but not without tremendous efforts by individuals and institutions that are deeply committed to equality and expanding opportunities for the most socially vulnerable population.  There are a variety of videos and articles here that show how one school is making a difference in the lives of 'untouchable' girls to give them a hope for the future. 


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World's Biggest Power Blackout in Human History Hits India

The second day of India's power grid failures were worse than the first. Nearly 1900 miles of India went dark, an area that is home to nearly half of India's...

 

How is this issue geographic?  What themes are present in this issue and how are they interrelated? 


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