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Why Music Helps You Memorize Items

Why Music Helps You Memorize Items | Sounds of Change | Scoop.it
If grade school has taught us anything, it's that turning a list of items into a song is a great way to remember things. That same basic process works just as well in adulthood, and The Wall Street Journal explains why.

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Ukraine: Music Really Can Change the World

Ukraine: Music Really Can Change the World | Sounds of Change | Scoop.it
This brave pianist took on a wall of police — armed only with some Chopin.
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Musicians Have A Biological Advantage When It Comes To Emotions In Sounds

Musicians Have A Biological Advantage When It Comes To Emotions In Sounds | Sounds of Change | Scoop.it
In a study in the latest issue of European Journal of Neuroscience, an interdisciplinary Northwestern research team says they have found biological evidence that musical training enhances an individual's ability to recognize emotion in sound. The ...

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Andrew McCluskey's curator insight, November 13, 2013 1:50 PM

Deep in the whole music and language relationship again but here' a study from 2009 that showed that musical training enhanced a person's ability to identify emotion in sound.  Which when you think about it - has lots of advantages (bullshit detector anyone?)

This is another Nina Kraus directed study from Northwestern and involved lots of brain stem analysis through scalp electrodes (cool!) If musicians brains get to the emotional aspect of sound faster and more economically it is posited that musical training might be a great tool to help aspergers and autistic people - would make sense.

 

Image Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/umdnews/5985718936/

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Does music training change the brain?

Does music training change the brain? | Sounds of Change | Scoop.it

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Andrew McCluskey's curator insight, November 6, 2013 5:16 PM

This is a summary of a literature review which would make this a curation of a curation of a curation, nice!  Neuroplasticity is the big thing here - the brain's ability to route new connections and re-route old ones.  Neuroplasticity is a good thing if you want to learn something new like a language or a skill; the thinking is the more you do it - the easier it is.  So - does musical training change the brain - yep - the evidence would indicate that it clearly does - the big questions though are how and why and there's a hell of a lot of variables involved.

 

Image credit: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3766835/figure/F1/

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Music as a Language: Victor Wooten at TEDxGabriolaIsland

Victor Wooten is an innovator, composer, arranger, producer, vocalist, and multiinstrumentalist. He has been called the greatest bass player in the world. He is a skilled naturalist and teacher, a published author, a magician, husband and father of four, and a five-time Grammy award winner.

In Music as a Language Wooten makes the case for learning music in the same way as we learned our first language, calling for a more natural, less academic approach. He makes the point that, as babies, we weren't taught our first language or corrected when we made a mistake. We didn't even know we were beginners and got to 'jam' with people much better than us. Wooten draws on his own musical education as an example of how taking this approach can deliver great results.

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Flea about Music

Flea from the Red Hot Chili Peppers tells the story of how he discovered music and the challenge under privileged kids have in learning and having access to the Arts. The Silverlake Conservatory of Music currently has 700 students, 200 of which are on a full scholarship, learning music for free. 

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Why Music Makes Our Brain Sing

Why Music Makes Our Brain Sing | Sounds of Change | Scoop.it
When a song triggers both anticipation and reward, it moves us like nothing else.

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Blind Egyptian female orchestra enthralls audience

Playing an instrument, especially in an orchestra, requires talent, skill and hard work.

But the musicians in this particular orchestra from the Egyptian capital of Cairo have to contend with an extra challenge as every single member is blind.

El Nour Wal Amal Association offers free education, literacy programs and vocational training to over 300 blind women and girls and manages the female orchestra for the blind girls.

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Daniel Barenboim: A musical path to peace

Daniel Barenboim: A musical path to peace | Sounds of Change | Scoop.it

Music, an escape from reality? Not to world-renowned Israeli Argentine-born conductor Daniel Barenboim, who believes that music rather creates a bigger reality.

 

“A great piece of music is like a whole life, it deals in sounds with problems of mankind .... You have everything you have in human life. You have conflict, love, strategy, possibility to develop ideas,” he explains.

