Southern China Exports
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From Here to Weird: 7 Bizarre Stuff you can find in China

From Here to Weird: 7 Bizarre Stuff you can find in China | Southern China Exports | Scoop.it
If it’s a nation that includes billions of people, speaks the most widely spoken language on Earth, eats almost anything that contains a pulse, is widely stereotyped as the ones who always get straight A’s, and known as the manufacturers of the world’s cheapest merchandise, then it is a nation that’s not limited to the mainstream. China, besides its neighbor Japan, has the word “exotic” used and abused in all senses of the word. Here are some of those one-of-a-kind objects:
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China's most bizarre stuff that would surely amazed you !

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China Exports and Air Pollution: Can the Earth Be Remade in China?

China Exports and Air Pollution: Can the Earth Be Remade in China? | Southern China Exports | Scoop.it

What comes into your mind when you see a label that says “Made in China?” We all know the stereotype: cheaply made and low-quality. But China has been shredding that image off for years now – in 2009, a 30-second commercial shown on CNN featured a “Made in China, Made with the World” theme, which depicted products with the “Made in China” label being made with the aid of top foreign brands. The ad included a refrigerator labeled with “Made China with European styling,” clothes labeled with “Made in China with French designers,” and the like.

This branding campaign was a move to boost China’s product image, and indeed, according to the 2014 “Made In” report, a study conducted by Interpublic Group’s global brand consultancy Future Brand, The People’s Republic of China ranked ninth on the list of products consumers would most likely purchase. The research concluded that the country of origin of goods is “more important to consumers than its price, availability, or style.” China ranked tenth in Fashion, fifth in Electronic Goods, and ninth in Automotive, implying that people are now more appreciative of goods that are made in China, quality-wise. That’s good news for China and its export trade, which is now recovering from a year of stagnancy. According to the numbers, if the data is reliable, exports from China has increased by more than 10% in January, 2014, compared to the past year.  Yet progress always comes with a price, if we were to take heed of Enrico Fermi’s Fermi Paradox, which states that “it is the nature of intelligent life to destroy itself.”

In January, 2014, a report from National Geographic showed that while China has always been one of the countries in the world that has the worst air pollution, the leading source and cause of this environmental hazard is the manufacturing of goods to be exported to the United States and other foreign countries.  Burning of coal, for instance, has shortened China’s life expectancy 5.5 years shorter than in the 1990s. Emissions from China’s manufacturing industries have now reached the Pacific Ocean and have contributed to the smog in the United States. Because of the demand of China’s exports to the United States, one-fifth to one-third of China’s air pollutants originate from the production of these export materials. Sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxide are among the air pollutants produced by China’s manufacturing industry, and today, China now tops the list of countries that contribute to greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere. The domino effect does not stop there; China’s air pollution is blamed for the increasing intensity of cyclones in the northwest Pacific.

Who is to blame for this rise of air pollution in China? Should we blame the consumers of these exports, or China itself for its factories? The debate about who’s to take the blame could go on, but regardless of answer, the more important thing is to figure out a plan and a solution to this environmental issue, and to act on it as soon as possible. After all, our planet can’t be remade in a factory.

Vera Mansoor's insight:

Progress always comes with price, That's what makes China suffer nowadays.

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