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Silver Surfers are Catching the eHealth Wave - Accenture

Silver Surfers are Catching the eHealth Wave - Accenture | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Read article to learn how healthcare providers can attract and engage the aging population through digital channels.

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Young physicians see promise for fully connected health ecosystem

Physicians under the age of 40 are more likely to believe the industry will reach a fully connected technology environment soon, while those older than 40 think that move is at least five years away, according to a survey by MedData Point.
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Which #Pharma Companies are BIG in Social Media Engagement? Hint: Doesn't Correlate with Sales!

Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide evaluated  how  14 major pharma companies  were  performing  across  six  key  categories:  


  1. Social presence: How  many  social  networks  was  the  company  on?   
  2. Activity: Was  the  content  kept  fresh  with  regular  updates?
  3. Engagement: Were  the  companies    engaging  their  users  and  generating interest?    
  4. Social network: How  simple  and  intuitive  was  the   connection  between  social  networks?    
  5. Virality: Was  the  content  spread  around   the  social  sphere?
  6. Sommunity Size: How  big  was  the  community?

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Pharma Guy's curator insight, April 24, 9:51 AM


You may be surprised to learn that big -- in terms of sales -- pharma companies like Pfizer scored very low. Ogilvy classifies Pfizer as a company "searching for strategy." I guess Pfizer's SM "playbook" got lost (or maybe was never found!). Read more about that here: http://bit.ly/PfizerPlaybook 

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73% Of Consumers Would Not Switch to Apple Watch For Fitness Tracking

73% Of Consumers Would Not Switch to Apple Watch For Fitness Tracking | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
73% of current fitness tracking users would not consider switching to the Apple Watch for fitness tracking, according to a Treato survey of 8,700 users.
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Video: Watch med students dissect virtual 3-D cadavers

Video: Watch med students dissect virtual 3-D cadavers | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
MedCity News first got a peek at a virtual cadaver for medical education from San Jose, Calif.-based medical imaging software company Anatomage back in 2013. That technology now is in clinical use, as we learned from this video produced by the University of Connecticut Health Center and shared by the Doctors Channel.
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eCaring, Samsung To Deliver Home Care Monitoring via Galaxy Tablets

eCaring, Samsung To Deliver Home Care Monitoring via Galaxy Tablets | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
eCaring, Inc. and Samsung Business Services™ today announced delivery of technology and services that enable healthcare providers to reduce costs.
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Remote Monitoring And Improved Healthcare Management Offered with New Time Saving Mobile Health Platform

Remote Monitoring And Improved Healthcare Management Offered with New Time Saving Mobile Health Platform | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
The HealthConnect app by PilotFish Healthcare Integration, Inc. is designed to improve patient and physician communication—as well as provide remote m
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Partners HealthCare, Samsung team on chronic disease management tools

Partners HealthCare, Samsung team on chronic disease management tools | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Boston-based Partners HealthCare is teaming up with Samsung Electronics in a multi-phase mobile tech initiative with the first project focused on creating remote mHealth apps and spurring clinical research for chronic disease management.
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Apple Watch mHealth app race off to a fast start

Apple Watch mHealth app race off to a fast start | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Software developers have been busy creating apps for Apple's Watch since late last year when Apple released the iOS 8.2 SDK and then its WatchKit SDK this February. The Watch, Apple's first-ever wearable, comes with a two semi-mHealth apps that fall more on the fitness scope, including Activity and Workout.
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JAMA: Too many mHealth apps, too little verification

JAMA: Too many mHealth apps, too little verification | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
The mHealth app industry faces a slew of challenges with data security, user privacy and regulatory concerns often cited as top worries. But the potential of too many apps invading the marketplace, with many going unvetted, also is a concern that demands attention, according to a new research paper.
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Smartphone-controlled Drones Changing Emergency Response