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Music and the Brain « Chicago Council on Science and Technology

Music and the Brain « Chicago Council on Science and Technology | Sounds of Change | Scoop.it
Music surrounds us — but why does this art form take such a dominant role in our lives? What happens in our mind when we hear music and how does it effect our emotions? Even with passive listening to music, specific parts of the brain can ...

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Imagine - John Lennon Largest Guitar Ensemble at Darjeeling

Darjeeling Hills came alive with the sound of music on 3 January when nearly 600 guitarists strummed and rendered John Lennon's 'Imagine' as a tribute to Del...
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pedro reyes: imagine - musical performance

the mexican artist has created a set of 50 fully functioning musical instruments including a flute, guitar and drum kit fabricated out of a variety of firearms…
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Musician finds inspiration on streets of Romanian shanty town | Songlines World Music News

Musician finds inspiration on streets of Romanian shanty town | Songlines World Music News | Sounds of Change | Scoop.it
Tim Bennett's passion for Eastern European Gypsy music has led him to work alongside charities to raise money for Romanian communities and musicians. 

 

While visiting a Gypsy camp with Katie Cloke, Bennett was surprised by the level of musicianship many of them were able to achieve; “Despite the fact the families live in what amounts to a shanty town, they were welcoming and shared their time and what little they had with us. It was a very humbling experience.”

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FRANCE: Erasmus+ Jeunesse - BalsiKa : quand un rêve utopique devient réalité

FRANCE: Erasmus+ Jeunesse - BalsiKa : quand un rêve utopique devient réalité | Sounds of Change | Scoop.it

Quand la musique rassemble les jeunes européens... Un orchestre est né. Bientôt en France ce mois-ci en décembre 2013. BalsiKa !

 

Tout est parti de petites musiques glanées sur les chemins, racines musicales de notre culture européenne. Puis sont venus les voyages, les rencontres, le partage. D’abord quelques Français et Bosniens. Puis des Serbes, des Croates, Et petit à petit des Monténégrins, des Macédoniens, des Turcs, des Allemands. 

 

Depuis 2010, six échanges de  jeunes, soutenus financièrement par le programme Jeunesse en action, la DRAC Alsace, l’OFAJ et les Municipalités de Strasbourg et Tuzla ont permis à 227 jeunes d’échanger des musiques mais aussi des idées, d’élargir leur univers, d’œuvrer pour la réconciliation, la fraternité.

 

L’amitié de cette jeunesse multiethnique, leurs regards complices sur scène, la beauté des ces musiques simples et puissantes contredisent les discours pessimistes.

 

BalsiKa s’élargit en 2014 et des contacts ont été pris en Albanie, au Kosovo, en Macédoine, Roumanie, à Chypre. Le site internet avec mp3 et partitions téléchargeables gratuitement, des répétitions skype faciliteront l’intégration de nouveaux groupes et le partage.

 

Les musiciens de Papyros'N-BalsiKa, sous la direction de Jean-Claude Chojcan et Nedim Tinjic
vous invitent à partager des moments festifs. Ils seront en France en décembre 2013, à Strasbourg, et à Paris.Samedi 14 décembre à 20:30 : Concert à l’église protestante 144 rte du Polygone à Strasbourg-NeudorfLundi 16 décembre 20h : Spectacle Balkanzug à l’auditorium de la Cité de la Musique de Strasbourg Jeudi 19 décembre 20h : Spectacle Balkanzug à l’Auberge de Jeunesse Pajol Paris XVIIIè)

Deux CD BalsiKa sont nés de ces échanges (2010, 2013) ainsi qu'un court-métrage. 

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Childhood music lessons 'leave lasting brain boost'

Childhood music lessons 'leave lasting brain boost' | Sounds of Change | Scoop.it

Learning a musical instrument as a child gives the brain a boost that lasts long into adult life, say scientists. Adults who used to play an instrument, even if they have not done so in decades, have a faster brain response to speech sounds, research suggests. The more years of practice during childhood, the faster the brain response was, the small study found. The Journal of Neuroscience work looked at 44 people in their 50s, 60s and 70s.

