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Rescooped by Celine Sportisse from 1- E-HEALTH by PHARMAGEEK - E SANTE par PHARMAGEEK
onto Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English)
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Top 20 Technologies that Will Change our Lives: Next Up

Top 20 Technologies that Will Change our Lives: Next Up | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
By 2020, we’re expected to have approximately 20 billion devices globally. China is projected to have 5.1 billion and India, 1.5 billion. In just five years, we are looking at a world of 10 connected devices per household. What does this mean? Digital content is doubling every 18 months, and 90 [...]

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Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English)
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The Importance of the Cloud and Data Security in Healthcare | HealthWorks Collective

The Importance of the Cloud and Data Security in Healthcare  | HealthWorks Collective | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
With effective network security, cloud computing can revolutionize the healthcare industry by making it easier for health professional to share critical data, giving patients greater control over their own health records and making the healthcare workplace more efficient.

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Diabetes: How technology has changed patients’ lives - mHealth

Diabetes: How technology has changed patients’ lives - mHealth | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
If technology has been helpful to patients of any pathology in particular that is diabetes. Before the invention of glucometers and mobile apps,...
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Opinion: Harnessing the Power of Big Data with Digital Health Partnerships

Opinion: Harnessing the Power of Big Data with Digital Health Partnerships | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
The following is a guest contributed post from Airstrip by Dr. Kevin Ward, Executive Director, University of Michigan Center for Integrative Research in
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Wearable Technology Report Shows Spending will Grow from $9 billion in 2014 to $218 Billion in 2019

Wearable Technology Report Shows Spending will Grow from $9 billion in 2014 to $218 Billion in 2019 | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
It's a win for wearables. New research suggests that global spending on wearable devices will surge from $9 billion in 2014 to reach $218 billion in
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Consumers Warm to Healthcare Wearables, But Have Concerns About Price and Privacy

Consumers Warm to Healthcare Wearables, But Have Concerns About Price and Privacy | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Wearable mobile technology has seen a steady growth trajectory, with corporations including Apple, Google, and Sony goosing the market for a slew of
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Researchers move ultrafast, low-cost DNA sequencing technology a step closer to reality

Researchers move ultrafast, low-cost DNA sequencing technology a step closer to reality | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
SOURCE November 24, 2014 (Nanowerk News) A team of scientists from Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute and IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center have developed a prototype DNA reader that could make whole genome profiling an everyday practice in medicine. "Our goal is to put cheap, simple and powerful DNA and protein diagnostic devices into every single doctor's office," said Stuart Lindsay, an ASU physics professor and director of Biodesign's Center for Single Molecule Biophysics. Such technology could help usher in the age of personalized medicine, where information from an individual's complete DNA and protein profiles could be used to design treatments specific to their individual makeup.Such game-changing technology is needed to make genome sequencing a reality. The current hurdle is to do so for less than $1,000, an amount for which insurance companies are more likely to provide reimbursement.In their latest research breakthrough, the team fashioned a tiny, DNA reading
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Two-thirds of Americans willing to share health data with researchers | mobihealthnews

Two-thirds of Americans willing to share health data with researchers | mobihealthnews | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
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AiCure tackling medication adherence with artificial intelligence

AiCure tackling medication adherence with artificial intelligence | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
One approach to improving medication adherence is the application of artificial intelligence, and New York-based startup AICure is gaining traction with its model, which involves using facial recognition and motion-sensing technologies through mobile devices.
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9 Healthcare Innovations Driven By Open Data - InformationWeek

9 Healthcare Innovations Driven By Open Data - InformationWeek | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Startups are using big, open data to power apps and tools designed to keep people healthier -- and we're not just talking about Watson.

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Teenagers to use their mobile phones to battle depression - Telegraph

Teenagers to use their mobile phones to battle depression - Telegraph | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Ministers are developing apps to help young people access therapy but campaigners have warned face-to-face treatment must still come first

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Can Big Data cure cancer?

Can Big Data cure cancer? | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

A tale of two twenty-something computer whizzes, a mountain of money from Google, and one of the oldest, most vexing problems of all time.


