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Resources and current events articles relevant to the study of AP Human Geography.
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Oklahoma driver license may be another obstacle when boarding flights

Oklahoma driver license may be another obstacle when boarding flights | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A big change in federal law could mean your Oklahoma driver's license will no longer get you on board your flight. Oklahoma says it doesn't plan to comply with the federal "REAL ID" law that adds security features to Oklahoma driver's licenses.
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In addition to the Human Geography issues embedded into this discussion, the video with this story features an interview with Southmoore's own Ladonna Tarr. Congratulations to Mrs. Tarr for be available and willing to do the interview.

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Mumbai makes it to 'smart city' list on strength of its airport - The Times of India

Mumbai makes it to 'smart city' list on strength of its airport - The Times of India | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A single big idea — its monumental new airport — has propelled Mumbai into the A-list of National Geographic’s "smart cities" across the world.
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Transportation and Planning

"When you combine a street and a road, you get a STROAD, one of the most dangerous and unproductive human environments. To get more for our transportation dollar, America needs an active policy of converting STROADs to productive streets or high capacity roadways."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 8, 2014 2:52 PM

In this video, a road provides high connectivity between places, and a street is a diverse platform of social interactions that create a place.  A 'stroad' can be likened unto a spork--it tries to do it everything but does nothing especially well.  While you may debate the principle being shown, this video (found on Atlantic Cities) is a good way to show the spatial thinking that city planners need to utilize to improve the urban environment. 


Tagstransportation, urban, planning.

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 5:03 AM

the danger of stroads

François Lanthier's curator insight, January 31, 2014 2:19 PM

The Stroad - an unfortunate phenomenon... NYC is taking action to minimize its' STROADS... more cities should do the same.

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In Bike-Friendly Copenhagen, Highways For Cyclists - via @APHumanGeog

In Bike-Friendly Copenhagen, Highways For Cyclists - via @APHumanGeog | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Bikers are everywhere in Copenhagen. And now the city is building new, high-speed routes into the city that will make it easier to commute, even from the distant suburbs.

 

The transportation urban planning paradigm in Copenhagen is not exclusively structured around automobiles and the logistics needed for drivers.  Copenhagen has heavily invested in cycling and they are reaping the rewards based on there efforst.  As the Earth-Operators Manual Facebook Page stated, cyclists in Copenhagen daily travel 750,000 miles; enough to go to the moon and back. 


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Jeff F's comment, September 4, 2012 12:11 PM
Scandinavia once again shows itself to be leading the way in social and environmental policy.

The bike highways are a great idea. They can help stop traffic congestion, keep people healthy, and reduce an individual's carbon footprint.

I used to work about a mile from my house and other than the winter, or when it was raining, I'd bike to work each day. Not only was it better for myself and the environment, I also didn't have to waste gas money.
Seth Dixon's comment, September 4, 2012 9:16 PM
I agree Jeff. I'd ride my bike to work, the the infrastructure isn't designed for it and I'd be jeopardizing my own safety. If you build it, they will ride.
Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 9:27 PM

This is a cool phenomenon.  It will help public health and people will save tons of money.  The more I read about the Scandinavian countries the more i wonder if it might not be the best kept secret in the world.

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Fifty Years Ago and Today, Japan Blazes Trails With Trains

Fifty Years Ago and Today, Japan Blazes Trails With Trains | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
In 1964, the Japanese jumped far ahead of the U.S. with what became known as bullet trains. Fifty years later, they’re still far ahead. (RT @UpshotNYT: Has it really been 50 years since Japan got its bullet train?
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Dhaka, Bangladesh = World Traffic Capital. 650 intersections, only 60 traffic lights

Dhaka, Bangladesh = World Traffic Capital. 650 intersections, only 60 traffic lights | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 6:46 PM

The fact that traffic accounts for $3.8 billion in costs is a simply a staggering figure.  I can't stand being in traffic for 5 minutes never mind multiple hours every day just to get a mile or two down the street.  With population so high in these megacities, its astonishing to see that the governments of these cities are not focusing more on the infrastructure to stabilize the traffic.  Im sure this in turn effects the economy and the lives of all individuals involved.

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 4:05 PM

Anyone who has driven through Boston or New York City has shouted inordinate amounts of profanity and expletives at traffic and traffic lights, or wished that they would just get rid of them. In Dhaka, there are over 600 intersections without traffic lights, and with it comes delays, pollution, and in all likelihood, astronomical blood pressure levels. The lack of traffic signals is not the true culprit here, but dense population in the area and, according to locals, rickshaws. Rickshaws move too slowly and block buses and cars from moving. The obvious solution is to build car-only lanes and widen roads, but that cost time and money they country is not willing to invest. In the mean time, Bangladesh is stuck with toxic fumes and road rage. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 7, 8:52 AM

Driving during rush hour in places like Boston, New York, or Los Angeles can be enough to make any American driver impatient and anxious. Multiply that congestion, anger, impatience, and frustration by ten and you'll have some idea of what the traffic situation is like in Dhaka, Bangladesh. As one of the world's megacities, Dhaka has an enormous population that grows more and more every year. Like in every major city, there are millions of people who must get to work, school, the market, and home everyday. Dhaka, however, lacks not only the physical infrastructure to support these commuters, but the political and economic infrastructure as well. Attempts by the government to fix the traffic problem would inevitably alienate everyone from rickshaw drivers to car owners to bus companies to policemen. All of these entities are important components in the everyday commute for citizens of Dhaka. 

 

While this article deals with the traffic problem in Dhaka and Dhaka alone, to think that it is only a problem there would be a grave misjudgment. In a world that is growing faster than it ever has before, new megacities are cropping up all the time. In many cases, these cities can be found in developing countries that are becoming the new centers of industry and trade. As a result, the physical, political, and economic infrastructure to support these enormous population booms just does not exist. Problems that these enormous daily traffic jams produce concern huge losses of money and sharp decreases in quality of life. Poverty and an increase in the number of slums is also a concern, as many workers are forced to live wherever they can so they can walk to work everyday. The traffic problem in Dhaka, therefore, is representative of the problems facing many emerging megacities. Many local and national governments are unable to implement solutions that would have significant impacts on the issues that face their cities. So though Dhaka's traffic problem may seem unique, its causes and potential solutions should be watched closely by other emerging megacities around the world. 

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The World's 25 Busiest Airports

The World's 25 Busiest Airports | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
More than 1.4 billion airline passengers departed, landed, or connected through these massive facilities in 2012. Viewing them from above gives a sense of their gargantuan scale and global significance.

Via Seth Dixon
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I've been through 13 of these airports (over half).

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L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 2014 4:24 AM

Transport technology is a key factor that assists the operation of Global networks

 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:11 PM

I found it interesting that one of the most busiest airports was in the US, in Atlanta to be exact. A lot of the airports that are included in this list of 25 were located in the US. Also, I noticed that there are no busy airports in Africa, South America, and Australia. I'm wondering if it is because not many people wish to travel there due to the climate and environment.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:26 PM

Is really good to know the busiest Airports because you would think that the number one is John F. Kennedy International Airport but it is not. The number one busiest airport in the world is the

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

 

 
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The High Line

The High Line | Southmoore AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The official Web site of the High Line and Friends of the High Line...

 

What do you do with an outdated elevated train line running through a crowded neighborhood in New York City?  In the 1980s, residents called for the demolition of the line as the eyesore since it was blamed for economic struggles of the community and increased criminal activity.  Unfortunately demolition is extremely expensive.  However, this one particular abandoned line has recently been converted into an elevated green space that has economically revitalized the local real estate.  Find out more about this innovated park and project.


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