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Has the Time Come for Sacred Economics?

Has the Time Come for Sacred Economics? | Lemlem | Scoop.it
We don't need to get rid of money, says one thinker. We just need to make sure it celebrates, not denigrates, the sacred in life.

Eisenstein argues that rather than abandoning money all together, we must work to make it align with our values.

A big part of that is a rediscovery of the gift economy. A world where we do favors and provide services for people not out of like-for-like exchange, barter, or trade—but simply because we recognize our interdependence and act out of love and trust in communities we belong to.


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Economy – Cooperacy

Economy – Cooperacy | Lemlem | Scoop.it

The idea behind an diversity-based cooperative society is that wealth is redistributed in order to let every identity to have the possibility to fulfill its potential. This idea has been the base of democracies, communist and socialist systems, and capitalist-liberal ones. Capitalism accuses communism and socialism to be fake and to destroy the individual dignity. Socialism and communism instead point out that capitalism is greedy and the system brings to in-equivalence. And they're both right.

 


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Bij Peer verzeker je spullen met elkaar

Je spullen verzekeren samen met anderen. Jij kiest wat je verzekert met wie en voor hoeveel. Polisvoorwaarden hebben we niet. Dat is Peer.

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Martijn Arets | Deeleconomie in Nederland groeit: ruim 130 deelplatformen actief

Martijn Arets | Deeleconomie in Nederland groeit: ruim 130 deelplatformen actief | Lemlem | Scoop.it

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New Law Could Change France’s Food System for the Better - imposes locally sourced food in community kitchens

New Law Could Change France’s Food System for the Better - imposes locally sourced food in community kitchens | Lemlem | Scoop.it

French Parliament has voted in favor of a law that could revolutionize their food system. 


The upper chamber of France’s parliament has passed a law requiring all of the nation’s “collective restaurants” (school cafeterias, hospital cafeterias, senior living communities, prisons and other state institutions) to source at least 40 percent of their food locally. The proposal will need to be approved by the French Senate before it becomes law. 

 

In addition to being locally sourced, the food served must be in season, organically grown and certified ecologically sustainable.

 

While the law does not have a set definition of “local”, different recommendations will be given depending on the product and the geographical area. Currently, those recommendations are estimated to be about a 30-kilometer radius (around 19 miles) for fruit and vegetables and a 100-kilometer radius (about 63 miles) for foods that need processing before consumption (i.e. meat, grains). 

 

The ultimate goal of the law, according to the text, is to restructure the food system in France, stimulate local economies, and shorten the food supply chain to a minimum...



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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, February 3, 12:55 PM

France is getting serious about locally grown, organic sustainable food...

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Book of the Week: Gregg Lahood's critique of new age narcissism | P2P Foundation

Book of the Week: Gregg Lahood's critique of new age narcissism | P2P Foundation | Lemlem | Scoop.it
New Age transpersonalism leans toward a restrictive non-relational spirituality because of its historical affirmation of individualism and transcendence. Relational spirituality (which is central to the emerging participatory-paradigm) swims against strong and popular currents in New Age-transpersonal thinking, belief, and practice which tend to see spirituality as an individual, personal, ?inner‘ pursuit (often) into Eastern/Oriental non-dualism …

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Don’t start an organisation. — HOW TO BE CLEAR

Don't start an organisation. - HOW TO BE CLEAR - Medium
When you need to get something done and you can’t do it yourself, then you need help.
When you need a lot of help, you n…
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Mapping the emerging post-capitalist paradigm, and its main thinkers | P2P Foundation

Mapping the emerging post-capitalist paradigm, and its main thinkers | P2P Foundation | Lemlem | Scoop.it
2 diagrams that map the big picture of the emerging post-capitalist paradigm, underpinned by peer-to-peer and collaborative dimensions.
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The incredible plan to make money grow on trees | Sam Knight

The incredible plan to make money grow on trees | Sam Knight | Lemlem | Scoop.it
The long read: One of the most cutting-edge projects to tackle climate change is being pioneered in one of the most remote, undeveloped countries on earth. Does it have any hope of succeeding?

