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Hayfield schools adopt social media rules - Post-Bulletin

Hayfield schools adopt social media rules - Post-Bulletin | Education | Scoop.it
TheNewsTribune.com Hayfield schools adopt social media rules Post-Bulletin The new social media guidelines adopted by Hayfield, a district of 735 students, are thought to be a relatively new response by a Minnesota school district to the expanding,...

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Book bannings on the rise in U.S. schools, says anti-censorship group

Book bannings on the rise in U.S. schools, says anti-censorship group | Education | Scoop.it

The Kids’ Right to Read Project investigated 49 book bannings or removals from school shelves in 29 states this year An anti-censorship group in America has reported a flurry of attempted book bannings in the last quarter of the year and has said...


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Bumpy Start for Teacher Evaluation Program in New York Schools

Bumpy Start for Teacher Evaluation Program in New York Schools | Education | Scoop.it
Principals and teachers expressed frustrations with the new system, which some say creates more work and tests and has a temperamental computer program.
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New Survey Highlights Autistic Children Face a High Level of Bullying in Hertfordshire Schools

New Survey Highlights Autistic Children Face a High Level of Bullying in Hertfordshire Schools | Education | Scoop.it
The Hertfordshire branch of the National Autistic Society (HARC) Hertfordshire, UK – survey carried out in the local area asked parents their opinions about school provision for their autistic children.

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Public schools beat private schools | Ideas | The Boston Globe

Public schools beat private schools | Ideas | The Boston Globe | Education | Scoop.it

Like many in their field, Christopher and Sarah Lubienski, education professors at the University of Illinois, had long taken it as a given that private schools generally outperform public schools.

 

Why would parents shell out thousands of dollars a year in tuition if they weren’t getting more for their money?

 

Moreover, studies in the 1980s and ’90s had apparently settled the matter, showing that private schools produced higher test scores even when accounting for the demographic differences between public and private.

 

But more recently, when she was working on a study of math instruction, Sarah Lubienski came across a result she didn’t expect. When she divided the schools she was looking at into public and private categories and controlled for demographics, the schools stacked up quite differently. Public schools seemed to be producing better test scores than private. They were also doing better than charter schools.

 

“That,” says her husband and colleague Christopher Lubienski, “is when we started investigating this more intensively.”

 

They decided to take a new, in-depth look at nationwide standardized test data. Using results from the math portion of the National Assessment of Educational Progress, or NAEP, the Lubienskis compared scores from more than 13,000 public, private and charter schools. The private schools did have higher raw scores. But once they controlled for factors like family income, race, and location, they found that public schools were overall getting better results from their students.

 

The Lubienskis locate the reason in a surprising place: private-school autonomy. School reform advocates have long argued that more autonomy would allow public schools to innovate, and that letting families choose where to send their kids would force schools to improve their game. But the Lubienskis argue that independence and competition may actually be holding back achievement at private and charter schools.

 

In a new book, “The Public School Advantage: Why Public Schools Outperform Private Schools,” they outline their findings and walk through the implications. The result may lead education reform advocates to rethink their policies—and parents to question one of their most important decisions.

 

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