Smartphone-controlled Drones Changing Emergency Response | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
  SOURCE April 20, 2015 Will the Smartphone controlled First Person View Drone transform how emergency services respond to major incidents and open their eyes to the 3G Video opportunity? It’s long been amazed me that mobile operators who have invested billions buying licenses and building out their 3G networks haven’t yet woken up the huge opportunity they have to enable members of the public to make video calls to emergency services and provide preferential ‘always best connected’ access for these callers. Wondering what was going to cause this idea to take off and from watching this first youtube video made by Robert Scoble with the new DJI Phantom Vision 2 Drone (that retails at just $1000 and can be carried in a small holdall) it turns out it might be something that does actually ‘take off’. It really can’t be long before all major motorway incidents are video recorded using such low cost easy to use technology because for one thing the insurance companies would see the cost
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Watson Health is IBM's 'moonshot,' here's the best health story of 2014 (Morning Read)

Watson Health is IBM's 'moonshot,' here's the best health story of 2014 (Morning Read) | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
CEO of IBM Ginni Rometty feels extremely optimistic about Watson Health and the Baird 2015 Growth Stock Conference will feature PerkinElmir.
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University of Michigan children’s hospital targets obesity with telemedicine, wearables | mobihealthnews

University of Michigan children’s hospital targets obesity with telemedicine, wearables | mobihealthnews | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
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Twitter helps predict ED visits for asthma

Twitter helps predict ED visits for asthma | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Twitter is emerging as another tool for predictive analytics in healthcare.

By collecting and mapping the location of tweets with keywords such as "asthma," "inhaler" and "wheezing," mining the EHR at Parkland Memorial Hospital, then comparing to air-quality reports in the Dallas area, researchers were able to predict asthma-related emergency department traffic with 75 percent accuracy.
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Remote monitoring cuts hospitalizations for heart failure patients

Remote monitoring cuts hospitalizations for heart failure patients | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Remote monitoring for heart failure patients resulted in fewer hospitalizations and deaths than a similar group of patients receiving usual care during a four-month study, but the benefits didn't last beyond the study period, according to...
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A brief history of the EHR

A brief history of the EHR | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

So far, 2015 has been a busy year for reflecting on the use of electronic health records (EHRs). CMS just released its proposed rules for meaningful use stage 3. One might say that “MU 3” supports the belief that the sequel is never as good as the original (though the original might not have been that good either). Earlier, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) issued its “interoperability roadmap.”


While I welcome ONC’s highlighting the importance of interoperability, I thought that waiting until now to create a roadmap is like getting your TripTik two days into your cross country road trip (after discovering that you are 500 miles off course). Dr. Bob Wachter’s book and its behind-the-scenes look at the digitization of medicine is also getting people talking. (It’s on my iPad but I haven’t started it yet.)


In February, the Annals of Internal Medicine published Clinical Documentation in the 21st Century: Executive Summary of a Policy Position Paper From the American College of Physicians, which summarizes many of the problems with documenting care using EHRs. The paper includes proposed solutions for addressing many of the deficiencies in the electronic clinical record.


All of this activity and many conversations with colleagues and patients got me thinking more about what went wrong and what went right with EHRs. I started using an EHR in 2006 BE (Before Everything) and led my practice’s selection committee, which started its search a couple of years earlier. “Before Everything” means before the CMS EHR incentive, PCMH, Meaningful Use, PQRS, ACOs, and many of the other programs, initiatives, and acronyms that we now associate with EHRs. In fact, in 2006 BE, the government was minimally involved in EHR adoption. Much of it was driven by small private practices.


So if we had to pay for it ourselves and didn’t need it for reporting or earning bonuses, why did we go electronic in 2006 BE? We thought it would help us take better care of patients through improved access to legible and complete records, allow us to start measuring how we delivered care (in a basic way, but anticipating what was coming), make us more efficient, and improve the bottom line. I’ve addressed many of these goals and how things turned out in my earlier “report card” columns (2012 and 2014).


We wanted an EHR that let us enter data however we wanted — check lists, templates, typing text, dictating, with keyboard, with handwriting recognition, or various combinations — and could meet future needs such as integrating outside data and communicating with other EHRs. And while today’s critics call it out as unimportant and even corrupting, the ability to document in a way that would support the level of coding mattered to us because we believed  that many of us were being overcautious and undercoding in our paper records.


