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Amber Case: We are all cyborgs now

Technology is evolving us, says Amber Case, as we become a screen-staring, button-clicking new version of homo sapiens. We now rely on "external brains" (cell phones and computers) to communicate, remember, even live out secondary lives.


Via axelletess
Jane Franken's insight:

This talk takes an anthropological view of humans and technology which lends context to and directly supports ideas specific to the future of software development.  Case describes the way emerging technology is freely traversing the barrier between physical and mental, the implications of which will surely impact heavily on software development.

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Lucile Debethune's curator insight, April 21, 7:28 AM

Les smartphone sont ils une extension de notre cerveau ou une partie de notre être étendu ? Sommes nous déjà des Cyborg ? 

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Software Development in the Next Decade
A look at the likely evolution of software development over the next five to ten years
Curated by Jane Franken
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John Underkoffler: Pointing to the future of UI | Video on TED.com

Minority Report science adviser and inventor John Underkoffler demos g-speak -- the real-life version of the film's eye-popping, tai chi-meets-cyberspace computer interface. Is this how tomorrow's computers will be controlled?
Jane Franken's insight:

A great video demonstrating some new ways of thinking about user interface design which tap into the trend towards creating a highly intuitive user experience in software.  Importantly it addresses the issue of the human preference towards operating in 3D space, suggesting that perhaps a truly intuitive experience is really only possible for humans if we release the computer (or at least the experience of using it) from its two dimensional confines into our three dimensional world.

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Rescooped by Jane Franken from My Favorite TED Talks
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Amber Case: We are all cyborgs now

Technology is evolving us, says Amber Case, as we become a screen-staring, button-clicking new version of homo sapiens. We now rely on "external brains" (cell phones and computers) to communicate, remember, even live out secondary lives.


Via axelletess
Jane Franken's insight:

This talk takes an anthropological view of humans and technology which lends context to and directly supports ideas specific to the future of software development.  Case describes the way emerging technology is freely traversing the barrier between physical and mental, the implications of which will surely impact heavily on software development.

more...
Lucile Debethune's curator insight, April 21, 7:28 AM

Les smartphone sont ils une extension de notre cerveau ou une partie de notre être étendu ? Sommes nous déjà des Cyborg ? 

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Microsoft's Concept of How 2019 Will Look Like - Official Video

What do you think the world will look like in 2019? Predicting future trends is usually done poorly by Analysts so company's seem to want to give consumer a ...
Jane Franken's insight:

An official Microsoft video that is light on the technical details and heavy on the idealism, however despite the telltale signs of Microsoft's marketing department it is a feasible look at where mobile computing in particular might be headed.  Considering Microsoft's power and marketshare today, it is safe to assume they will continue to influence the industry at large.  This video is a good companion to the multitude of more detailed sources quoting mobile applications and complex integration as some key factors that will affect software development over the next decade.  It also shows elements of both professional and consumer applications for the hypothetical technology and is highly visual, adding a more tangible projection into the future.

 

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10 skills developers will need in the next five years | TechRepublic

10 skills developers will need in the next five years | TechRepublic | Software Development in the Next Decade | Scoop.it
If you’re a developer looking to get ahead in your field (or in some cases, to simply stay employed), this is not a good time to be complacent.
Jane Franken's insight:

This succinct article makes some clear points that support much of what I've researched so far.  Once again, the emphasis is placed squarely on programming: the need to know a prominent language thoroughly, while also being able to encompass increasingly disparate functionality and be very familiar with associated frameworks and libraries.  Along with the expected mentions of web and mobile applications and technologies, there is an excellent point raised in regards to soft skills.  The increasingly pervasive nature of software in our society is requiring developers to have the soft skills needed to effectively integrate with previously disparate teams of professionals.  This is an area which has been perhaps somewhat overlooked; it is now clearly going to be a necessity.

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The Status and Future of Software Development

The Status and Future of Software Development | Software Development in the Next Decade | Scoop.it
Throughout the past several decades we’ve seen quite an evolution in the field we now refer to as software development, as you’d expect.
Jane Franken's insight:

This article focuses on both the pitfalls and the potential of software development trends.  Key difficulties raised include the sheer complexity and volume of powerful technology at hand, leading to a drop in the consistency and integration of software as developers struggle to find a clear focus; the related trend towards jumping on board new or emerging technologies, such as cloud storage and mobile application support, without fully understanding the implications; and the proliferation of new programming languages, creating a defecit of professionals with strong core skills as well as making it increasingly difficult to write secure code.

The latter part of the article points out the positive potential of these pitfalls; the continued and increasing scale of software development is serving to maintain a thriving and evolving industry, requiring skilled professionals and driving innovation.  Strong programming skills are raised as a likely necessity among developers going forward.

