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Samsung the pharmaceutical company, and the coming changes in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis

Samsung the pharmaceutical company, and the coming changes in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis | Health, eHealth, mHealth, Health & Social Media, Digital Health, Telehealth, Quantified Self, Wearable Tech | Scoop.it

In case you haven’t heard: Samsung is now a pharmaceutical company, or at least on the point of becoming one. Subsequent to its having invested at least $2b in biopharmaceuticals, the South Korean giant will be bringing a biosimilar version of Amgen’s Enbrel to market in 2016.

That’s right.

In 2016, a company best known for its consumer electronics and heavily invested in mobile health is going to start producing pharmaceuticals, and will apparently begin by bringing a treatment to market which will presumably make it a dominant force overnight in the two disease areas in which Enbrel has indications, namely moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis.

The implications of this for legacy pharmaceutical companies are wide-reaching and significant. Let’s consider a few of them (I anticipate updating this post over the next few months):

- Samsung now has more touch points across the health ecosystem than any other pharmaceutical company. ...

- Samsung’s total focus on customer experience and design makes it a credible champion of the participatory patient’s interests. ...

- Hundreds of millions of people carry this pharmaceutical company’s brand with them day and night. ...

- Consumers will think of Samsung as a consumer electronics company that makes pharmaceuticals. ...

- Samsung will be the first consumer technology company to enter the pharmaceutical marketplace, but it will not be the last.


If this thought doesn’t focus legacy pharmaceutical companies into throwing everything they have into reforming themselves as social business, nothing will. The survival of even the largest companies is far from certain when giants such as Samsung have set their sights upon entering the industry.


Samsung doesn’t think like a pharmaceutical company.


Pharmaceutical companies better start thinking like Samsung.


Via rob halkes, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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rob halkes's curator insight, May 14, 12:53 PM

Great blog by Andrew Spong, keen enough to see the great potential.. very much inspiring to all of pharma ;-) 

Must read, and still more: must think!

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The three critical factors wearable devices need to succeed

The three critical factors wearable devices need to succeed | Health, eHealth, mHealth, Health & Social Media, Digital Health, Telehealth, Quantified Self, Wearable Tech | Scoop.it

Wearables may be the tech du jour, but the next generation of devices and services needs to focus more on keeping users engaged in the long-term. These three factors, based on behavioral science, can help them do just that.

 

1. Habit formation. Sustained engagement depends on a device or service’s ability to help the user form and stick with new habits. Wearable devices have the potential, all too often unrealized, to make the process of habit formation more effective and efficient than ever before. The best engagement strategies for wearables move beyond just presenting data (steps, calories, stairs) and directly address the elements of the habit loop (cue, routine, reward), triggering the deep-seated psychological sequences that lead to the establishment of new habits.

 

2. Social motivation. To sustain engagement beyond the initial habit formation, a device or service must be able to motivate users effectively. Social connections are a particularly powerful source of motivation that can be leveraged in many creative ways. In addition to using social connections to influence behavior, social media and networking sites can be exploited to alter habits for positive outcomes.


3. Goal reinforcement. To achieve sustained engagement, a user also needs to experience a feeling of progress toward defined goals. Research shows that achieving several smaller goals provides the positive momentum necessary for achieving bigger goals. Wearable products and services that help people experience continuous progress can do so, for example, through real-time updates that are powered by big data and insights. Facilitating personal progress in this way leads to improved health, user satisfaction and long-term sustained engagement.


more at http://gigaom.com/2014/02/22/the-three-critical-factors-wearable-devices-need-to-succeed/



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Health-Care Apps That Doctors Use

Health-Care Apps That Doctors Use | Health, eHealth, mHealth, Health & Social Media, Digital Health, Telehealth, Quantified Self, Wearable Tech | Scoop.it

New health-care smartphone apps for doctors and patients help with everything from diagnostics and monitoring to revealing who isn't washing their hands.

 

Mobile apps for smartphones and tablets are changing the way doctors and patients approach health care. Many are designed for the doctors themselves, ranging from handy databases about drugs and diseases to sophisticated monitors that read a person's blood pressure, glucose levels or asthma symptoms. Others are for the patients—at their doctor's recommendation—to gather diagnostic data, for example, or simply to help coordinate care, giving patients an easy way to keep track of their conditions and treatments.