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victor g martinez's curator insight, November 26, 2015 1:54 PM

Powerful stories, interesting ideas

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Community Credit: The Next Generation of Financial Architecture – Biomimicry Institute

Community Credit: The Next Generation of Financial Architecture – Biomimicry Institute | Lemlem | Scoop.it

Like the natural world itself, the community credit landscape is diverse and dynamic and will never be fixed in a single pattern. That said, it is possible to recognize three distinct cultures that have emerged among these systems so far.  


They are LETS (Local Exchange Trading Systems), Business-to-Business (B2B) trading systems, and TimeBanks.  


Each of these groups organizes somewhat differently and uses different systems, but they’re all premised on the same basic principle of mutual credit exchange.  


A community credit facility results any time a group of people or organizations comes together and agrees to directly issue credit to each other for their own goods and services. (Some groups have a different way of describing this, but the result is the same.)  


This is usually called mutual credit, and it’s the most democratic form of credit creation: we issue credit ourselves backed by our own promises to redeem it in the future.  Organize these promises together, and you’ve got a bottom-up credit facility...


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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, November 24, 2015 7:44 AM

Credit is just as good as money. We can give each other credit. That means we can use our own money, no longer depending on the banks and the speculators...

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Scientists harvest energy AND internet from the same solar panel using only light

Scientists harvest energy AND internet from the same solar panel using only light | Lemlem | Scoop.it

It's called Li-Fi and it may bring internet to half the world


Professor Harold Haas and his team have essentially unlocked what is known as "Li-Fi," or Light Fidelity and are using simple LED light sources to power their internet and deliver the information in one packet.  

 

“The potential expansion to the internet is massive and my aspiration is that this broadband solar panel receiver technology for Li-Fi will help solve the challenges of the digital divide throughout the world," Haas says.


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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, November 22, 2015 1:32 PM

What's good about this is that it will decrease the load of microwave energy we absorb from the ever expanding network of WiFi routers and perhaps in time the mobile phones as well. 

And here's another article with some more data...

http://www.sciencealert.com/li-fi-tested-in-the-real-world-for-the-first-time-is-100-times-faster-than-wi-fi

 

Lishui K Springford's curator insight, December 9, 2015 5:52 PM

Oh what a glorious time we live in!

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Why Not Just Print More Money?

Why Not Just Print More Money? | Lemlem | Scoop.it

A prominent economist has a radical proposal for stimulating the economy: just add money to everyone’s bank account. It is crazy enough to work? 

 

Adair Turner, an academic, policymaker, and member of the House of Lords, has another idea. In his new book, “Between Debt and the Devil: Money, Credit, and Fixing Global Finance” (Princeton), Lord Turner argues that countries facing the predicament of onerous debts, low interest rates, and slow growth should consider a radical but alluringly simple option: create more money and hand it out to people. 


“A government could, for instance, pay $1000 to all citizens by electronic transfer to their commercial bank deposit accounts,” Turner writes. People could spend the money as they saw fit: on food, clothes, household goods, vacations, drinking binges—anything they liked. Demand across the economy would get a boost, Turner notes, “and the extent of that stimulus would be broadly proportional to the value of new money created.” 


The figure of a thousand dollars is meant to be strictly illustrative. It could just as easily be five thousand dollars or ten thousand dollars—however much was needed to drag the economy out of the doldrums


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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, November 23, 2015 1:40 PM

We are a bit slow to realise it, but what is the use of money or an economy if the majority of people are excluded from participation because they have no or too little money?

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Narrow Wavelength of UV Light Safely Kills Drug-Resistant Bacteria - Columbia University Medical Center

Narrow Wavelength of UV Light Safely Kills Drug-Resistant Bacteria - Columbia University Medical Center | Lemlem | Scoop.it

Scientists from Columbia University’s Center for Radiological Research have shown that a narrow wavelength of ultraviolet light safely killed drug-resistant MRSA bacteria in mice, suggesting its potential to reduce surgical site infections. 

