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Consumer Health Engagement Platform Novu Raises $20M

Consumer Health Engagement Platform Novu Raises $20M | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Novu Raises $20M To Expand consumer health engagement platform
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The Best Wearables Will Be The Ones You Throw Away

The Best Wearables Will Be The Ones You Throw Away | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
How do you measure the success of wearables? When you don't need them at all.

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Kevin Jones's curator insight, April 7, 4:04 PM

Great, unique view of the industry wearables!

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Holograms Will Let Doctors See 3-D Views of Our Insides | WIRED

Holograms Will Let Doctors See 3-D Views of Our Insides | WIRED | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Biomedical imaging is stuck on 2-D screens. But new holographic technologies are bringing those images into the real, three-dimensional world.
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How can we create better websites for the health sector?

How can we create better websites for the health sector? | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
In an increasingly digital world, NHS websites must be built around patients' needs, says Jacob Dutton

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Is it time we teach medical students about wearables?

Is it time we teach medical students about wearables? | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

The growing wearable sensor market is yielding ever-increasing amounts of consumer-derived digital data. These data can consistent of many different physiologic measures such as heart rate and rhythm, sleep quality, brain activity, and physical activity levels. As many consumers and commercial organizations look toward using wearables to monitor medical conditions, clinicians may begin to find themselves in the role of a digital data decoder.

 

This will be no easy task, as a number of factors will complicate the decoding and force the clinician to become a digital detective. First, medical settings largely rely on using technologies and equipment that have been tested and validated for medical use. In contrast, most wearables are consumer products, and while they produce digital data, this does not mean the data are reliable or valid for medical use.

Secondly, most clinicians have limited awareness and formal training in how to evaluate wearables and the data they produce. Therefore, from a knowledge perspective, clinicians are disempowered from assessing the data they are presented with.

 

Finally, even if we have impactful and valid consumer-derived data, we must integrate the presentation of this data into the clinician workflow. Without workflow integration, clinicians will be disempowered from using these data from a process perspective. Clinicians need a time-efficient method of storing and standardizing the data obtained from different devices.

 

Lagging far behind our ability to collect data is the value driver for all of our sensor-driven devices or apps: big data analytics. Powerful analytics turn “bad” data into data that can drive improvements in medical treatment, research and cost efficiency. Pharmaceutical companies are beginning to see the value of data from wearable devices and are increasingly incorporating them into clinical trials in order to better understand disease processes. Health and technology collaborations like the one between UCSF and Samsung, to create the Center for Digital Health Innovation, are important in helping to make sense of all the available digital data and devices, and in defining which are the most useful and relevant to health care.

 

Many questions remain unanswered: Is it time we teach medical students about wearables? How soon will we prescribe a sensor or an app with a pill? Will big data drive the next generation of medical discoveries? I believe we should be preparing for all of these now.

 


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The Digital Divide in pharma

The Digital Divide in pharma | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Across Health blog: the Digital Divide in pharma: HCPs’ needs exceed pharma’s digital offerings, particularly in the medical space. Want to learn more?

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Patient Engagement Tools: 11 Consumer & Physician Trends

Patient Engagement Tools: 11 Consumer & Physician Trends | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
eClinicalWorks survey reveals 11 trends on the recent state of advances in patient engagement tools from the perspective of the consumer and physician.
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Prescription for Innovation | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers

Prescription for Innovation | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Jamie Hartford The task of making medical devices today may be harder than ever before. It’s no longer enough for designers and engineers to simply focus on innovation. They also have to find ways to prove that their devices improve patient outcomes or, at the very least, reduce costs In this cost-conscious environment, providers are growing increasingly picky when it comes to the technologies they embrace.
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1 Out of 3 Doctors Suggesting Mobile Health Apps To Their Patients

1 Out of 3 Doctors Suggesting Mobile Health Apps To Their Patients | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
According to Endocrinology Advisor, more than one-third of all doctors are now suggesting mobile apps to their patients. It is also expected that in the coming
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Google Ventures GP highlights complexities of using digital health to help disadvantaged patients

Google Ventures GP highlights complexities of using digital health to help disadvantaged patients | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Given Google Ventures’ profile in healthcare investment, the companies it chooses to back make folks sit up and take notice. In a rare talk, Google Ventures General Partner Dr. Krishna Yeshwant...
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Typing patterns could help identify early onset of parkinson's disease

