Geography & Current Events
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Geography & Current Events
Geography resources and current events articles to enhance understanding of the world around us.
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If you're going to talk about Africa,... - Al Jazeera English | Facebook

Africa is home to 1.1 billion people in 54 nations, speaking 2,000 languages. So why does it get generalised as all doom and gloom when 1 in 3 Africans...
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Photos: African cities are starting to look eerily like Chinese ones

Photos: African cities are starting to look eerily like Chinese ones | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
It's easy to see China's footprint in Africa.
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Africa’s Population Surge

Africa’s Population Surge | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
At current growth rates, sub-Saharan Africa, which now makes up 12 percent of the world’s population, will account for more than a third by 2100.

 

Africa is the world's fastest growing region and consequently it is an incredibly young (demographically speaking) region.  This video show key reasons (primarily cultural and economic) for the population growth within Africa.  How does the  demographic transition model apply to Africa?


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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:46 PM

With declining rates of infant mortality, stable and growing maternity rates, the population of Africa is being projected to account for 33% of the world’s population. This may hold true unless we see what is happening in Europe, where increased maternal education and help with child rearing for society is leading to smaller families. So much so, that they have whole towns dying from lack of population replacement. China is seeing this as well with their “one child” program.  Unless sub-Saharan Africa starts a program heavy on education, the area will far exceed it’s ability to house and feed it’s populace.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:31 AM

Within the other regions discussed in class, I can start to see how much of a global issue overpopulation is to the world. Alone, sub-Saharan Africa accounts for 12% of the global population and could possible go up to 1/3 by 2100. This is in incredibly huge number despite the time giving for it to occur. African suffers some similar problems as India. The areas are so overpopulated it becomes unsafe due to sanitation, water, food, and amongst all poverty. The big problem as well is that the generations are rather young. Nigeria is Africans most populous area. The poverty in this area where the power goes off in the middle of a birth and flashlights are being used in order to help the mother give birth. This is very important to analyze that not the proper equipment is giving for these people living in this region. The positive is that more people are being aware of pre contraceptives and seeking more family planning. 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:56 PM

as we have seen in several articles before this is a large problem all over the world. mass population growth that the government can not keep up with will become a huge problem and lead to much more poverty. this needs to be handled carefully by individual governments and hopfully they can find a way to control this problem.

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China's aid to Africa: No strings, more problems - Humanosphere

China's aid to Africa: No strings, more problems - Humanosphere | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
Marking its increased interest in Africa, China made a huge splash by pledging $60 billion for development projects and investments over the next three yea
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Africa for Norway -- a video & website to help build perspective

Africa for Norway -- a video & website to help build perspective | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it

This website is an incredibly humorous parody of Eurocentric charitable organizations that, while well-intentioned, propogate many negative stereotypes about Africa. 

    

Questions to Ponder: What do you think the 'point' of Radi-Aid is?  Do you agree with their point?  How does the media influence our idea of places?   

 

Tags: Africa, development, NGOs, Norway.


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 11:48 PM

This video is a satire regarding the aid sent to Africa, in this case it is aid from Africa sent to Norway. This was created as many within Africa feel the aid given is the wrong things or simply old unwanted garbage. If America and Europe wish to actually send effective aid to Africa its important to diagnose the problems and then send them goods that can actually address the problem.  

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 11:01 AM

This comedic video of Africa sending Radiator's to Norway, a country that experiences cold weather every year, demonstrates how (we as westerners especially) tend to overwhelm the continent with things they have an overwhelming collection of. Africa is sometimes seen as a continent in need, but people who are sending "aid" to the continent often neglect to understand that they continent have made great stride to be able to compete in the global economy. Now that the roles have been reversed, its funny to see African's taking initiative to help Norway combat there winter weather.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:12 PM
After seeing this video, I can do nothing but laugh. "Raid - Aid" I see the point that the African people are thinking, it is cold in Norway and Africa can be a hot country, so the idea of sending the unused radiators to Norway to warm them up is funny. In reality, Norway is a very advanced country technologically, actually, as a matter of fact, it is also one of the most stable countries too. For Africa to send radiators to Norway, it is useless and they would probably just end up scrapping the metal from the radiators.
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Global Healthcare Patterns

Global Healthcare Patterns | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
The Guardian's health editor introduces our health factfile - and the full dataset behind it...

 

Discussion questions: What regional patterns are there in the per capita healthcare spending?  What connection would you expect between per capita health care spending and the quantity of doctors?  What areas spend the least on healthcare?  How come? 


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