 

A paper just published by PLOS ONE describes how the Columbia team found that a particular wavelength of UV light known as “far-UVC” (in this instance, 207 nanometers) is not only as effective as conventional germicidal UV light in killing MRSA, as shown in their previously published study, but also shows for the first time that, unlike conventional germicidal UV, far-UVC does not cause biological damage to exposed skin.


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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, June 12, 12:43 PM

This should ease the pressure on having to use antibiotics for surgery ...

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Toronto Gets Its Own Free, Encrypted Mesh Network

Toronto Gets Its Own Free, Encrypted Mesh Network | Lemlem | Scoop.it

Free internet for all. 

 

Meshnet networks, or meshnets, are a form of intranet that doesn’t require a central router point. Instead of emitting from a single point, they’re distributed across an entire system of nodes. Accessing one is free—and doesn’t require the services of a telecom. 

 

Lau had spent the previous summer chatting with other meshnet enthusiasts in Europe, trying to figure out the best way to set up routers across the city. He suggested it was time to give it a try in Toronto. What grew out of Lau and Iantorno’s meeting, four months ago now, was a plan to build a meshnet in this city—one where users wouldn’t need to worry about eavesdroppers, because it would be encrypted. 

 

When it’s finished, Toronto’s first free-to-use meshnet should provide an accessible and secure internet community, maintained by locals keen on becoming digitally self-sufficient. Those early adopters could reshape our relationship to internet providers, and cut monthly rates out of the picture.


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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, May 8, 10:43 AM

"If you're depending on someone else to set up everything for you, then they're in control."

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The Real Reason Wheat is Toxic (it’s not the gluten)

The Real Reason Wheat is Toxic (it’s not the gluten) | Lemlem | Scoop.it

You’re going to want to sit down for this one. I’ve had some folks burst into tears in horror when I passed along this information before. 

 

Wheat harvest protocol in the United States is to drench the wheat fields with Roundup several days before the combine harvesters work through the fields as withered, dead wheat plants are less taxing on the farm equipment and allows for an earlier, easier and bigger harvest  

 

Pre-harvest application of the herbicide Roundup or other herbicides containing the deadly active ingredient glyphosate to wheat and barley as a desiccant was suggested as early as 1980.  It has since become routine over the past 15 years and is used as a drying agent 7-10 days before harvest within the conventional farming community.



Read more at: http://www.getholistichealth.com/43076/the-real-reason-wheat-is-toxic-its-not-the-gluten/


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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, April 10, 12:53 PM

How come you allow and even recommend (it's the harvest 'protocol') glyphosate poison to be applied to a food grain 7 to 10 days before harvest?

Is it any wonder people get sick eating foods containing wheat? 

Here's a campaign to get the European Union to end use of the poison altogether...

https://actions.sumofus.org/pages/tell-the-european-parliament-to-vote-cancer-causing-glyphosate-out-of-europe

 

Naomie Mullins's comment, April 10, 7:13 PM
Fructose inhibits the stimulation of insulin by glucose, so this means that eating ordinary sugar, sucrose (a disaccharide, consisting of glucose and fructose), in place of starch, will reduce the tendency to store fat. Eating “complex carbohydrates,” rather than sugars, is a reasonable way to promote obesity. Eating starch, by increasing insulin and lowering the blood sugar, stimulates the appetite, causing a person to eat more, so the effect on fat production becomes much larger than when equal amounts of sugar and starch are eaten. The obesity itself then becomes an additional physiological factor; the fat cells create something analogous to an inflammatory state. There isn't anything wrong with a high carbohydrate diet, and even a high starch diet isn't necessarily incompatible with good health, but when better foods are available they should be used instead of starches. For example, fruits have many advantages over grains, besides the difference between sugar and starch. Bread and pasta consumption are strongly associated with the occurrence of diabetes, fruit consumption has a strong inverse association.
http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/glycemia.shtml
Naomie Mullins's comment, April 10, 7:24 PM
Dr Ray Peat also says...
After decades of “education” to promote eating starchy foods, obesity is a bigger problem than ever, and more people are dying of diabetes than previously. The age-specific incidence of most cancers is increasing, too, and there is evidence that starch, such as pasta, contributes to breast cancer, and possibly other types of cancer.

