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The sea is full of life, but not quite that full | Deep Sea News

The sea is full of life, but not quite that full | Deep Sea News | Soggy Science | Scoop.it
A couple weeks ago this photo was going viral with the headline "A Single Drop of Seawater, Magnified 25 Times": This is not a single drop of seawater,
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SeaWorld fined for improperly protecting employees from killer whales

SeaWorld fined for improperly protecting employees from killer whales | Soggy Science | Scoop.it
The &u0024;25,770 penalty comes five years after a trainer died during an orca show.
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A #Sharkweek Tribute: The 12 Best Shark Pictures

A #Sharkweek Tribute: The 12 Best Shark Pictures | Soggy Science | Scoop.it
Here's the 12 best Shark Pictures on the internet. See sharks in different sizes and shapes. This is DIVE.in's #SharkWeek tribute to sharks. Pure shark love
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Humpback highway is getting crowded: Record number of whales expected for annual migration

Humpback highway is getting crowded: Record number of whales expected for annual migration | Soggy Science | Scoop.it
THE humpback highway is becoming more congested, with a record number of whales expected on their annual migration.
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Goliath Grouper Bites Diver Over Bad Sign Language...

Goliath Grouper Bites Diver Over Bad Sign Language... | Soggy Science | Scoop.it
Goliath Grouper are very smart fish… So much so that they might even be able to partially read sign language… Yep. And as this diver found out the hard way, when you use aggressive sign language in front of a Goliath Grouper, they do what they were built to do… Act aggressive. So aggressive that
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Factory trawler returns to port after catching dolphins

Factory trawler returns to port after catching dolphins | Soggy Science | Scoop.it
The factory trawler Geelong Star is again forced to stop fishing because it has caught and killed dolphins.
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Great white shark tracked off coast

Great white shark tracked off coast | Soggy Science | Scoop.it
FENWICK ISLAND: Research group Osearch tracks great white shark nicknamed "Mary Lee" 45 miles southeast of Fenwick Island.
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US Navy to assist US-flagged ships through Strait of Hormuz - BBC News

US Navy to assist US-flagged ships through Strait of Hormuz - BBC News | Soggy Science | Scoop.it
US Navy ships are to accompany US-flagged vessels through the Strait of Hormuz, after Iran detained a Danish cargo ship in the area.
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Is this the world’s scariest 'swimming pool'?

Is this the world’s scariest 'swimming pool'? | Soggy Science | Scoop.it
Named FloWave, the pool at Edinburgh University creates waves that are nine-stories high and generates currents four times faster than an Olympic swimmer.
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Bioceramics obtained for implants from shark teeth

Researchers have managed to obtain bioceramics from shark teeth, which have already tested applications in the regeneration of bone tissue, particularly in the fields of traumatology and odontology. Given the degree of innovation and the positive results obtained after preliminary trials, the European patent is currently been applied for to protect this finding.
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A little conservation goes a long way in Australia's Great Barrier Reef

A little conservation goes a long way in Australia's Great Barrier Reef | Soggy Science | Scoop.it
Experts have reported some good news about their long-running efforts to protect fish in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef: A ban on fishing in one large portion of the reef has helped fish throughout the habitat.
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Biggest Great White Shark Caught, Released

Biggest Great White Shark Caught, Released | Soggy Science | Scoop.it

A monster male named Apache hauled up off Mexico is the biggest great white shark yet caught, an expedition team reports.

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Manta Ray Rescue Mission

Manta Ray Rescue Mission | Soggy Science | Scoop.it
Jane Headley and her husband save an entangled Manta Ray on their scuba trip in the Philippines.
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Baby Shark Season Begins Off Southern California Coast

Baby Shark Season Begins Off Southern California Coast | Soggy Science | Scoop.it
Due to the warmer waters brought on by this year’s El Niño, Baby Shark Season has officially begun off the Southern California Coast and, according to the biology experts at Cal State University, Long Beach’s Shark Lab, this means that more sharks will likely be sighted closer to shore as their pups are born.
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Among Giants: A Life with Whales | California Academy of Sciences

Among Giants: A Life with Whales | California Academy of Sciences | Soggy Science | Scoop.it
Immerse yourself inside images by Nat Geo Photographer Flip Nicklin as we dive into the oceans to visit whales.
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O.C. sightings of great white sharks have gone up, and why that's a good thing

