Sorghum
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Sorghum - How to Use Sorghum in Gluten-Free Recipes

Sorghum - How to Use Sorghum in Gluten-Free Recipes | Sorghum | Scoop.it
Learn more about sorghum, its nutritional properties and how to use it in gluten free recipes.
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Picture of cultivated sorghum

Picture of cultivated sorghum | Sorghum | Scoop.it
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Cultivated not dixie sorghum

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Survival in Utah's Dixie - Utah Historical Markers on Waymarking.com

Survival in Utah's Dixie - Utah Historical Markers on Waymarking.com | Sorghum | Scoop.it
This Historical Marker is mounted on a steel post near the pioneer family monument at the Hurricane Valley Heritage Park & Museum located at 35 W State Street in Hurricane, Utah.
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Poem further down on the page.

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Sorghum Flour: Amazon.com: Grocery & Gourmet Food

Sorghum Flour

Product by Authentic Foods More about this product
Price: $16.95
For the best selection anywhere shop Amazon Grocery for all of your pantry needs. Use Subscribe and Save to save an additional 5% on your regular groceries with free-automatic delivery.
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Sorghum - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

About 30 species, see text

Sorghum is a genus of numerous species of grasses, one of which is raised for grain and many of which are used as fodder plants, either cultivated or as part of pasture. The plants are cultivated in warmer climates worldwide. Species are native to tropical and subtropical regions of all continents in addition to the southwest Pacific and Australasia. Sorghum is in the subfamily Panicoideae and the tribe of Andropogoneae (the tribe of big bluestem and sugar cane).

One species, Sorghum bicolor,[1] is an important world crop, used for food (as grain and in sorghum syrup or "sorghum molasses"), fodder, the production of alcoholic beverages, and biofuels. Most varieties are drought- and heat-tolerant, and are especially important in arid regions, where the grain is one of the staples for poor and rural people. These varieties form important components of pastures in many tropical regions. Sorghum bicolor is an important food crop in Africa, Central America, and South Asia and is the "fifth most important cereal crop grown in the world".[2]

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