The epidemiology would appear to suggest that complex carbohydrates cause diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. If the glycemic index is viewed in terms of the theory that hyperglycemia, by way of “glucotoxicity,” causes the destruction of proteins by glycation, which is seen in diabetes and old age, that might seem simple and obvious.
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Meet the doctor who says medications are killing you - Peter Gotzsche, founder of the Cochrane Collaboration

Meet the doctor who says medications are killing you - Peter Gotzsche, founder of the Cochrane Collaboration | Lemlem | Scoop.it

Many of our most commonly used drugs, from painkillers to antidepressants, are dangerous and are killing us off in large numbers, says a  leading researcher visiting Australia next week. 

 

Peter Gotzsche, a co-founder of the Cochrane Collaboration, the world's foremost body in assessing medical evidence, arrives in Australia on Monday for a whirlwind speaking tour warning Australians about their use of prescription medications. 

 

He estimates that 100,000 people in the United States alone die each year from the side-effects of correctly used drugs. Similar figures are not available in Australia, although the Australian Bureau of Statistics estimates that 3000 people died after complications with medical and surgical care in 2012. 

 

"It's remarkable that nobody raises an eyebrow when we kill so many of our own citizens with drugs," Professor Gotzsche, who heads the Nordic Cochrane Centre, told Fairfax Media ahead of his visit.

 


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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, February 14, 6:18 AM

We might become complacent at times and think that our doctors must know what they are doing, that what they are prescribing is gong to help us.

Not so, says a scientist whose life work is the analysis of medical research. There are many drugs to avoid like the plague...

Naomie Mullins's comment, February 14, 11:28 AM
this film illustrates the same thing
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HyeC9IiFKpw
Sylvana Simon's curator insight, February 25, 4:26 PM

Scary but so true - as a registered nurse I have seen the negative effects of prescription drugs on health over and over and over again...of course they have their place sometimes, and in emergencies they can save lives. For most long term prescription drugs there is a price somewhere else in the body. I lost my father last year, and I know in my heart of hearts that his total compliance with medication prescribed for him by his well intentioned doctor, finally led to the complications which ended his life.

 

A doctor once told me a true story about a woman he knew in a nursing home that was dying - the whole family were called to be with her, and medication was ceased while they waited for her to die. For a few days she got worse each day and then better, and better, and better. So much so that she was able to leave the nursing home and go to live with family!!

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Democratic Money and Capital for the Commons - Commons Strategies

Democratic Money and Capital for the Commons - Commons Strategies | Lemlem | Scoop.it
One of the more complicated issues facing most commons is how to raise capital in the face of dominant systems of finance hostile to commoning.
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A huge chunk of a tardigrade's genome comes from foreign DNA

A huge chunk of a tardigrade's genome comes from foreign DNA | Lemlem | Scoop.it

Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have sequenced the genome of the nearly indestructible tardigrade, the only animal known to survive the extreme environment of outer space, and found something they never expected: that they get a huge chunk of their genome - nearly one-sixth or 17.5 percent - from foreign DNA. 

 

"We had no idea that an animal genome could be composed of so much foreign DNA," said co-author Bob Goldstein, faculty in the biology department in UNC's College of Arts and Sciences. "We knew many animals acquire foreign genes, but we had no idea that it happens to this degree."

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-11-huge-chunk-tardigrade-genome-foreign.html#jCp


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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, November 25, 2015 4:41 PM

"We think of the tree of life, with genetic material passing vertically from mom and dad," said Boothby. "But with horizontal gene transfer becoming more widely accepted and more well known, at least in certain organisms, it is beginning to change the way we think about evolution and inheritance of genetic material and the stability of genomes. So instead of thinking of the tree of life, we can think about the web of life and genetic material crossing from branch to branch. So it's exciting. We are beginning to adjust our understanding of how evolution works."

