South America
1 view | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Terra Ore from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | South America | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 28, 2015 5:50 PM

This is a fine example of people looking out for one another.  It might be easier to industrialize their food market but it's more admirable to preserve tradition, help small indigenous business, and try your best at making the country more healthy.  I applaud them for doing this.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:33 PM

I think I might want to move to Bolivia one day! Reciprocity is often a term used for corporate culture; you but from me and I'll buy from you type of relationship. This is still true in Bolivia only they do it on a much more personal level. Farmers share equipment, they share crops, seeds and develop a rapport not easily undone by corporations such as McDonald's. Bolivia's multiple micro-climates allow it to grow a wide variety of foods for their citizens, thus making it easier to trade within their circle of neighborhood farmers. "I'll trade you ten pounds of potatoes for five pounds of Quinoa."

The article goes on to state that Bolivians do indeed love their hamburgers, a handful of Subway's and Burger King's still do business there, but the heritage of picking a burger from a street vendor has been passed down by generations. These cholitas, as they are called, sell their fare in the streets of Bolivia and this type of transaction is not easily duplicated by large corporations. I have added Bolivia to my bucket list...

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 30, 2015 10:28 PM

" Whats Bolivia doing so right that McDonalds couldn't make it there?"

Food is not a commericial space here.

Morales, speaking to the United Nations General Assembly in February, slammed U.S. fast-food chains, calling them a “great harm to humanity” and accusing them of trying to control food production globally.

“They impose their customs and their foods,” he said. “They seek profit and to merely standardize food, produced on a massive scale, according to the same formula and with ingredients which cause cancers and other diseases.”

Even still, with one of the lightest carbon footprints in the world, cherished food practices and progressive food sovereignty laws on the books, Bolivia could still be a model to the rest of the world—the United States especially—for a healthier, more community-based food system.

 

What an insightful read. I never thought of considering our food a s a "commercial space" but that is essentially exactly what it is. Our food has been extremely commercialized. Products our pushed through advertisement continuously. Most of the foods in America are not even real food but food products, factory made. This is absolutely a role model country for how food should be consumed.

Rescooped by Terra Ore from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Top Ten Places to Visit in South America

The Top Ten Places to Visit in South America | South America | Scoop.it
South America is a land of natural exotic beauty that will leave you speechless, a land of mystery and great historic importance. If you make a trip to the southern hemisphere, be sure to include these precious gems.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:40 PM

I can't wait to travel the world!

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, February 14, 2015 7:45 PM

South America is the best place to go and visit. Geographical stature is beyond amazing. I hopefully will go there one day for a honeymoon or something and avoid this horrid northern weather.  I have some friends from ecuador and she tells me that some areas in south america whether it be brazil, peru or any other location and there are areas that would leave you with your mouth open. Alot of beautiful landscapes, and alot of endangered species

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 19, 2015 9:17 PM

I love to travel and I'm a huge fan of mountains.  Tierra del Fuego here I come. 

Rescooped by Terra Ore from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Favela Images

Favela Images | South America | Scoop.it

I love these favela images by Fernando Alan.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 6:48 AM

These images of the favelas are both breathtaking and heartbreaking. Breathtaking in the sense that these aerial images show the scale of the entire neighborhood. You begin to get an appreciation for how large these favelas actually are. The amount of people living in this area is remarkable. The image is also extremely heartbreaking. I can only imagine the everyday problems and issue that the residents of these slums face. In the nations so called festive city, I see little reason for these people to celebrate. These are the forgotten people of the brazilin economic boom. They are the ones who the government would not like anyone to know about. Sadness and aw some up my reaction to this photo.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 11:57 AM
Just seeing images like this make me feel sad that there are people out there living the way they do. Favelas can be defined as the "slums" or ghettos. Favelas are built on hillsides and they tend to have very poor history with the police. Since the favelas are considered to be the slum area, the government provides very little assistance, and if you were to visit the favelas, you could find for example some very poor and dangerous wiring from the local people wire-tapping.
Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:42 PM

This is an incredible favela village in South America. It shows how densely the population of slums are and how they are built up on the hillside. Most favelas are built on the side if the hills which are the most unstable portions because they can't afford to have a better place in the valley and away from the mudslide and avalanche areas. Great depiction of the slums.

Rescooped by Terra Ore from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Photographing Iconic Landmarks

Photographing Iconic Landmarks | South America | Scoop.it
Oh, Machu Picchu, ancient city of the Incas, pride of Peru, must-see travel destination: You've never been so appropriately photobombed by a llama.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:59 PM

While humorous these pictures really show that certain areas and regions are often imagined by a set and specific image. When Machu Picchu is thought of it is always seen from the same peak, making this an incredibly popular photo spot for tourists, or in this case a llama.  

Michael Eiseman's curator insight, December 18, 2014 7:19 PM

#LlamaHam we at www.viptourgroup.com have about 20 pictures of Llamas that are pretty photogenic. I have one that was stuck in a split tree on purpose in Salta Argentina.  Seems they have personality! and want to get a few bucks now for a photo. #paytoplay hipsters.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 2015 1:21 PM

This is hilarious. It's a perfect moment to capture a picture, while also distracting from how actually beautiful Machu Picchu really is. But, if anything this will probably make people want to visit even more, because they'll all want to take this picture themselves. Which, will undoubtedly be good for Peru's economy. Who says photobombs can't be a good thing?