Geography & Current Events
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Geography & Current Events
Geography resources and current events articles to enhance understanding of the world around us.
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When Living on a Boat Beats Paying Urban Rent

When Living on a Boat Beats Paying Urban Rent | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
Some Britons are turning away from expensive flats and taking up residence on urban waterways.
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Would you take a dip 35 metres up in London's first 'sky pool'?

Would you take a dip 35 metres up in London's first 'sky pool'? | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
The Embassy Gardens ‘sky pool’ will join two 10-storey buildings in new Battersea development
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Urban Population Issues: Rus in urbe redux

Urban Population Issues: Rus in urbe redux | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
IN LEIPZIGER TOR, people are giving way to grass, flowers and potatoes. So many prefabricated 1950s apartment buildings have been razed in this working-class...
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Saudi Arabia to build world's tallest tower, reaching 1 kilometer into the sky

Saudi Arabia to build world's tallest tower, reaching 1 kilometer into the sky | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia is building the world's tallest tower. Once done, it will be 558 feet taller than the Burj Khalifa.
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Ignacio Garrido's curator insight, April 22, 2014 12:33 PM

Exercise 25. You have to send your answer by Moodle. Good Luck¡¡

 

1. What is the tallest building nowadays? Where  is it?

2. Where will the  tallest building be built ?

3. What do you think is in these countries where these buildings are built?

4. Can you imagine how the live will be in the 200 floor? Explain it.

5. Think in the tallest building of your town and describe it ( Where, how, made of, painted like...)

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This Is The Next Generation Of Global Cities

This Is The Next Generation Of Global Cities | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
Cities in lower-income countries are rapidly catching up with the world's top business capitals, according to a new report.

Chicago-based consulting firm A.T. Kearney is predicting the next generation of global cities, based on the speed with whi...
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Dhaka - Part 2 of 5 - The dreams of Dhaka's garment girls - YouTube

Global Post Documentary
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Transportation and Planning

"When you combine a street and a road, you get a STROAD, one of the most dangerous and unproductive human environments. To get more for our transportation dollar, America needs an active policy of converting STROADs to productive streets or high capacity roadways."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 8, 2014 2:52 PM

In this video, a road provides high connectivity between places, and a street is a diverse platform of social interactions that create a place.  A 'stroad' can be likened unto a spork--it tries to do it everything but does nothing especially well.  While you may debate the principle being shown, this video (found on Atlantic Cities) is a good way to show the spatial thinking that city planners need to utilize to improve the urban environment. 


Tagstransportation, urban, planning.

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 5:03 AM

the danger of stroads

François Lanthier's curator insight, January 31, 2014 2:19 PM

The Stroad - an unfortunate phenomenon... NYC is taking action to minimize its' STROADS... more cities should do the same.

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15 foods you can regrow from scraps

15 foods you can regrow from scraps | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
The interest in urban gardening and organic foods has grown as a reaction against a mechanized, commercialization agricultural industry with genetically-modified produce.  Modern consumers are seek...

Via Seth Dixon, Dennis V Thomas
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Mary Burke's comment, April 14, 2013 5:56 PM
I love this idea. And I every one of these foods. When I'm done with school in two years I'm going to have a garden and get my grandchildren involved. They need to know where food comes from. My dream would be to grow my own food.
Meg Conheeny's comment, April 26, 2013 7:37 PM
This is really cool. In this day and age so many consumers are trying to find ways to stay away from the “genetically-modified produce." Many people want to grow gardens and eat more organic and natural products. This article shows ways to grow products from scraps of food such as growing carrots from carrot tops or tomatoes from seeds. This concept is really interesting I had no idea this could be done. I think this idea will catch on and could ultimately make people healthier.
Dave Cottrell's comment, April 27, 2013 4:01 PM
This works very well. I don't just throw out tomatoes that spoil in the house or even on the vine late in the season. If you throw them into a heap in the fall with other garden scraps, they will produce very hardy plants that you can transplant in the spring. When you buy a (non GMO) pumpkin in the fall, save the seeds. Clean them well by washing them, dry them on an old towel, and plant them in cardboard egg cartons in some compost in the spring. These are just a few of the things you can grow from so-called waste!
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In Bike-Friendly Copenhagen, Highways For Cyclists - via @APHumanGeog

In Bike-Friendly Copenhagen, Highways For Cyclists - via @APHumanGeog | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
Bikers are everywhere in Copenhagen. And now the city is building new, high-speed routes into the city that will make it easier to commute, even from the distant suburbs.

 

The transportation urban planning paradigm in Copenhagen is not exclusively structured around automobiles and the logistics needed for drivers.  Copenhagen has heavily invested in cycling and they are reaping the rewards based on there efforst.  As the Earth-Operators Manual Facebook Page stated, cyclists in Copenhagen daily travel 750,000 miles; enough to go to the moon and back. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Jeff F's comment, September 4, 2012 12:11 PM
Scandinavia once again shows itself to be leading the way in social and environmental policy.

The bike highways are a great idea. They can help stop traffic congestion, keep people healthy, and reduce an individual's carbon footprint.

