Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English)
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Diabetes management app to begin pilot at UMass Medical School | mobihealthnews

Diabetes management app to begin pilot at UMass Medical School | mobihealthnews | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
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Acceptance Factors of Mobile Apps for Diabetes by Patients Aged 50 or Older: A Qualitative Study

Acceptance Factors of Mobile Apps for Diabetes by Patients Aged 50 or Older: A Qualitative Study | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
A lack of additional benefits and ease of use emerged as the key factors for the acceptance of diabetes apps among patients aged 50 or older

Via Anna Niemeyer, Olivier Delannoy
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How mHealth tech is changing diabetes treatment

How mHealth tech is changing diabetes treatment | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Today's mobile apps are helping diabetics aggregate blood sugar and nutritional data from multiple platforms and devices and logging data into central portals accessible anywhere, according to Steve Robinson, general manager of the Cloud Platform Services Division for IBM.
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Mobile Applications for Diabetes Self-Management: Status and Potential

Mobile Applications for Diabetes Self-Management: Status and Potential | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Vol. 7, Issue 1 Jan. 2013.

El-Gayar, Timsina and Nawar.


ABSTRACT

Background:
Advancements in smartphone technology coupled with the proliferation of data connectivity has resulted in increased interest and unprecedented growth in mobile applications for diabetes self-management. The objective of this article is to determine, in a systematic review, whether diabetes applications have been helping patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes self-manage their condition and to identify issues necessary for large-scale adoption of such interventions.
Methods:
The review covers commercial applications available on the Apple App Store (as a representative of commercially available applications) and articles published in relevant databases covering a period fromJanuary 1995 to August 2012. The review included all applications supporting any diabetes self-management task where the patient is the primary actor.
Results:
Available applications support self-management tasks such as physical exercise, insulin dosage or medication, blood glucose testing, and diet. Other support tasks considered include decision support, notification/alert, tagging of input data, and integration with social media. The review points to the potential for mobile applications to have a positive impact on diabetes self-management. Analysis indicates that application usage is associated with improved attitudes favorable to diabetes self-management. Limitations of the applications include lack of personalized feedback; usability issues, particularly the ease of data entry; and integration with patients and electronic health records.
Conclusions:
Research into the adoption and use of user-centered and sociotechnical design principles is needed to improve usability, perceived usefulness, and, ultimately, adoption of the technology. Proliferation and efficacy of interventions involving mobile applications will benefit from a holistic approach that takes into account patients’ expectations and providers’ needs.


J Diabetes Sci Technol 2013;7(1):247–262    


Via rob halkes, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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rob halkes's curator insight, August 29, 2014 10:29 AM

There is good perspective to mobile health (ehealth) applications to self management in diabetes. However, as this research review suggests: we need to know more about use and socio technological influences. As I repeat myself: ehealth mhealth is NOT about technology: it is about implementation. Let's go for that!

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Will #Pharma Morph Into a Consumer-focused mHealth App Developer Business?

Will #Pharma Morph Into a Consumer-focused mHealth App Developer Business? | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

Apps are moving much closer to delivering real therapeutic benefit, as I wrote last month on Forbes. But life science venture capital  investors of any stripe – financial or corporate -- are reluctant to invest in app developers. 

 

Then, earlier this month, I noticed that a life sciences venture capitalist I know, Simon Meier, a corporate VC from Roche Venture Fund, had just invested in a $4.8 million round raised by mySugr, an Austrian app developer that has produced some popular apps to help both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics manage their disease.

 

mySugr is a pure direct-to-consumer business that exists to make it easier to live with diabetes, whether type 1 or type 2. As reported on MobiHealthNews, “MySugr[’s]… flagship [app]… Diabetes Logbook … includes logging, graphing, analysis, ‘exciting challenges,’ ‘smile-inducing feedback,’ and Apple AAPL -2.61% Health integration. If users sign up for a month-to-month or annual subscription, pro [premium] features include additional challenges, automatic blood glucose logging from connected devices, reminders, and more report formats. Its Logbook app is registered as a class 1 device with the FDA [U.S. Food & Drug Administration] and has similar status inEurope.”