 

The volunteers in the study listened to a synthesised speech syllable, "da", while researchers measured electrical activity in the region of the brain that processes sound information - the auditory brainstem.

Despite none of the study participants having played an instrument in nearly 40 years, those who completed between four and 14 years of music training early in life had a faster response to the speech sound than those who had never been taught music. The study took place at the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory at Northwestern University in Illinois, US.

 

Lifelong skill

As people grow older, they often experience changes in the brain that compromise hearing. For instance, the brains of older adults show a slower response to fast-changing sounds, which is important for interpreting speech.

It could be that learning an instrument in childhood causes a fixed change in the brain that is retained throughout life.

Or, music classes somehow prepare the brain for future auditory learning, say the researchers.

Past work by the same team found younger adults were better listeners if they had been taught an instrument as a child.

Experts also believe musical training - with an emphasis on rhythmic skills - can exercise the auditory-system.

But these studies are all relatively small and cannot ascertain if it is definitely musical training that is causing the effect.

Arguably, children offered the opportunity to learn an instrument, which can be expensive, may come from more privileged backgrounds and this may have an influence.

Commenting on the study, Michael Kilgard from the University of Texas, who was not involved with the research, said: "Being a millisecond faster may not seem like much, but the brain is very sensitive to timing and a millisecond compounded over millions of neurons can make a real difference in the lives of older adults."

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Just a few years of early musical training benefits the brain later in life

Just a few years of early musical training benefits the brain later in life | Sounds of Change | Scoop.it
Older adults who took music lessons as children but haven’t actively played an instrument in decades have a faster brain response to a speech sound than individuals who never played an instrument.

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Andrew McCluskey's curator insight, November 13, 2013 1:59 PM

And to finish the trio of Nina Kraus references this morning - here's her latest work on how music training in early life can benefit you later on.  It seems that if you studied music as a kid - for at least 4 years - regardless of whether you never played again as an adult - in later life you will still respond to speech faster than someone who had no early musical training.  If you increased the amount of musical training - say up to 14 years - the response time was even faster.  Again - the takeaway here is as you age the systems slow down and response time gets slower (think about speaking to an elderly relative.) early musical training seems to offset that decline - and hell - who doesn't want that!?  So - is your kid having music lessons yet?

 

Image credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/iita-media-library/5126136130/

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Music against child labour

Maestro Claudio Abbado and the Orchestra Mozart launched the "Music Against Child Labour" Initiative at a concert at the Salle Pleyel in Paris, France on 11 June 2013. The Initiative, from the ILO's International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour (IPEC) together with its partners in the world of music, calls on orchestras, choirs and musicians of all genres worldwide to dedicate one concert in their planned repertoire between October 2013 and December 2014 to raise awareness about child labour.

 

The Heliopolis Orchestra will open the global concert series on 8 October at the III Global Conference on Child Labour in Brazil. The Initiative also seeks to encourage further action to engage children in musical activity and education to promote their social inclusion and help protect them against child labour.

 

Pledge your support at:

http://www.ilo.org/ipec/Campaignandadvocacy/MusicInitiative/lang--en/index.htm

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Choir singers’ hearts beat as one

Choir singers’ hearts beat as one | Sounds of Change | Scoop.it
Singing together can be an emotional experience.  As churchgoers, choir singers or sports fans raise their voices as one, they feel connected.

Turns out, that connection may have a physiological foundation.

Via Andrew McCluskey
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Andrew McCluskey's curator insight, July 9, 2013 1:11 PM

I love that there has been a surge in the public consciousness in regards to choirs, singing and just the general, well, awesomeness of music.  This is another of those tiny sample studies with potentially huge implications if we an get some statistical viability.  In essence - the participation in a joint musical endeavor can have a direct synchronous effect on the human beings; which when you think about it is pretty gnarly.