That is what we were looking for. That is pretty much what we got.

Then the world started to change, rather rapidly when you think about it. In 2009, HITECH and its incentive payments expanded the market and introduced requirements for “certified EHR technology.” More entities needed things tracked and counted for a long list of quality activities and “pay for performance” programs. Interoperability, which people thought was a “nice thing to have” in 2006 BE, was all of a sudden a “must have.”


Vendors responded by adapting their products to meet these new needs, and not surprisingly, it got messy at times (and expensive). Upgrades to add new “features” that would meet the latest requirements often broke the “old” new features added in the previous upgrade. Sometimes the upgrade process itself disrupted the work of the practice. With each “enhancement,” the code got bloated, the number of threads, pings, and server hits grew, and the EHR slowed down. It was no longer enough to have the information in the record. It had to be in the right place, in a “structured” field, all too often entered manually with a box click, so the physician slowed down along with the EHR.


It’s as if one bought a compact car to drive to work and take an occasional highway trip out of town but was now forced to use it for off-road driving and to tow large trailers into the mountains. It could be done, but very slowly and with frequent breakdowns. The Feds’ “hands off, let the marketplace take care of it” approach sounded very American and was politically easier than the alternative, but assumed that vendors would listen to their customers, and if not, that changing EHRs was as easy as switching from a compact car to a four-wheel  drive SUV. The difference, of course, is that the compact car has trade-in value that offsets some of the cost of the SUV, one doesn’t have to take driving lessons all over again to change vehicles, and you don’t have to pay thousands of dollars to move your belongings from the glove compartment and trunk of your old car to the new one.

Despite my cynicism, I do not think that all is lost. The collective discontent is getting louder. More practices and health care organizations are replacing or considering changing EHRs. The pressure is mounting on vendors to think less about their proprietary interests and more about the needs of their customers.


The ACP position paper has good recommendations for EHR system design. In a future post, I will discuss my “wish list” for the EHR of the near future. I invite you to share your ideas as well.



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Big data in health, an inevitable trend - mHealth

Big data in health, an inevitable trend - mHealth | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
"Big data is like teenagers with sex: everybody says they've done it, but they haven't. And if they do it, they do it badly." ...
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Building Effective Patient Education Programs

Building Effective Patient Education Programs | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

Patient education programs have been around for a long time, but typically these programs have been geared toward only the chronically ill and those that needed extensive management. In this era of the Patient-Centered Medical Home patients and insurers are looking more to physician practices to provide effective patient education in all aspects of their care. In fact, many insurance companies are actively measuring physicians' performance on quality metrics. Current accountable care models factor in patient utilization of emergency rooms, hospital visits, and prescriptions, and attribute that cost to the patient's primary-care doctor, which may also include specialties such as cardiology.

So what does this mean to your practice? With more accountability comes the need to manage patient populations more effectively to be able to hold the line on costs. If you are not doing a good job in actively engaging patients to "self manage" their own care, and utilizing lower-cost opportunities for managing your patients' care, then you may soon find yourself failing to achieve a targeted level of care and cost utilization, and that will cost you money.


Creating and implementing effective programs


The most effective education programs are those that are customized to each patient. But don't let that daunt you. You can define general care plans and then customize those on a patient-by-patient basis.


• First, determine what conditions to tackle. Get to know your patient population. What are the most complex and costly conditions that you manage? What conditions apply to the most patients across your practice? Hone in on those areas to begin with, set up and fine-tune a program or two, and then you can replicate successful programs across your entire patient base from there.


• Second, assess your patients' needs. Determine what actual resources and help is needed by your particular patients. Do not hesitate to poll your patients by asking them directly what their specific needs and challenges for self-management may be. If you make assumptions about your patients' needs, you may only meet the goals of a small part of your population, which can be counterproductive and result in poor compliance with the program. In addition to assessing needs, assess the challenges (such as lack of family support) and skills (Internet use, reading ability etc.) of your patients and build a program that can adequately meet them where they are coming from.