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The BMJ -Treating the patient and not the disease

The BMJ -Treating the patient and not the disease | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
It was the biggest turnout for many a year. In our small coastal town in the north west of England, 5000 of us stood together bare headed for an hour on a magnificently clear but cold November morning. The Salvation Army brass band was muted but played beautifully, and there was pomp and circumstance aplenty.

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4 social media trends within healthcare

4 social media trends within healthcare | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

This year it has been really interesting to watch how the healthcare sector has been successfully embracing social media marketing.

Every week more companies start to use social media as part of their marketing strategy and realising how a great asset it is to reach and connect with their audiences.

And that’s no surprise since a report by the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics tells us that in the U.K., Facebook is the fourth most popular source of health information and that doctors spend twice as much time consulting online resources than traditional print sources.

Social media is such a common strategy nowadays for the healthcare sector that we start to see emerging trends around this field, especially these four:

1. Educating patients

Social media is a great source for patients trying to find information about healthcare related issues.

So this provides healthcare companies with an amazing opportunity to deliver content to their audiences that informs them about all they need to know about their products, services, procedures, etc.

Such valuable content might be all these companies need in order to reach and engage their audience and also to increase brand awareness and expert reputation.

People start to trust them and coming back for more valuable information which also can be really valuable in gaining new clients and keeping the existing ones.

2. Live tweet chats

Many healthcare companies are providing live tweet chats with doctors where their patients (or potential patients) can ask them all questions related to their field, such as products, services or procedures.

This is a great opportunity to provide a personal and human touch on social media and also to show who are the “people behind the scenes” in a particular healthcare company.

It creates relationships and trust and can engage existing clients as well as gaining new ones.

3. Create discussion groups

Social media empowers clients, that is a fact. So besides searching and engaging in conversations taking place in Facebook or Twitter, many healthcare companies are creating their own social media discussion forums.

Whilst still being anonymous, people use them to ask questions, share stories, discuss relevant healthcare related topics and connect with the company.

This is a fantastic opportunity  to connect with their clients and potential clients, to listen to what they’re saying and to educate them in many healthcare related issues.

4. Apps

Healthcare providers are developing their own applications for their patients to use.

Being web or mobile apps, these are created with the goal of being useful and something that can help their patients on a daily basis.

Apps to track exercise and diet, symptoms triage, heart rate monitor, health tips, etc.

These apps are something their audience can use any time and will put the healthcare provider at top of their minds, making it a great way to connect with them.

 


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This Victoria’s Secret Sports Bra Can Hook Up With A Heart Rate Monitor

This Victoria’s Secret Sports Bra Can Hook Up With A Heart Rate Monitor | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
It was only a matter of time... fancy lingerie brand Victoria's Secret is now selling a sports bra for around $75 with built in electrodes that hook up to a..
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Mobile patient engagement startup Gamgee raises $4M

Mobile patient engagement startup Gamgee raises $4M | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
ilicon Valley startup Gamgee, a mobile health developer that seeks to improve patient engagement with voice-enabled technology, raised $4 million, according to a filing with the SEC.
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Medication adherence platform uses tablet, multiple reminders to condition seniors to take meds

Medication adherence platform uses tablet, multiple reminders to condition seniors to take meds | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Medication adherence business Medacheck uses computer, phone, email to condition users to take their medication.
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Healthcare Hashtags and Conversations | HealthWorks Collective

Healthcare Hashtags and Conversations | HealthWorks Collective | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Your guide to using hashtags to track and analyze conversations on Twitter.
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Medical robotics: Would you trust a robot with a scalpel?

Medical robotics: Would you trust a robot with a scalpel? | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
They can improve precision in surgery making it less invasive and speeding recovery; and in palliative care monitor vital signs and improve quality of life. The challenge now is to win over the patients
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Gartner shows a mixed market outlook for wearables sales

Gartner shows a mixed market outlook for wearables sales | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Gartner's report on wearables sees a decline in fitness tracking devices before a market rebound helped by insurance companies and employers providing them.
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3 Trends Shaping the Healthcare Marketing Industry

3 Trends Shaping the Healthcare Marketing Industry | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

While increasingly essential, online marketing can be a tricky area for healthcare professionals to excel in as the field continues to change and evolve along with technology and online trends. The most important thing is to stay connected with patients and reach out to potential patients by maximizing and honing online reach. This is no small task, and the best means and methods to accomplish it change with time.

