Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English)
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Top 20 Technologies that Will Change our Lives: Next Up

Top 20 Technologies that Will Change our Lives: Next Up | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
By 2020, we’re expected to have approximately 20 billion devices globally. China is projected to have 5.1 billion and India, 1.5 billion. In just five years, we are looking at a world of 10 connected devices per household. What does this mean? Digital content is doubling every 18 months, and 90 [...]

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The True Vision of Big Data in Healthcare

The True Vision of Big Data in Healthcare | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

From the impact of wearable technology to the potential for boosting cancer research, there’s been a lot of buzz about big data in the healthcare space. However, the true vision of big data in healthcare lies not in individual data collection or disparate applications, but in the potential of combining healthcare data to create new resources for doctors.

New Data Sources

To conduct a recent study, researchers turned to data on social media to identify measures for stress by identifying tweets with hostile or negative language. They then turned the data into a color-coded map to predict the potential of heart disease in any given location. When researchers cross-checked their findings with a map created by traditional research, the maps were nearly identical. Based on the results, the researchers believe using external data sources to conduct big data research will be just as reliable and faster than traditional means.

Predictive Medicine

By combining disparate data sources, healthcare practitioners can also better identify patients who are at risk of developing a chronic disease and better suggest preventive tests and treatments. In addition to individual care, data can be used to identify potential disease outbreaks or hot spots, so the disease source can be quickly identified and contained.

Complete Patient Records

The healthcare industry has been notorious for its poor management of patient records. Individual health data is typically scattered across multiple files in different offices, and what is stored electronically is rarely shared between doctors. In addition, the majority of healthcare data is currently unstructured, making it difficult to sort through that data for patterns. By developing a structured system for tracking patient data, and combining data both from doctors and other sources, such as genetics and social media, healthcare professionals will have a complete profile of the patient allowing them to make better judgments and avoid costly mistakes.

Administrative Streamlining

Hospital administration consists of many moving parts. From ensuring machinery is operating properly to keeping doctors and nurses updated on the latest research and medical training. Even a basic BLS certification training takes extra time and coordination that keeps doctors away from treating patients. Companies that specialize in developing software that collects best practice information are turning to big data search engines to aggregate data, so they update best practice and patient outcome data in near real-time. By having this data readily available, doctors will be able to avoid unnecessary tests and streamline their own education.

The impact of big data on the healthcare industry is only beginning to be realized. While big data can and will be used to improve current processes, much of the benefit will come from new systems and technology that combine healthcare data with other sources to produce new insights.


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Massissilia AROUF's curator insight, October 26, 2016 3:25 AM
The True Vision of #BigData in #Healthcare
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Is Pharma Ready to Realize the Value of mHealth?

Is Pharma Ready to Realize the Value of mHealth? | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

mHealth experts at Partners' Connected Health Symposium say digital health tools could improve everything from clinical trials to drug efficacy. But progress is slow.When Apple launched its ResearchKit platform in 2015, healthcare providers and the pharma industry hailed the mHealth platform as a meaningful step toward better clinical trials.They’re starting to see that pay off.


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Can You Gamify Health? | Huffington Post

Can You Gamify Health? | Huffington Post | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Have you ever made a resolution to acquire a healthier lifestyle by changing your behaviour? Whether you wanted to be less stressed, cut out junk food, or stop smoking, you probably defined some simple rules and rewards to influence your behaviour and hopefully achieve that goal. When you applied those rules, you were in fact practicing “gamification”, the process of applying game mechanics to a real-life situation in order to generate a desired outcome. Unfortunately, you didn’t have the resources to turn those ideas into an exciting app.