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Slavoj Žižek, Yanis Varoufakis and Julian Assange - Social Europe

Slavoj Žižek, Yanis Varoufakis and Julian Assange - Social Europe | Lemlem | Scoop.it
Social Europe
Slavoj Žižek, Yanis Varoufakis and Julian Assange
Social Europe
Philosopher Slavoj Žižek, former Greek finance minister Yanis Varoufakis and Wikileaks founder Julian Assange discuss Europe's future.

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Trōv - the standalone digital platform that enables an entirely new way to insure the things people care about

Trōv - the standalone digital platform that enables an entirely new way to insure the things people care about | Lemlem | Scoop.it
By Rick Huckstep The future for personal lines insurance is all about “engagement”. When insurance becomes a lifestyle choice, then consumer perception will change. And so will their behaviour  Thi...

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Een beetje gekte is goed voor de creativiteit - New Scientist

Een beetje gekte is goed voor de creativiteit - New Scientist | Lemlem | Scoop.it
Voor de creativiteit is het goed om een beetje maf te zijn, blijkt uit een internationale studie, uitgevoerd op IJslandse bodem.

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The unified triple operating system for a networked society

The unified triple operating system for a networked society | Lemlem | Scoop.it

the unified triple operating system

Governance, business, and learning models are moving from centralized control to network-centric foundations.

 

For instance, coalition governments are increasing in frequency, businesses are organizing in value networks, and collaborative and connected learning is becoming widespread. 


In these cases, collaboration (working for a common objective) and cooperation (sharing freely without direct reciprocity) flow both ways. 


The networked organization trinity is based on the Triple-A organization, as proposed by Valdis Krebs. It is structured to take advantage of the complexity and noisiness of social networks, allowing information to flow as freely as possible, and affording workers the space to make sense of it and share their experiences and knowledge. 


The underlying concept of the trinity model is that organizations and their people are members of many different types of networks, communities of practice, and close-knit collaborative work teams.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, November 23, 2015 8:24 AM

Co-operatives are one face of a networked society, but there must also be freedom to act and experiment on an individual level and in small, informal groups, which will allow us to bring what we learn into the network...

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Noam Chomsky How to Fight Terrorism (2015)

Noam Chomsky 2015, Videos 2015, Noam chomsky conference 2015, noam chomsky debate 2015, noam chomsky conversation 2015, noam chomsky ...

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Swiss citizens’ initiative collects 105,000 signatures, triggers referendum on Money Creation

Swiss citizens’ initiative collects 105,000 signatures, triggers referendum on Money Creation | Lemlem | Scoop.it

Under the Swiss Federal Constitution, if a petition gathers at least 100,000 signatures within 18 months, a referendum is held on the issue a few years later. 

 

“In a nutshell, the proposal extends the Swiss Federation’s existing exclusive right to create coins and notes, to also include deposits.With the full power of new money creation exclusively in the hands of the Swiss National Bank, the commercial banks would no longer have the power to create money through lending.


The Swiss National Bank’s primary role becomes the management of the money supply relative to the productive economy, while the decision concerning how new money is introduced debt free into the economy would reside with the government”, reads the official website of the initiative. 


In Switzerland, referendums are usually organised 3 to 5 years after a popular initiative succeeds. The proposals first have to be debated by the Federal government and Parliament. In case the Parliament decides to adopt a proposal into law immediately, the organisers of the initiative have the right to renounce the referendum, hence speeding up the implementation of the proposal. However, this is very rare case, as most initiatives are ultimately submitted to a nationwide referendum.


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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, November 18, 2015 7:17 AM

Citizens' initiative in Switzerland to take money creation away from commercial banks. Next step is debate and then a referendum of all Swiss citizens.