I used to work about a mile from my house and other than the winter, or when it was raining, I'd bike to work each day. Not only was it better for myself and the environment, I also didn't have to waste gas money.
Seth Dixon's comment, September 4, 2012 9:16 PM
I agree Jeff. I'd ride my bike to work, the the infrastructure isn't designed for it and I'd be jeopardizing my own safety. If you build it, they will ride.
Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 2015 9:27 PM

This is a cool phenomenon.  It will help public health and people will save tons of money.  The more I read about the Scandinavian countries the more i wonder if it might not be the best kept secret in the world.

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The High Line

The High Line | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
The official Web site of the High Line and Friends of the High Line...

 

What do you do with an outdated elevated train line running through a crowded neighborhood in New York City?  In the 1980s, residents called for the demolition of the line as the eyesore since it was blamed for economic struggles of the community and increased criminal activity.  Unfortunately demolition is extremely expensive.  However, this one particular abandoned line has recently been converted into an elevated green space that has economically revitalized the local real estate.  Find out more about this innovated park and project.


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Where America Needs Doctors

Where America Needs Doctors | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it

What is the geography of medical practicioners?  Why are doctors concentrated more in certain parts of the country?  "If anything, this map illustrates how much where you live matters for how much health care you have access to. The 17,000 residents of Clark County, Miss. do not have a single primary care doctor in the area. Up in Manhattan there is one doctor for every 500 people."  Click on the link for an interactive ESRI-produced StoryMap. 


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Melissa Marin's comment, April 9, 2012 2:31 PM
It makes me wonder what is preventing doctors from relocating to areas with high need more medical care... If not income, then what is preventing them from benefiting from the high need for supply?
Max Minard's curator insight, March 21, 2015 8:17 PM

The map shown above portrays the need of medical offices in each county of America. As you can see, areas on the eastern side have very little need for more doctor's offices while many areas in the Midwest and central parts of America have very little or even lack any offices at all. According to the report, the map seems to illustrate the importance of one's county based on the amount of health care provided. Also, when looking at the basic pattern on the map, how come the low amounts of health care offices are mainly located in these certain areas? What prevents it from being even all around. All along the central areas from Texas to North Dakota, there is an excessive amount of counties with no access to doctor's office at all. This surprised me and made me think why the pattern is so evident. Are these certain areas have an economic disadvantage compared to others? I personally believe that the federal government needs to attend to this counties in need. I suppose that they are in fact dealing with economic issues and that they can't afford health care offices. I may be wrong but based off the location of these areas, my inference leads me to think this and more medical attention needs to be brought to the Midwest in hopes of developing better health care in these such areas. 

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 2015 6:54 PM

Summary:  This map analyzes two things,  how many Americans need a doctor in general per county, and how many Americans need a very specialized doctor per county.

 

Insight:  This map demonstrates what we learned in Unit 2 because it is a collection of geographic data presented spatially for geographic analysis.

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Indian officials want 100 ‘smart cities.’ Residents just want water and power.

Indian officials want 100 ‘smart cities.’ Residents just want water and power. | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
The government plans to spend &u0024;7.5 billion modernizing older cities and building new ones by 2022.
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Caroline McDevitt's curator insight, August 30, 2015 6:53 PM

This article talks about India's plan to create "smart cities" throughout it's country. By doing this, it is helping the country become more urbanized and healthier since right now, most of India's cities run on the dirty water coming from the sewage system, and only clean water comes on for 2 hours each day. By having smart cities becoming a project in India, urbanization will increase and more people will move to cities since water to hospitals, schools, and homes will be purified and clean. As for international relations with this project, the U.S. agrees to help fund for India's project will is helping the relationship we have with them. Also, India's politics and economics will benefit from smart cites as India becomes transformed into a 21st century Utopia, which can now compete with other world powers like the U.S. I believe that smart cities are a good investment for India and it will help speed up their development process greatly.

Tracy Harding's comment, September 1, 2015 3:30 PM
Why do you think the US agree to aid this project?
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Photos: African cities are starting to look eerily like Chinese ones

Photos: African cities are starting to look eerily like Chinese ones | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
It's easy to see China's footprint in Africa.
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Paris Is Trying to Fix One of the Worst Urban Planning Decisions It Ever Made

Paris Is Trying to Fix One of the Worst Urban Planning Decisions It Ever Made | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
The city is erecting a grandiose glass canopy over one of its most contested sites as part of a new culture and shopping complex.
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Dhaka, Bangladesh = World Traffic Capital. 650 intersections, only 60 traffic lights

Dhaka, Bangladesh = World Traffic Capital. 650 intersections, only 60 traffic lights | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

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Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:50 AM

Its amazing how much traffic can affect air pollution, especially in such a small place. Dhaka is heavily populated, traffic in this small but heavily populated community is very stressful, even to look at in the photo provided above. I can't imagine living in such a heavily populated area. I guess you can compare it to downtown New York City. However the pollution is more intense in Dhaka than it is in NYC.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:35 PM