Here are three of the major current trends in online marketing for healthcare professionals:

1) Embrace Social Media

Social media has been around for several years now, but usage among key demographics including older adults continues to grow, as does healthcare professionals’ involvement in social networking. It’s not enough to just have a Facebook anymore; to keep up with your competition, healthcare companies need to need to maintain a presence across a variety of networks, potentially including ones tailored for the healthcare industry.

Besides Twitter and Facebook, some social media sites you should consider developing a presence on include YouTube, LinkedIn, Four Square, and even physician-specialized social networking sites such as Sermo. Doctors and other healthcare professionals are also starting to build a presence on “fun” sites like Pinterest, Instagram, and Tumblr.

To get a glimpse of statistics regarding healthcare professional use of social media, check out Mayo Clinic’s Health Care Social Media List, which is “a compilation of health-related organizations actively using social networking sites and maintaining officially sponsored accounts.”

2) Invest in Brand Messaging

Another big trend in online healthcare marketing is brand messaging. Established brands are preferred by younger patients, and marketers are paying attention to this critical facet. Today’s patient has many choices when it comes to healthcare decisions, so building a positive online discussion about your brand is essential.

Mark Shipley, healthcare marketing expert and co-founder of Smith & Jones, recently explained in a statement, “Patients today are often referred to as healthcare consumers because they are as informed and self-directed in their care decisions as any retail shopper. To become relevant to this new breed of consumers, organizations will need to translate their brand messaging for smaller audiences at different stages of the decision process.”

Maintaining a stable image in the current industry environment of mergers and acquisitions is another reason why brand messaging is more important than ever. Furthermore, according to a recent blog post by Nurses Count, the top physicians, nurses, and administration leaders also want to be associated with the top brands in the industry.

So how do you market your brand? Brand journalism, also called story branding or corporate media, is one way brand messaging is accomplished. A form of content marketing, brand journalism focuses on real-life examples and human interest pieces. Healthcare professionals tell their own stories and distribute them through social media. According to the Smith & Jones white paperHealthcare Marketing’s Top Trends for 2014, this kind of corporate storytelling could replace the press release in the coming years.

3) Change Your View of ‘Content’

Content is still king when it comes to online marketing, but it might be time you start rethinking the definition of “content.” In addition to blog posts, articles, whitepapers, and other written content, image and video are becoming critical additions to your overall content package.

Accompanied by a short blurb or written post on social media, image and videos are growing in popularity for healthcare marketers. Young, busy consumers reading posts on their mobile devices appreciate short, shareable content, and images and videos meet this need perfectly.

A recent Pew Research Center study demonstrated that 47 percent of internet users share videos and photos they found online. Young people, and women are especially, are likely to share visual content they find online, according to the study.

“Pictures document life from a special angle, whether they relate to small moments, personal milestones, or larger news and events,” says report author Maeve Duggan. “Mobile connectivity has brought these visuals into countless lives in real-time. This all adds up to a new kind of collective digital scrapbook with fresh forms of storytelling and social bonding.”

Don’t miss out on this segment of the market: Get your visual content out there for consumers to share.

Stumped on how to create catchy content? According to Smith & Jones Healthcare Marketing’s Top Trends for 2014, the most shareable videos and photos that are likely to “go viral” are either funny, emotional, dramatic or surprising, or thought provoking. Videos should also be short (two minutes or less).

 


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A new dawn: The role of social media in diabetes education


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How the Wave of Personal Health Data Can Help Heal the World - iQ by Intel

How the Wave of Personal Health Data Can Help Heal the World - iQ by Intel | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
To tackle challenges of privacy and information overload, healthcare of the future will use patient data to optimize care. In October, Harvard University’
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Content Marketing Designed to Help Behavior Change

Content Marketing Designed to Help Behavior Change | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

Brands who want to get the most out of a content marketing program ought to embrace a user-centered approach to developing and delivering that content.


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Consumer health big data needs clinical validation

Consumer health big data needs clinical validation | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

With millions of Americans using fitness apps and tracking devices that count thousands of steps, keep tabs on weight and diet information, and record other consumer behavior information, there’s more data than ever to enhance a person’s health decisions. But researchers at the National Cancer Institute are hesitant to say this wearable tech revolution is clinically effective.