 

Doctors say many of the apps are useful time savers, and have the potential to make health care more efficient by speeding diagnosis, improving patient monitoring and reducing unnecessary visits to a physician or hospital. Still, the field has a way to go, doctors add, particularly when it comes to making good use of all the patient data being generated.

 

Here are some of the apps doctors are talking about most. Some are free; others cost several hundred dollars for a year's subscription. Those that combine an app and a wireless monitor cost from $80 to $200.

 

EPOCRATES One of the oldest and most established medical apps, Epocrates gives doctors basic information about drugs, the right dosing for adults and children, and warnings about harmful interactions. It has replaced many a copy of the Physician's Desk Reference.

 

 

UPTODATE This app provides reference material doctors can consult when making treatment decisions. David Bates, an internist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, says he has used it recently to look up treatment approaches for patients who have failed to respond to existing hypertension therapies, and for information on the drug combinations needed to treat a bacterial infection called H. pylori.

 

ISABEL Every doctor needs help reaching diagnoses. Here, doctors enter symptoms, and the app lists possible diagnoses as well as medications that could cause the symptoms.

 

ALIVECOR This portable heart monitor and app—one of the programs that opened Dr. Topol's eyes—runs on a patient's smartphone to produce electrocardiograms. Patients place their fingers over the monitor's sensors, which wirelessly communicate with the phone to produce the EKG.

 

 

RESOLUTIONMD Doctors can look at X-rays and other images on a smartphone or tablet when they use this app. Some doctors say the app is handy for viewing images as soon as they're available, no matter where the doctor happens to be.

 

ISCRUB This infection-control app collects and rapidly displays data on whether hospital staff are being scrupulous about washing their hands. Most hospitals have unofficial observers of whether doctors, nurses and other staff are following hand-hygiene guidelines. Many are not.

 

BREAST CANCER DIAGNOSIS GUIDE Using this app, breast-cancer patients enter and track details of their disease and treatment, from the size of the tumor to the presence or absence of estrogen receptors.

 

CLINICAM Increasingly, doctors are using their phones to take photos of a patient's condition—such as a rash or wound—and to upload the images to the patient's electronic medical record. One problem: That could violate health-care privacy laws if the doctor leaves the photo on his or her personal phone.

 

more at the original: http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303376904579137683810827104

     


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Samsung ehealth announcement: a health app vs Apple HealthBook?

Samsung ehealth announcement: a health app vs Apple HealthBook? | Health, eHealth, mHealth, Health & Social Media, Digital Health, Telehealth, Quantified Self, Wearable Tech | Scoop.it

Speculation is that the South Korean company could launch some health-related apps for its smartphones or a Gear Fit-type wearable device, or, asEngadget reports, the event could also be related to forthcoming sensors and components that can monitor vital stats.

 

Considering the timing of the event, which falls mere days before rival Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference, there are also rumors that the company would be launching something on the lines of the rumored Apple’s fitness tracking HealthBook app for iOS 8.

 

The app is reportedly capable of monitoring heart rate, blood pressure, weight, oxygen saturation, respiratory rate, and blood sugar, as well as track your bloodwork, hydration, physical activity, nutrition, and sleep. Although there are apps out there in the market that provide some of these features, HealthBook is expected to combine them all in a single mobile interface.


Via Ignacio Fernández Alberti
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Successful Cases of Mobile Technology in Medical Industry

The medical industry is quickly adopting mobile technology as a means of connecting lay users with medical professionals. Increasingly, smartphone and tablet users are speaking to their doctors, scheduling medical appointments, and even receiving complex diagnoses via mHealth platforms. 

mHealth makes it possible for consumers to receive personalized medical care that may otherwise be unavailable to these individuals. 

In this article you can find cases that include some of the most successful mHealth developments to date. 


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Ricardo Rocha's curator insight, January 11, 10:20 AM

Cases interessantes, alguns ainda longe de serem aplicados em nosso país. #chegaremoslá #interoperabilidade #saudenaveia