 

What a different risk profile this presents compared to a diabetes drug! No decade-long product development. No regulatory risk. No costly clinical trials. And no massive and expensive sales force. Sounds like a VC’s dream. Except for the tradeoff: the app has to reach millions of users and then convince a significant fraction of them to pay for the premium features while staying ahead of all the other diabetes apps in an arena with much lower barriers to entry than a drug would face.

 

The pharma business model – charging high prices at high margins for products whose development takes a decade or more – is beginning to seem increasingly threatened by lower cost competitors (think generics and biosimilars) and reimbursement challenges (look at the recent scrap over the price of hepatitis C drugs). Making exploratory investments in app companies may represent a way to establish a beachhead in a pharma-lite (if not completely pharma-free) future.

 

It is unwise to push this thesis too far. Being a participant in a small venture round of less than five million dollars is a far cry from giving up one’s business model. And it was the venture fund, which operates independently from the strategy of the parent company, that made the investment. Still, the same way that Apple has migrated from being “just” a hardware and software company to being a “digital data and online ecosystem” company, early forays like corporate VC investments in the digital world reflect a similar impulse to add a greater consumer focus within the pharma industry.

 

So watch out. This small step into consumer-friendly apps might evolve into a giant leap into an entirely new business.

 

 


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Pharma Guy's curator insight, March 26, 2015 7:28 AM


This may be where "patient-centricity" and investment in "innovation" lead the drug industry.

Sarah Palmer's curator insight, March 26, 2015 1:06 PM

mySugr - great example of using technology to address healthcare issues #collaborate #innovate

Alexandre Gultzgoff's curator insight, March 30, 2015 4:17 AM

watch out. health apps will soon deliver benefits for patients... and pharmas.

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Mayo Clinic, Gentag Partner to Develop Wearable Biosensors for Obesity and Diabetes

Mayo Clinic, Gentag Partner to Develop Wearable Biosensors for Obesity and Diabetes | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Mayo Clinic and Gentag, Inc. has signed a joint IP agreement to develop the next generation of wearable biosensors designed to fight obesity and diabetes.

Via Xavier SEDES, Jerome Leleu
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Richard Platt's curator insight, March 15, 2015 6:07 PM
More wearable technology for the healthcare domain
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Novo taps behavioural change for diabetes programme’s re-launch - PMLiVE

Novo taps behavioural change for diabetes programme’s re-launch - PMLiVE | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it
Adds health coach function to Cornerstones4Care
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Google testing contact lens that can monitor glucose levels

Google testing contact lens that can monitor glucose levels | Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English) | Scoop.it

 

Finger pricks and careful eating are an important part of the daily routine for most people with diabetes. While automated glucose meters are a growing option, they can still create discomfort and other inconveniences.

 

 

Google wants to go in a totally different direction with a project announced today:smart contact lenses that can detect glucose levels via the wearer’s tears and alert them when levels dip or rise.

 

 

This isn’t the first smart contact lens, and several options already exist for people interested in monitoring glaucoma. But Babak Parviz, who also leads the Google Glass team, is a smart contact pioneer and Google which is a secretive division of Google dedicated to difficult, future-looking projects, has a reputation for ably pursuing projects like this.

 

 

The lens works via a small wireless chip and glucose sensor embedded between two pieces of soft material. The current prototype puts out a reading once a second. Google is also interested in integrating an LED light, which could light up to alert the wearer of dangerous glucose levels.

 

 

The lab is now looking for parters to help bring the lens to market. It would also like to develop an app that would help wearers read and manage the data the lens takes in.

 

The lens could help people with diabetes monitor their daily health and recognize dangerous situations.

 

more at http://gigaom.com/2014/01/16/google-testing-contact-lens-that-can-monitor-glucose-levels/

 


Via nrip
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Beth Faulkner's curator insight, January 22, 2014 7:27 AM

Google's smart contact lens could ease the pain of diabetes monitoring.