James McClain, program director of NCI’s Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch within the National Institutes of Health, said Thursday as part of a health IT panel that his institute is a major supporter of the growing infrastructure on connected health devices and applications, especially the data they generate. On a scientific level, though, he questioned, “Do we know if any of this works?”

“I would say anecdotally, we believe a lot of this works, and we have a lot of faith and confidence and belief,” McClain said. “But that doesn’t move the process forward as fast as it might.”

“It doesn’t take much to convince the consumer these days. Consumers believe, on a lot of these sorts of technologies and devices, that they will help them,” he said. “So there’s a lot of faith on the consumer side.” On the clinical side, however, it’s an entirely different story. “I think that’s why there’s some pause and some caution on the concept of patient-generated data,” he said. “How do we understand what it means?”

Rather, McClain said the focus should be on the “validation and evaluation of evidence generation,” and with the right funding, “that’s where a biomedical research institute like NIH can play a big role.”

“I’ve been pushing us to try to shift our focus in more of a clinical direction and less of a generalized public health assessment focus, cause we do, we support, we fund a lot of tremendous methodological work in those areas, and it’s probably time to turn it towards more of the individual user where we’re going to have this actionable data,” he said. That means setting up an IT and systems infrastructure that can process that data and make sense of it all. And in some cases, it could be as easy as inserting a clinical algorithm in the background of an app or device. It’s also scalable and replicable.

“A lot of that infrastructure, technology, systems, components we need to build, is identical when you look at cancer prevention or you look at heart disease, diabetes or any other chronic diseases we’re facing … any other health behavior,” McClain said. “What are the core components of analytic and IT systems we need to manage the data flows? We’re all talking about different sorts of data we want to potentially feed to clinical systems. But functionally, many of the components of that are sensible or usable and they are not something that have to be built a hundred times by a hundred different institutes or centers.”

The role NCI, other national health institutes and other federal health-focused agencies must take is complementary, building the systems to process that data — “Eighty to 100 Hz, just ridiculous data volumes, terabytes and terabytes of data,” McClain said — for their own purposes. Trying to standardize or change the consumer health industry will not help the cause.

“They’ll do greater things than we can do because they’re just going to have the venture capital investment and other sorts of things in that direction that drive innovation, and we don’t have that kind of money to put behind it,” he said.

But if NCI can capture more data, McClain said, he believes they might be able “to pick up the features and aspects of movement profiles, of sleep profiles, or other aspects of daily interaction that might actually be the signal rather than the noise.”

- See more at: http://fedscoop.com/nci-consumer-health-big-data-needs-clinical-validation/#sthash.lqZv5WBu.dpuf

With millions of Americans using fitness apps and tracking devices that count thousands of steps, keep tabs on weight and diet information, and record other consumer behavior information, there’s more data than ever to enhance a person’s health decisions. But researchers at the National Cancer Institute are hesitant to say this wearable tech revolution is clinically effective.

James McClain, program director of NCI’s Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch within the National Institutes of Health, said Thursday as part of a health IT panel that his institute is a major supporter of the growing infrastructure on connected health devices and applications, especially the data they generate. On a scientific level, though, he questioned, “Do we know if any of this works?”

“I would say anecdotally, we believe a lot of this works, and we have a lot of faith and confidence and belief,” McClain said. “But that doesn’t move the process forward as fast as it might.”

“It doesn’t take much to convince the consumer these days. Consumers believe, on a lot of these sorts of technologies and devices, that they will help them,” he said. “So there’s a lot of faith on the consumer side.” On the clinical side, however, it’s an entirely different story. “I think that’s why there’s some pause and some caution on the concept of patient-generated data,” he said. “How do we understand what it means?”

Rather, McClain said the focus should be on the “validation and evaluation of evidence generation,” and with the right funding, “that’s where a biomedical research institute like NIH can play a big role.”

“I’ve been pushing us to try to shift our focus in more of a clinical direction and less of a generalized public health assessment focus, cause we do, we support, we fund a lot of tremendous methodological work in those areas, and it’s probably time to turn it towards more of the individual user where we’re going to have this actionable data,” he said. That means setting up an IT and systems infrastructure that can process that data and make sense of it all. And in some cases, it could be as easy as inserting a clinical algorithm in the background of an app or device. It’s also scalable and replicable.

