Geography & Current Events
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Geography & Current Events
Geography resources and current events articles to enhance understanding of the world around us.
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Geographically Yours

Geographically Yours | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it

"If an urban population demands the freshest vegetables, they should be produced within a 24-hour field-to-table delivery zone.  What, therefore, should be the highest and best use of agricultural land between Taiwan's two largest cities, Taipei and Kaoshiung, only 200 miles apart?  The Lord of the Rings, a.k.a., Johan Heinrich Von Thünen, has the answer."  [2011]


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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 6, 2013 2:13 AM

This image communicates the importance of agriculture and marketplace relativity. in an area where transportation is minimal and people happen to be more more poorer then need to supply needed resources in a timely manner is very important. Farmers and resource providers need to be close enough geographically. This image shows an outside clothing and food market were people get to shop around and choose in a convientent ways there most needed items. The umbrella suggests rain as the child and other shoppers are being covered. This outdoor market doesnt necessarily suggest poverty but a wide range of population given a convenient location to buy goods quikcly and efficiently. The market may be located in a urban downtown area or also a village central area. Regardless the location, and goods provided shows the valuable commodities need to be provided in a manner, freshest possible for delivery.

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, November 13, 2013 8:40 AM

It is said that locally grown food can have more nutritional value than organic if the latter comes from thousands of miles away. If you had to choose, which would you rather have, locally grown or organic? 

Megan Becker's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:30 PM

Summery: This article shares the importance and relevance of the Von Thunen model, even in modern agriculture. It also touches on urban population demands and how it effects the size of the Von Thunen model, bring the last level much closer to the city center. 

 

Insight: I think that with urban demands of fresh foods, it is absolutely correct to have to shift the Von Thunen model. Of course, in its time the model was correct, but with the growing agribusiness, it's no longer 100% accurate. 

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Currency Map

Currency Map | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it

We've seen a world map made of each country's coins before. Here's another currency map that uses images of each country's bills...And of course I'm going to enjoy this. 


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82 iconic world landmarks to visit

82 iconic world landmarks to visit | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it
Some buildings and features are so well known they have become icons of place.

 

This is a great collection of important world landmarks including the pictured Potala Palace in the Tibetan city of Lhasa.  Who wouldn't like to see some of these places?   

 

Tags: geo-inspiration, tourism, images.


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Sophia Schroeder's comment, September 1, 2013 8:02 PM
All of these landmarks are beautiful. It's very interesting to see how much culture, especially religion, has shaped these "must see places." Also, I felt like I was traveling through time and got to examine the feats of new architectural eras, though some would debate that architectural works from the past are more outstanding strictly by the means in which they built these masterpieces. It needs to be said (to add to the wonderment of these places) that most of these monuments are built in places where the overall economic status is low; to see things like temples and churches of such great magnitude and beauty built with such craftsmanship, dedication, and money (even though it is scarce) shows how much they rely on their faith. I was also disappointed to see that the two monuments displayed for America, the Lincoln Memorial and the St. Louis Arch, were, in my opinion, not the best picks. Compared to the other landmarks ours feel so mundane, so void of history and culture (maybe, that's because I have grown up seeing them all my life and their meaning and awe has deteriorated to me.) I guess this can be attributed, in part, to the fact that our country is newer and has not yet grown enough to have the rich history including the trials and tribulations in which other countries have had which makes their culture more fascinating and intriguing to me.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:49 AM
Sophia, Thanks for your very fine comment! I agree with you entirely, and especially about the Lincoln Memorial and St Louis Arch. Better choices might be the Grand Canyon, the Giant Sequoia trees in California, the National Cathedral in DC, or even Mt Rushmore? And some of the ancient cliff dwellings in the Southwest are amazing. Too bad they did not consult us.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:51 AM
PS ... or the Hoover Dam?
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11 of the Most Colorful Cities in the World

11 of the Most Colorful Cities in the World | Geography & Current Events | Scoop.it

What are the cultural aesthetics of architecture within any particular cultural group?  What do these landscapes say about the people and society that created them?  Do you think there would be economic benefits for Guanajuato's (Mexico) urban layout?  Why is Willemstad more iconically Dutch than most places in the Netherlands? 


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 15, 2014 10:46 PM

This article tells us the eleven most colorful cities in the world. Although they give us eleven options, everyone knows that the first one is going to be the best one. Number one, the picture that is shown above, is located in Guanajuato City, Mexico. As you can tell from the photo, all of the buildings are different colors. The city was founded in 1554 next to one of the richest mining areas of Mexico. In the 16th century, there was a mining boom, thus led them to the construction of this colorful, beautiful city. Alleyways are spread out in every direction surround by a breathtaking mountain view. This was the only spot that Mexico took on the top eleven scale. The Netherlands took the number two spot along with the number eight spot. First with Willemstad and second with Utrecht. India was another country that took two spots on our countdown. The last two spots were claimed by Jaipur and Jodhpur. Places that were on here that I was surprised about included places like Italy and Sweden. The pictures do not do it justice. The places looked magnificent and I only hope and hope to see them up close and personal one day.