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Study: Wearable Fitness Trackers May Do More Harm Than Good

Study: Wearable Fitness Trackers May Do More Harm Than Good | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
If you've been wearing a fitness tracker and have been disappointed in the results you've received, you're not alone. Results may not be as advertised.
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Pharma Guy's curator insight, September 28, 2016 9:24 AM

Alsop read: “Most Blood Pressure Monitoring Apps are Untested, Inaccurate and Even Bogus!”; http://sco.lt/6m9OFN

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Apple Watch Saves Man's Life

Apple Watch Saves Man's Life | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
A couple of people are giving the Apple Watch credit for saving their lives.

 

According to British tabloid The Sun a man’s life has been saved by his Apple Watch. The paper reports that Dennis Anselmo, a 62-year-old builder, felt “terrible” after taking lunch. Anselmo had a rest, and during that time looked at his Apple AAPL -1.14% Watch, checking his pulse. He discovered that it was well over twice what it should be, registering 210 beats per minute.

Anselmo then called for an ambulance, and at hospital was later told that had he gone home he may well have died. Instead the doctors were able to clear his arterial blockage and he’s now doing well. And Anselmo isn’t the first person to claim that their Apple Watch has saved their life either.


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“The Doctor Will Tweet You Now”

“The Doctor Will Tweet You Now” | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

The rise and availability of social media has affected almost every aspect of our daily lives. Is your kid’s school delayed because of snow? Better check the school’s Facebook page. Considering buying your first home? Your lender just tweeted a 2016 Homebuyers’ Report. Curious about how the president spends his days? Just look at his Instagram feed. Therefore, it shouldn’t come as a surprise the way people approach healthcare has changed, too. This blog has discussed digital strategy for healthcare practices, so here are a few social media-specific guidelines.

  • It’s all about the apps. About 20% of smartphone users utilize at least one health app on their phone. The most popular types relate to exercise, diet and weight. Though every healthcare facility doesn’t necessarily need an app, it’s important to have a strong mobile marketing focus. Many health providers have mobile patient access portals to keep pace with the growing digital world.
  • Putting the “me” in treatment. Social media has allowed patients to take a more active role in their healthcare. Whether it’s researching ailments, posting on forum, or joining support groups, more patients are becoming their own advocates when it comes to their health. Rather than relying solely on doctors to diagnose and determine the best course of treatment, patients are actively joining the discussion with diagnoses and treatment plans compiled from research and the advice or experience of others.
  • There’s no such thing as bad publicity… unless you’re in healthcare. Roughly 41% of people saidsocial media affects their choice of a doctor, hospital or medical facility. Not only are patients able to post their positive—or negative—experiences on their own social media platforms, but sites like HealthGrades.com, RateMDs.com and Vitals.com allow them to score providers on everything from ease of appointment setting to bedside demeanor and professionalism of office staff. It’s imperative that healthcare organizations pay close attention to the way they are represented to current and potential patients.
  • Seeing is believing. According to a think with Google research study, YouTube traffic to hospital sites has increased 119% year-over-year, and 30% of patients who watched an online video booked an appointment. Videos more effectively highlight the value of facilities and the human elements of the providers.
  • On call 24/7. Along with this streamlined form of patient and physician communication comes heightened expectations. According to those polled during a study by the Health Research Institute at PwC, 49% of people expect to hear from their physician within a few hours of requesting an appointment or engaging in a follow-up discussion via social media.

Social media outlets have become so omnipresent in our culture that they’ve changed the way healthcare professionals and facilities operate and approach patient relationships. With each new development in technology comes another way a healthcare practitioner must upgrade to engage—or risk losing a patient to one who does.


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This t-shirt lets you see inside the human body

This t-shirt lets you see inside the human body | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
The company behind it wants to make learning about human anatomy more fun.
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Health Literacy: The power of infographics for patient safety | HealthWorks Collective

Health Literacy: The power of infographics for patient safety | HealthWorks Collective | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
In 2008 The HELP Project of Bellevue Hospital released results of research on medication administration by caregivers of young children. They found that graphics instead of text heavy narratives resulted in improved compliance with instructions.
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How Psychology Is Adapting To The World Of Tech

How Psychology Is Adapting To The World Of Tech | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

With the increased use of online therapy and wellness-based mobile applications, the field of mental health is following in the path of physical health..