This is a prime example of a megacity and the population that it cohabits the city. The huge populaiton that is se densley populated in such a small area creates for a large traffic and pedestrian issues. After watching the video you would think that there would be more accidents but living in a city like this you would get use to the population ways and learn the ways of life.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:28 AM

Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh, suffers from overpopulation. As funny and nerve-wrecking this video was, it shows an instability on how important technology is in order for safety. In the video we can see cars just passing by fast and furociuosly within centimeters of crashing in the car in front of it. There is no one guiding traffic and nonetheless, any stop and traffic lights on the streets. It is a free for all in the middle of the capital when it comes to driving and this is a lack of safety for the people in Bangladesh. It is almost impossible for people to cross the road without a high risk of getting driven over. We can also see how there are so many cars in the are was well. The region is very overpopulated and to think how worse it would be if everyone in the area owned a car. 

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Suburbs Try to Prevent an Exodus as Young Adults Move to Cities and Stay

Suburbs Try to Prevent an Exodus as Young Adults Move to Cities and Stay | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
A report found that counties like Westchester, Nassau and Suffolk faced tough competition from New York City for young people, perhaps because of less diversity and a dearth of modest rentals.
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Campbell Ingraham's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:59 PM

This article talks about how young adults are lingering in the city nowadays, and many do not move back into the suburbs like they used to. This trend has confused demographers, and they have formulated differing theories as to why this is happening. The typical thing that people would do is live in the suburbs, move to the city, find a spouse, make a family, then move back into the suburbs. Now this trend is declining rapidly.

 

This article relates to push and pull factors, and migration in relation to employment and quality of life. Demographers are having trouble determining the cause of this strange change in location. They wonder what the reasoning is for young adults to stay in the city for a long time rather than move back to the suburbs. What pull factors keep them in the city? What push factors keep them away from the suburbs?


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Dhaka - Part 5 of 5 - Who can solve a problem like Dhaka - YouTube

Global Post Documentary
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Dhaka - Part 3 of 5 - Disasters drive mass migration to Dhaka - YouTube

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Dhaka - Part 1 of 5 - The fastest growing megacity in the world - YouTube

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Can You Name These Cities by Their Starbucks Locations?

Can You Name These Cities by Their Starbucks Locations? | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it

"Can you recognize it by its Starbucks locations?  Let’s find out. This quiz shows all of the Starbucks locations within the city boundaries of 20 domestic or foreign cities, and for each you must name the city depicted from four choices."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 24, 2013 1:19 PM

This is my favorite place-based guessing game since GeoGuessr (5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where).  This isn't about knowing Starbucks locations, but understanding spatial urban economic patterns (just as this article showing the locations where McDonald's and Burger King will place stores also relies of understanding urban economic patterns).  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few.  This is one way to make the urban model more relevant.       


Tags: urbanmodels, economic, trivia.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 6:53 PM

Unfortuntaley I wasn't very good at this game. I believe I ended up getting 5 answers correct. However what was intersting about this article was to see how each starbucks was placed in certain areas. There were so much more starbucks locations in city areas. The starbucks' also typically were off of main highways or corners. This is for similiar reasons to what we dicussed about dunkin donuts in class. People are only going to travel so far for coffee. If it is not convienent then people will go else where. It is not like car dealership where people will drive out of their way to look. For a coffee people on average may drive 5 minutes. Anything too out of the way people will avoid. That is why there are so many starbucks and dunkins so close to eachother. They are set up equdistant from each other in locations that are convient for people around the area to try and get them to choose their coffee. It is typical to put a coffee shop on the main roads like we see in the maps, as well as in numerous locations to convience the whole area. The more convient the shop the more money they will make. That is why there are some many locations so close to each other. It is interesting to see it visually on a map just how many locations there actually are. 

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Which cities are the most electric car-friendly?

Which cities are the most electric car-friendly? | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
San Francisco, predictably, is near the top of the list of cities with the most electric car-charging stations. But it couldn't beat out winner Portland, Ore. and a surprising chart-topper from Texas.
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Abu Dhabi starts operations at new $9b port

Abu Dhabi starts operations at new $9b port | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
ABU DHABI (AFP) - Oil-rich Abu Dhabi began commercial operations on Saturday at its new Khalifa Port in a multi-billion-dollar project to transfer its main container terminal from the 40-year-old port of Mina Zayed.
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Downtowns: How Did We Get Here?

Kennedy Smith is considered one of the nation's leading experts on downtowns, downtown economics, independent business development and the economic impact of urban sprawl, with a long career in downtown revitalization.

 

This video discusses the decline of the American Central Business District, the rise of shopping malls, the importance of the automobile and spatial organization of particular economic sectors.

 

Parts Two  http://vimeo.com/37041011 ; and Three  http://vimeo.com/37050944 ; continue the discussion with an emphasis on practical urban planning policies for small cities to revitalize the downtown region with some domestic and foreign examples. 


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:38 AM

I have wondered about that where these downtowns came from. I have thought of it because I am very curious to learn about downtown providence and how it became a downtown. Where did the word downtown come from? It is amazing how things are being called in this world.