• Third, use what's available. Don't reinvent the wheel. There are lots of good materials, courses, and programs available. It's OK to adopt a program you like; just make sure to thoroughly review all of the material and adjust the sections, ideas, concepts, and so forth to fit with your specific patients' needs and your style of practicing medicine.


• Fourth, communicate effectively and set small targets. Let your patients know about these programs and educate them about what they are expected to do. Priorities should be clearly stated, mutually understood, and mutually agreed upon, and patients should be provided with information about what to do if they go "off the plan." That will help to keep them empowered and engaged in their own care, and keep them communicating effectively with you and the office when there is a problem. Keep the goals small and manageable to begin with and don't overload the patient with information. Tip sheets and goal targets should be the core of the program; then add in more information as the patient progresses. Keeping material simple, clear, and to the point will help with comprehension.


Setting one target per visit is a manageable way for patients to begin working a program. For example, set a new diabetes patient the goal of reducing his intake of sweets to three desserts per week, and provide a cheat sheet of desserts that are diabetes-friendly to choose from on the plan. At the next visit, you identify a new goal to add to the first one, and repeat. While it may take a while to turn a patient's health around, research confirms that small, incremental changes are much more likely to be lasting changes, so think in terms of a marathon rather than a sprint to the finish line.


Lastly, make the plans, goals, materials, and office staff highly available to the patient. Post the educational material on your site, mail follow-up materials to patients, place outbound follow-up calls and/or e-mails to patients to check on how they are doing between visits. These touch points matter and can be the difference between a successful program and good patient engagement or wasted effort and time.


And don't forget, as of January 2015, you can now bill a monthly, per patient code for chronic care coordination, CPT 99490. Just make sure to check the guidelines for this code to adhere to the description of services before you bill it.




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JAMA article calls for more effective tools to separate good mobile health apps from poor ones

JAMA article calls for more effective tools to separate good mobile health apps from poor ones | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

Few of the folks who champion digital health would make a case for apps as the be all end all solution to prevent the kind of complications that send healthcare...

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Survey: 33 percent of wearable tech users said fitness bands will impact enterprise | mobihealthnews

Survey: 33 percent of wearable tech users said fitness bands will impact enterprise | mobihealthnews | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
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Moolahonly's curator insight, April 24, 12:34 PM

Very interesting.

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Smartphone tapped as tech base for cancer diagnostic device

Smartphone tapped as tech base for cancer diagnostic device | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Today's smartphone may soon be tomorrow's mobile cancer detector given research on a high-resolution data imaging system that snaps onto a standard handset.
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Is There an App to Solve App Overload?

Is There an App to Solve App Overload? | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Like many physicians, Suzanne Clough, MD, struggled to meet her patients’ needs regarding their type 2 diabetes in a few 12-minute visits each year. But too often, patients’ concerns about day-to-day condition management weren’t fully addressed. Many were frustrated, and some didn’t follow her...
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Anna Niemeyer's curator insight, April 23, 3:29 PM

This is an important one!

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Mommy Bloggers: Engaging an Influential Voice in Healthcare

Mommy Bloggers: Engaging an Influential Voice in Healthcare | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Pediatricians and other family medicine providers should connect with mommy bloggers, a diverse group of educated, digitally connected, engaged parents.
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Microsoft Unveils 2015 Health Innovation Awards Winners

Microsoft Unveils 2015 Health Innovation Awards Winners | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Microsoft Health Innovation Awards showcases how innovative companies are using their technology to revolutionize medicine by bringing therapeutic...
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mHealth App Shows Promising Results In Identifying Breast Cancer Risk Factors

mHealth App Shows Promising Results In Identifying Breast Cancer Risk Factors | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
When it comes to successfully treating breast cancer, early detection is key. Even if a woman has a history of breast cancer in her family, there are factors
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In small study, ER patients prefer doctors consult via Google Glass, not phone | mobihealthnews

In small study, ER patients prefer doctors consult via Google Glass, not phone | mobihealthnews | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
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