O.C. sightings of great white sharks have gone up, and why that's a good thing | Soggy Science | Scoop.it
For decades, humans have terrorized great white sharks, killing them for sport, killing them in pursuit of other sea creatures, killing them out of fear.Thursday, shark experts happily reported that a sighting of two juvenile great whites off the coast of Seal Beach could be evidence that the great white population is coming back. Since March 1, people have reported 11 sightings of sharks -- eight were reported to be great whites -- from San Onofre to Seal Beach.Those increased numbers of great whites have several contributing factors. In 1994, the state made commercial and recreational great white shark fishing illegal. In the same year, near-shore gill nets were banned. In 2013, great whites were placed on California’s Endangered Species List.“The recovery of the great white is one of California’s greatest conservation stories,” said Chris Lowe, a Marine Biology professor at Cal State Long Beach and director of the Shark Lab.Shark watchers joined in Lowe’s excitement Thursday.“It’s good news,” said Sandy Trautwein, the curator of Fish and Invertebrates at the Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific. “It may mean that the protections we put in place are finally working. Sharks keep our local marine eco-systems healthy.”Of course, the presence of an increased population of great white sharks close to the beach might make surfers and beach frolickers uneasy. In Hawaii, a woman was killed by a shark Wednesday.But, an expert said, an encounter with a shark is rare -- especially in the waters off Orange County where juvenile great whites live. Great whites are mysterious creatures with life spans between 30 and 70 years. They mature and mate between the ages of 15 and 20.“I would be more concerned about stepping on a broken bottle at the beach than having an encounter with a shark from Point Conception to San Diego,” said Ralph Collier, president of the Shark Research Committee and director of the Global Shark Attack File.It has taken two decades, experts said, for great whites to have enough babies to grow the population. The Pacific Ocean off the coast of Southern California is the perfect nursery for great whites. The water temperatures are warm and the population of grunion, a small, silver fish, is high.Young great whites feed without help from their mothers. So they go where the grunion are. Young great whites from five to six feet long don’t usually attack people.“They avoid things that are larger than them,” Collier said.They haven’t been chasing the sea lions, which are coming to Orange County beaches in greater numbers, because the sea lions are gaunt and sickly, Collier said.“The sea lions are skeletons, and the sharks aren’t eating them,” Collier said.Mature great whites typically move into deeper water where they pursue full-size sea lions, seals, otters, sea turtles and other whales.Great whites have been demonized, Collier said, since the first reported shark attack in 458 B.C. The movie “Jaws,” a summer blockbuster from 1975, created a frenzy of shark fear and interest.“People reacted to the film with fear and without thinking,” Collier said. “But shark research went up. Everything in life has a double edge.”
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Nepal’s Dangerous Dams - The New Yorker

Nepal’s Dangerous Dams - The New Yorker | Soggy Science | Scoop.it
More than four hundred dams are planned or are under construction in steep Himalayan valleys in China, India, Pakistan, and Bhutan, in one of the biggest waves of dam construction the world has ever seen.
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Okeanos Explorer | Expeditions | Exploring Puerto Rico’s Seamounts, Trenches, and Troughs | Dive Highlights

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Design Night: Deep Dive - YouTube

While hundreds have ventured into space, only three people have reached the lowest point on the planet, the ocean floor, 7 miles below the surface. Oceanic i...
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Lazy Sunfish isn’t Quite so Lazy After All

Lazy Sunfish isn’t Quite so Lazy After All | Soggy Science | Scoop.it
At first glance, the sunfish appears to spends its life sunbathing leisurely near the surface. New research, however, paints the sunfish in a different light.
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Two Navy SEAL Operators Drown During Underwater Training | SOFREP

Two Navy SEAL Operators Drown During Underwater Training | SOFREP | Soggy Science | Scoop.it
Two men from SEAL Team 2, SO1 Seth Cody Lewis and SO1 Brett Allen Marihugh, were found dead at the bottom of the pool they were training in.
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Carbon cycle: New factors impacting the fate of sinking carbon

Carbon cycle: New factors impacting the fate of sinking carbon | Soggy Science | Scoop.it
Scientists have discovered a surprising new short-circuit to the biological pump. They found that sinking particles of stressed and dying phytoplankton release chemicals that have a steroid-like effect on marine bacteria feeding on the particles. The chemicals juice up the bacteria's metabolism causing them to more rapidly convert organic carbon in the particles back into CO2 before they can sink to the deep ocean.
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Hawaiian Canoe Hōkūleʻa Sets Sail for Sydney Guided by Ancient Navigation

Hawaiian Canoe Hōkūleʻa Sets Sail for Sydney Guided by Ancient Navigation | Soggy Science | Scoop.it

Hawaii's iconic voyaging canoe ventures outside of the Pacific Ocean for the first time as the Worldwide Voyage continues on to new horizons.

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