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How pharma can keep up as healthcare goes digital

How pharma can keep up as healthcare goes digital | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
One of the biggest ways the changing digital health landscape will affect the pharma industry is that pharma companies increasingly stand to lose control over their own stories, according to a new report from McKinsey & Company, who spoke to 20 thought leaders in various pharma-adjacent sectors.

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How pharma can win in a digital world

How pharma can win in a digital world | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
The digital revolution is well under way for pharma companies. We spoke with 20 leading executives to find out how they cope—and what they do to stay ahead. A McKinsey & Company article.
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MIT offshoot set to launch health app reviews

MIT offshoot set to launch health app reviews | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
A nonprofit institute, spun off from the healthcare entrepreneurship program at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will soon start producing consumer reviews of mobile apps and other digital health tools that have been vetted by Harvard University clinicians, the nonprofit's co-founder said.Set to launch in early December, these will consist of a consumer-focused list of the best apps, connected medical devices and technology-enabled services that are reviewed by Harvard physicians as well as by technical experts from MIT's Hacking Medicine Institute.
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GE Wants To Move All Your Health Data To The Cloud

GE Wants To Move All Your Health Data To The Cloud | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
The first step? Linking half a million radiology devices.

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The Internet of Things is transforming health care, but there's one huge risk

The Internet of Things is transforming health care, but there's one huge risk | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
From fitness trackers to medical devices that track specific conditions such as Huntington's disease or asthma, technology and healthcare companies are increasingly joining forces to utilize the Internet of Things to better monitor patients' health and help prevent diseases. The possibilities for both device makers and Big Pharma to collaborate with tech companies are vast, which is no surprise given that more than $3 trillion was spent on healthcare in the U.S. in 2014, and likely even more than that in 2015, according to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.
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Asthma tracking startup Propeller Health takes in $21.5 million to grow and go global

Asthma tracking startup Propeller Health takes in $21.5 million to grow and go global | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Imagine not being able to breathe and imagine that loss of breath coming out of nowhere. It's a frightening position to be in, but one company, Propeller..

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FDA approves Medtronic's 'artificial pancreas' for diabetes

FDA approves Medtronic's 'artificial pancreas' for diabetes | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Medtronic Plc won U.S. approval on Wednesday for an "artificial pancreas" that is the first device to automatically deliver the right dose of insulin to patients with type 1 diabetes, freeing them from continually monitoring insulin levels throughout each day.
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A Pill That Monitors Your Vital Signs

A Pill That Monitors Your Vital Signs | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Vital signs are key indicators of health. But tracking some of these signals, such as the body’s core temperature, can require invasive tactics—which is especially problematic for active or injured patients. Almost anyone, however, can swallow a pill.
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John Maughan's curator insight, June 10, 2016 9:27 AM
Inner Space 2 - we many not be able to miniaturize ourselves but we can do things today that were sci-fi in 1987.
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Augmedix nabs $17M to ‘rehumanize’ doctor/patient relations using Google Glass

Augmedix nabs $17M to ‘rehumanize’ doctor/patient relations using Google Glass | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Google Glass is no longer being marketed to consumers, but its enterprise business continues to pick up pace, and today one of the more promising companies..
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Slack for Healthcare: What Enterprise Collaboration and Messaging can do for the Future of… — Designing Healthcare

Slack for Healthcare: What Enterprise Collaboration and Messaging can do for the Future of... - Designing Healthcare - Medium
As a product designer in the healthcare space and father to a 13 month old who’s constantly sick, I’ve been thinking abo…
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This t-shirt lets you see inside the human body

This t-shirt lets you see inside the human body | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
The company behind it wants to make learning about human anatomy more fun.
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Microsoft’s Hololens Video will Change Anatomy Education