Typing patterns could help identify early onset of parkinson's disease | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
 SOURCE: Neuroscience News April 2, 2015 Analyzing people’s keystrokes as they type on a computer keyboard can reveal a great deal of information about the state of their motor function, according to a new study from MIT.In a paper appearing in Scientific Reports, the researchers found that their algorithm for analyzing keystrokes could distinguish between typing done in the middle of the night, when sleep deprivation impairs motor skills, and typing performed when fully rested.The study, which grew out of the Madrid-MIT M+Vision Consortium, is based on the premise that “there might be hidden information in the way that we type,” says Ian Butterworth, one of the authors and an M+Vision fellow. “At the moment, pretty much all of the other information in typing is thrown out. We just pay attention to what keys are being pressed, not when or for how long.”While this study focused on the effects of fatigue, it also represents a first step toward using keystroke patterns to diagnose
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A Social Network Designed to Combat Depression | WIRED

A Social Network Designed to Combat Depression | WIRED | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Panoply is a crowdsourced website for improving mental health, created at MIT.
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Ayogo raises $2.5M Series A to accelerate growth of gaming platform for chronic conditions

Ayogo raises $2.5M Series A to accelerate growth of gaming platform for chronic conditions | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Ayogo, a Vancouver-based digital health company, has raised $2.5 million in a Series A round to boost sales and marketing for a gaming platform to encourage people with chronic conditions to...
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AARP: Consumer has to be at the center of product development and testing for digital health

AARP: Consumer has to be at the center of product development and testing for digital health | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
The work to initiate the AARP’s digital health initiative Project Catalyst to set up a way for seniors to roadtest wearables and apps in a series of studies was a...

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5 ways in which digital health analytics will change healthcare | mHealthNews

There are many reasons why digital technologies hope to improve patient care as well as the state of healthcare itself.
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Pharma Is from Mars, Patients Are from Venus

One key problem for pharmaceutical companies trying to engage with patients: they don’t speak the same language.

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Following the Social Media Rules for Pharma and Medical Device Companies

Following the Social Media Rules for Pharma and Medical Device Companies | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

"To tweet or not to tweet?" is often the question for pharmaceutical and medical device companies when it comes to advertising their products in the burgeoning social media environment.

The very specific rules the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has regarding marketing for drugs and devices makes it difficult to market products on platforms like Twitter, Facebook and blogs. Counsel representing these companies should be familiar with several interpretive guidance documents the FDA released last year that help explain the agency's thinking as it grapples with emerging and future social media platforms. The issuance of guidance on social media was required by the 2012 "Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act" (FDASIA), Section 1121. This required the FDA to, by August 2014, "issue guidance that describes FDA policy regarding the promotion, using the Internet (including social media), of medical products that are regulated by [the FDA]." The FDA complied and issued three sets of guidance related to social media in 2014, with two more still pending. Though these guidance documents are not regulations, they represent the FDA's current thinking and best practice is to follow and comply with them.

Spatially Challenged

One of the guidance documents addresses social media platforms with limited character spacing. The most common example of such a platform is Twitter, which is limited to 140 characters for a single tweet. The FDA guidance says that if an "accurate and balanced" presentation of both risks and benefits is not possible within the constraints of the specific platform, the company should reconsider using that platform. In other words, if a company cannot present both the benefits and the warnings and risks about a product in the space provided, it should not advertise it there.

The FDA rules on labeling govern how a company is allowed to market its product. The agency requires company advertising to meet several requirements: be truthful and non-misleading (FD&C Act 502(a), 201(n)); include certain information, such as the indicated use and risks (21 CFR 201.100(d), 201.105(d), 801.109(d)); be prominently placed on the label; and any advertisement that makes representations about drugs must include certain risk information (502(n), 21 CFR 202.1). Advertising on social media must be presented in a fair and balanced way.

Handling Misinformation

Most of us are familiar with Internet "trolls," those sometimes angry and often misinformed commenters to online articles or blog posts. What happens, however, when someone posts something online about your client's medical device or drug that is false? What if, say, this person posts that the drug is dangerous and caused Side Effect X and killed his elderly mother who had diabetes? What if the company knows the drug does not cause Side Effect X, or the drug was specifically labeled warning people with diabetes to not take it? It is these types of situations where a company may feel the need to say something—so others do not take the drug incorrectly and to protect its brand.

The FDA has issued guidance on this type of situation. The agency understands a company cannot be the sheriff of the Internet and correct, much less know about, each instance of someone saying something wrong about a company's product. Its guidance states a company is not responsible for user-generated content on social media platforms it does not operate or control. This means that if misinformation is generated in a tweet or Facebook post, the company has the option, but not the obligation, to post something and correct the misinformed poster. However, if the post is on the company's page, or in a forum the company hosts, then it is responsible for setting the record straight.

Whether the company is obligated to respond to misinformation or voluntarily chooses to respond, the FDA guidance sets forth the following specific things the company must do when responding.