“A lot of that infrastructure, technology, systems, components we need to build, is identical when you look at cancer prevention or you look at heart disease, diabetes or any other chronic diseases we’re facing … any other health behavior,” McClain said. “What are the core components of analytic and IT systems we need to manage the data flows? We’re all talking about different sorts of data we want to potentially feed to clinical systems. But functionally, many of the components of that are sensible or usable and they are not something that have to be built a hundred times by a hundred different institutes or centers.”

The role NCI, other national health institutes and other federal health-focused agencies must take is complementary, building the systems to process that data — “Eighty to 100 Hz, just ridiculous data volumes, terabytes and terabytes of data,” McClain said — for their own purposes. Trying to standardize or change the consumer health industry will not help the cause.

“They’ll do greater things than we can do because they’re just going to have the venture capital investment and other sorts of things in that direction that drive innovation, and we don’t have that kind of money to put behind it,” he said.

But if NCI can capture more data, McClain said, he believes they might be able “to pick up the features and aspects of movement profiles, of sleep profiles, or other aspects of daily interaction that might actually be the signal rather than the noise.”

- See more at: http://fedscoop.com/nci-consumer-health-big-data-needs-clinical-validation/#sthash.lqZv5WBu.dpuf

With millions of Americans using fitness apps and tracking devices that count thousands of steps, keep tabs on weight and diet information, and record other consumer behavior information, there’s more data than ever to enhance a person’s health decisions. But researchers at the National Cancer Institute are hesitant to say this wearable tech revolution is clinically effective.

James McClain, program director of NCI’s Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch within the National Institutes of Health, said Thursday as part of a health IT panel that his institute is a major supporter of the growing infrastructure on connected health devices and applications, especially the data they generate. On a scientific level, though, he questioned, “Do we know if any of this works?”

“I would say anecdotally, we believe a lot of this works, and we have a lot of faith and confidence and belief,” McClain said. “But that doesn’t move the process forward as fast as it might.”

“It doesn’t take much to convince the consumer these days. Consumers believe, on a lot of these sorts of technologies and devices, that they will help them,” he said. “So there’s a lot of faith on the consumer side.” On the clinical side, however, it’s an entirely different story. “I think that’s why there’s some pause and some caution on the concept of patient-generated data,” he said. “How do we understand what it means?”

Rather, McClain said the focus should be on the “validation and evaluation of evidence generation,” and with the right funding, “that’s where a biomedical research institute like NIH can play a big role.”

“I’ve been pushing us to try to shift our focus in more of a clinical direction and less of a generalized public health assessment focus, cause we do, we support, we fund a lot of tremendous methodological work in those areas, and it’s probably time to turn it towards more of the individual user where we’re going to have this actionable data,” he said. That means setting up an IT and systems infrastructure that can process that data and make sense of it all. And in some cases, it could be as easy as inserting a clinical algorithm in the background of an app or device. It’s also scalable and replicable.

“A lot of that infrastructure, technology, systems, components we need to build, is identical when you look at cancer prevention or you look at heart disease, diabetes or any other chronic diseases we’re facing … any other health behavior,” McClain said. “What are the core components of analytic and IT systems we need to manage the data flows? We’re all talking about different sorts of data we want to potentially feed to clinical systems. But functionally, many of the components of that are sensible or usable and they are not something that have to be built a hundred times by a hundred different institutes or centers.”

The role NCI, other national health institutes and other federal health-focused agencies must take is complementary, building the systems to process that data — “Eighty to 100 Hz, just ridiculous data volumes, terabytes and terabytes of data,” McClain said — for their own purposes. Trying to standardize or change the consumer health industry will not help the cause.

“They’ll do greater things than we can do because they’re just going to have the venture capital investment and other sorts of things in that direction that drive innovation, and we don’t have that kind of money to put behind it,” he said.

But if NCI can capture more data, McClain said, he believes they might be able “to pick up the features and aspects of movement profiles, of sleep profiles, or other aspects of daily interaction that might actually be the signal rather than the noise.”
- See more at: http://fedscoop.com/nci-consumer-health-big-data-needs-clinical-validation/#sthash.lqZv5WBu.dpuf


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