Microsoft’s Hololens Video will Change Anatomy Education | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
SOURCE July 2015 The Microsoft HoloLens has already been shown to work well with games like Minecraft but what about more real-world applications such as medicine.
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Silicon Valley Will See You Now

Silicon Valley Will See You Now | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
SOURCE December 2015 They’ve disrupted everything else. Now, high-tech innovators are taking aim at the biggest dinosaur of them all: America’s broken healthcare system.
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This is why a computer algorithm cannot ever fully replace a doctor's judgment

This is why a computer algorithm cannot ever fully replace a doctor's judgment | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
We need to keep having this conversation, and both the purists and the cowboys (and the patients) can have their say.
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The age of avatars is coming: iDAvatars CEO talks about IBM Watson, Intel collaborations

The age of avatars is coming: iDAvatars CEO talks about IBM Watson, Intel collaborations | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

There’s been a lot of hand wringing over robots andartificial intelligence that reflects our darkest fears ranging from concerns that they will lull us into dependence and then destroy us (ala Terminator) to learning and exploiting our weaknesses. Yet avatars don’t seem to attract that kind of negative publicity.

A USC study showed that people are inclined to trust avatars more than humans because they don’t view them as judgemental and find it easier to develop a rapport with them. Maybe avatars remind us of a game guide and we’re just inclined to relax and spill our guts around them.

 

One of the most interesting projects iDAvatars CEO and founder Norrie Daroga highlighted is its work with Intel on its Realsense 3D camera platform to help patients do certain medical tests remotely, such as evaluating bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease patients.


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The Language Ctr's curator insight, December 3, 2015 9:35 AM

Maybe avatars remind us of a game guide and we’re just inclined to relax and spill our guts around them!

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Patients Willing To Link EHRs To Social Media

Patients Willing To Link EHRs To Social Media | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

Utilizing social media could help drive healthcare quality improvement.

The rise of social media could provide an excellent source of data to help track healthcare consumer’s experiences, and apparently most patients would be ok with that according to the results of a study published by BMJ Quality and Safety.

Researchers asked adult ED patients if they would be willing to link their social media accounts to their EHR for medical research purposes, to which 71 percent of the patients agreed. The study examined Twitter as a potential source of data for capturing patient experience and patient-perceived quality of care in US hospitals.

More than 1,000 participants consented to share their social media and medical data over seven months. Analyzing content from as far back as 2009, the shared social media data consisted of nearly 1.4 million posts and tweets to Facebook and Twitter, comprising almost 12 million words.

The study was authored by Raina M. Merchant, MD, MSHP, director of the Social Media and Health Innovation Lab and an assistant professor of Emergency Medicine at Penn Medicine; Lyle Ungar, PhD, a professor of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania Kevin A. Padrez MD (also with the department of Emergency Medicine, the University of California, San Francisco); H. Andrew Schwartz PhD; Robert J Smith; Shawndra Hill PhD; Tadas Antanavicius; Dana M. Brown; Patrick Crutchley; and David A. Asch MD, MBA. It was funded through an Innovation Grant from the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics at the University of Pennsylvania.

According to the findings, patients who shared their social media were younger, tended to post at least once a day, were more likely to take themselves to the emergency room, and were more likely to hold private insurance than those who declined to share their data.

“We don’t often think of our social media content as data, but the language we use and the information we post may offer valuable insights into the relationship between our everyday lives and our health,”said Merchant. “Finding ways to effectively harness and mine that data could prove to be a valuable source of information about how and why patients communicate about their health. There is a rich potential to identify health trends both in the general public and at the individual level, create education campaigns and interventions, and much more. One of the unique aspects of this data is the ability to link social media data with validated information from a health record.”

The study authors suggest a database that merges social media with EMR data has the potential to provide significant insights into patients’ health and health outcomes.

“These findings suggests that social media is a promising avenue for exploring how patients conceptualize and communicate about their specific health issues,” said Ungar. “We see this as just the first of many studies to come examining the relationship between health and social media.”



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