1. Be relevant and responsive to the misinformation

2. Tailor the message to the misinformation

3. Be non-promotional in nature, tone and presentation

4. Be accurate

5. Be consistent with the FDA-required labeling

6. Be supported by sufficient evidence

7. Post in conjunction with the misinformation in the same area or forum

8. Disclose the person providing corrective information affiliated with the company that makes the product

Legal Implications of Social Media Rules

The FDA guidance leaves open the issue of liability faced by drug and device companies, even if complying with the rules. Specifically, "failure to warn" claims are possible for a company advertising on social media. Even if it complies with the FDA guidance, a company can still face liability over its labeling. If, for example, a company decides to tweet and tries to highlight the use of the drug with its risk, what if it only includes the most significant risk and not others? Will that expose the company to a failure to warn claim?

In addition to product liability, social media advertising raises the issue of competitors having the ability to bring suit under the Lanham Act (15 U.S.C. §1525). This law allows a private right of action so a party may sue a competitor for any false or misleading description or representation of fact which

" … in commercial advertising or promotion, misrepresents the nature, characteristics, qualities, or geographic origin of his or her or another person's goods, services or commercial activities." Pharmaceutical companies can face Lanham Act liability for many types of claims, including minimizing risks, broadening indications, overstating efficacy and making comparative claims in the absence of supporting head-to-head clinical data.



Read more: http://www.therecorder.com/id=1202721749266/Following-the-Social-Media-Rules-for-Pharma-and-Medical-Device-Companies#ixzz3VZElZUQy

 


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Six things to consider as IOT intersects medical devices

Six things to consider as IOT intersects medical devices | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
As medical device developers, we’re entering uncharted territory when it comes to IOT. We have the potential to transform healthcare...

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Jacque Myers's curator insight, April 1, 2:25 PM

SYNOPSIS:

1. Have a Reason to Connect Your Device

2. Use a Human Factors-Centered Process

3. Don’t Fake the Risk Analysis

4. Recognize New Risks & Adopt a Clear Strategy

5. Be Informed & Realistic about New Regulatory Challenges

6. Remember, It’s Still a Medical Device


“Go fast, fail early” strategies are extremely valuable for need-finding and conceptual design phases but strategies, such as the minimally viable product and ability to refine based on early adopter feedback can be problematic with medical devices.

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Virtual Reality Can have an Impact on Medical Education

Virtual Reality Can have an Impact on Medical Education | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
by John Bennett MD Browsing the internet like "Ricochet Rabbit", I came across a great video by Berci Mesko for his Futurist You Tube Channel.   Another source of almost real medical education.  Watch Berci's Video to see.   Researching deeper, I see that Virtual Reality in Education has been around a long time.  Maybe it will come into the mainstream with Google's use of Google Cardboard, making it easily accessible at low cost.  I changed the title from "Will Have", to "Can Have". Here's a good review of the science of Virtual Reality And the possibility of showing Medical Devices through Immersive Reality
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AARP, Pfizer, UnitedHealthcare team up to research digital health usability for older consumers | mobihealthnews

AARP, Pfizer, UnitedHealthcare team up to research digital health usability for older consumers | mobihealthnews | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
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Motivation: Why healthcare brands need to encourage more

Motivation: Why healthcare brands need to encourage more | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
  Healthcare, pharmaceutical and insurance companies can solve the needs of consumers by drawing inspiration from some of the most innovative companies in the world, both in and out of...
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Smartphone ownership has jumped up to 64 percent, and more than half use them to look up health conditions

Smartphone ownership has jumped up to 64 percent, and more than half use them to look up health conditions | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Almost a third of Americans are using their smartphones to look up information about health.
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Apple and IBM unveil new apps for nurses

Apple and IBM unveil new apps for nurses | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
  SOURCE April 1, 2015 Apple and IBM have unveiled three new iOS apps designed to make life easier for nurses and nurse administrators inside the hospital setting – and another for at-home caregivers. The apps, part of Apple's new MobileFirst initiative, are: Hospital RN, which uses the iPhone to replace the pager and gives nurses access to patient records, locate patients through iBeacon technology, and use push notifications to access patient requests, lab status and safety alerts. Hospital Lead for iPad, which enables hospital administrators to manage floor nurses and staff through a centralized portal and offers a single, unified view of multiple internal database. Hospital Tech, which accesses a hospital's record system to give nurses real-time access to patient requests, safety alerts and lab status. Home RN, which enables home-based caregivers to manage patient records and share information – including text, video and photos – among care team members; in addition,
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Darren Nutting's curator insight, April 6, 11:25 AM

Would you use a Nurse App from Apple and IBM? 

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Opportunities for User Experience Innovation in Wearables | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers

Opportunities for User Experience Innovation in Wearables | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Until developers of wearable devices get the user experience down pat, the technology will struggle to gain adoption. Steve McPhilliamy The Near&Dear wearable device allows remote monitoring by caregivers. The growing trend of personalized medicine and a movement toward performance-based health outcomes are both responsible for driving significant market demand for wearable technology.
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