Natasha Lambie's curator insight, September 23, 2013 10:18 AM

The intensity of the stadium chorus of "You'll never walk alone" at the recent Manchester United game in Melbourne beautifully illustrates this article. 

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El Sistema and the Transformative Power of Music

An interview with Tricia Tunstall. Via Sustainable Cities Collective.

Tricia Tunstall is the author of Changing Lives: Gustavo Dudamel, El Sistema, and the Transformative Power of Music, released this year by W. W. Norton. She speaks and writes widely on El Sistema in Venezuela, in the U.S.,d and across the world. She is a lifelong music educator as well as writer; her previous book, Note By Note: A Celebration of the Piano Lesson, published by Simon & Schuster, explores the joys and rewards of teaching piano.

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YO! Fest 2013 interviews: What music means and why music for youth?

The JMI team recently spent two awesome days at YO! Fest 2013 on the Esplanade of the European Parliament in Brussels advocating for music as a tool to make a difference in then lives of young people and children across the continent. We hanged out with Captain Europe and everyone from everywhere asking them what music means to them and why is it important for young people. Check out the result! 


YO!Fest 2013 was organized by the European Youth Forum in partnership with JMI,ESA, IDEA, Skype, Euranet plus, Pure FM, FM Brussel, Waf!, 22tracks, Brusselslife, Poppunt, Palais des Sciences, Italian Cultural Institute, Namgrass, Meininger hotels and Beit live. The event was supported by the European Commission, the Belgium National Lottery, Microsoft, EU40, the Ministry of Youth of the Flemish Community in Belgium, Visit Brussels, Interrail.

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Singing, Spirituality and Islam: If Music be the Food of Love | Think Africa Press

Singing, Spirituality and Islam: If Music be the Food of Love | Think Africa Press | Sounds of Change | Scoop.it

From Timbuktu to Zanzibar and Senegal to Sudan, music can both unite and divide Muslim communities. Some see it as a problem, some as the solution.


Africa’s Muslim musicians – from Senegal’s Cheikh Lo to Mali’s Khaïra Arby to Sudan’s Camiraata to Comoros' Nawal see music as the very means of social change.


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Music 4 Peace: MALI KO

United voices of Mali. Près de 40 artistes réunis autour de Fatoumata Diawara unissent leurs voix pour composer et chanter Mali Ko, une chanson pour la paix ...
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The Only Record Store in Mauritania | Music World | VICE

The Only Record Store in Mauritania | Music World | VICE | Sounds of Change | Scoop.it
While filming in Africa we passed through Nouakchott, Mauritania, and decided to stop in the country's only record store, Saphir D'or. Turns out, it rules!
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Landfill harmonic (la orquesta reciclada)

Landfill Harmonic is an upcoming feature-length documentary about a remarkable musical orchestra in Paraguay, where the musicians play instruments made from ...
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The musician for humanity @ The 15th International Anti-Corruption Conference, Brazil, 7-10 November 2012

The musician for humanity @ The 15th International Anti-Corruption Conference, Brazil, 7-10 November 2012 | Sounds of Change | Scoop.it

At the entrance of the 15th International Anti-Corruption Conference, Mohad Jawad, welcomes attendees with the melody of his oud. He’s a sound engineer from Bahrain, but sings the voices of the people. Jawad considers himself an activist for human rights all around the world.

 

“I’m singing for Bahrain and for humanity,” he says.

 

Next to his chair and musical instrument, Jawad has installed posters representing martyrs and activists in jail.

 

He says: “There is a lot of corruption in Bahrain, people are in custody because they dared to protest and write about it. I think that we have to ask [questions] and find a solution in a conference like the IACC. Maybe it won’t be that effective, but it’s better than nothing and at least it’s a good reason for me to be here and express myself about what’s happening in Bahrain.”

 

After a talk with his friend and a sip of coffee, Jawad gets back to his oud. And whether it’s raining or not, he will sing for humanity and and the people of Bahrain during the next four days.

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