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CW500: The future of software development

CW500: The future of software development | Software Development in the Next Decade | Scoop.it
Read a summary of the discussion at this CW500 event, watch video interviews with the speakers, and download a copy of their presentation slides.
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Harald Haas: Wireless data from every light bulb | Video on TED.com

Harald Haas: Wireless data from every light bulb | Video on TED.com | Software Development in the Next Decade | Scoop.it
What if every light bulb in the world could also transmit data? At TEDGlobal, Harald Haas demonstrates, for the first time, a device that could do exactly that.
Jane Franken's insight:

This brilliant presentation relates broadly rather than specifically to the future of software development.  Harald Haas presents his concept of using existing and prevalent LED lightbulb infrastructure to transmit data wirelessly, supported by a fully functional implementation in a desk lamp.  The trend towards increasingly streamlined integration in both hardware and software is already proving problematic for current data systems.  If current ambitions are to be fufilled and exceeded, it is likely that new ways of managing data will become necessary.  Haas' idea is significant for being one of the most efficient and ingenious systems I have come across, less due to the specific concept of using LED technology and more because of what it realises on a more fundamental level; that the key to innovation often lies in looking at existing technology in a new way.

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Mike Matas: A next-generation digital book | Video on TED.com

Software developer Mike Matas demos the first full-length interactive book for the iPad -- with clever, swipeable video and graphics and some very cool data visualizations to play with.
Jane Franken's insight:

An extremely interesting video that I have included, in part, to be considered alongside Microsoft's 2019 video.  This technology is happening now, but to imagine the evolution of Mike Matas' interactive, gesture-based and highly integrated eBook software might easily lead to ideas similar to Microsoft's 2019 vision.  

This video also illustrates the leaps being made currently in mobile software development and the trend towards the integration of traditionally disparate technologies and communication media.  It is a clear insight into the 'new generation' of software development, with the emphasis seemingly shifting to favour smaller companies staffed by innovative, talented and multiskilled developers.

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10 skills for developers to focus on in 2013 | TechRepublic

10 skills for developers to focus on in 2013 | TechRepublic | Software Development in the Next Decade | Scoop.it
Development trends that began to emerge in 2012 are picking up steam. Here’s a look at the must-know technologies for the year ahead.
Jane Franken's insight:

Much is inevitably inferred about the longer-term future of software development in this article.  The author notes the unexpectedly rapid growth of mobile development and how it is driving internet applications forward.  With mobile and web development high on the list here, along with a note on the increasing significance of dynamic languages, much of what I've read is again reinforced.  There is also an excellent point which I've not seen mentioned specifically; the great importance of creating a good user experience in such a crowded, oversaturated, cross-platform environment.  As the author notes, "If your user experience is poor, do not expect much business."

Overall the main message here echoes what appears to be the popular consensus on software's immediate and near future; developers won't get away with being mediocre much longer.  There is a focus on the need for flexibility, learning and diversification en large and the onus is landing on the individual software developer to maintain and expand their skills at a perhaps unprecedented rate.

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Can Software Developers Keep Up? : Opinion: AMD, Intel, And Nvidia In The Next Ten Years

Can Software Developers Keep Up? : Opinion: AMD, Intel, And Nvidia In The Next Ten Years | Software Development in the Next Decade | Scoop.it
What follows is a very long-winded way of saying: the video game market is large enough and profitable enough to support the development of titles with Pixar-level budgets of $150-175M . Seriously. It’ll be very long-winded.
Jane Franken's insight:

A look at the current state and future of graphics hardware and the implications this has for the software development industry, namely for games developers.  The most interesting point made here in regards to the next ten years is the large amount of potential remaining in consumer graphics hardware and software.  The fact that both are still far from plateauing means there is much to look forward to yet in regards to GPUs, maintaining and furthering a market in which software developers can continue to evolve along with the technology.  The point is made that a similar boom occurred with audio technology, with soundcard hardware and associated software generating hype akin to the current GPU/graphics market until all real potential was eventually exhausted; it is argued that the industry around graphics may meet the same fate, but that the plateau lies far further in the future than it did for sound, ensuring that both hardware manufacturers and software developers have many good years ahead of them in regards to GPU capabilities and technology.  The emergence of "Triple A" game developers operating on budgets comparable to Hollywood is used to demonstrate how confident the industry is looking towards the next few years.

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The Future of Software Development

The Future of Software Development | Software Development in the Next Decade | Scoop.it
In 1975, Frederick Brooks wrote a classic book on software project management called
The Mythical Man-Month.
In the book, he famously argued that adding more people to a development project will hinder rather than help to get things done faster.
Jane Franken's insight:

Although it presents a fairly brief summary of its topic, this piece provides clear and insightful context for discussion by reviewing what has lead to the present state of software development before moving on to make some excellent points about the future, namely: the fall of the Waterfall model and rise of agile development methods; the increasing emphasis placed on having strong programming skills as programming languages and libraries become more evolved and refined than ever before; and most interestingly, the observation that these trends are reminiscent of the attitude of the early days of software development with small, talented and dedicated teams of developers turning out software to be used by millions of people.

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Software development - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Software development (also known as application development, software design, designing software, software application development, enterprise application development, or platform development)[1] is the development of a software product. The term "software development" may be used to refer to the activity of computer programming, which is the process of writing and maintaining the source code, but in a broader sense of the term it includes all that is involved between the conception of the desired software through to the final manifestation of the software, ideally in a planned and structured process.[2] Therefore, software development may include research, new development, prototyping, modification, reuse, re-engineering, maintenance, or any other activities that result in software products.[3]

Software can be developed for a variety of purposes, the three most common being to meet specific needs of a specific client/business (the case with custom software), to meet a perceived need of some set of potential users (the case with commercial and open source software), or for personal use (e.g. a scientist may write software to automate a mundane task). Embedded software development, that is, the development of embedded software such as used for controlling consumer products, requires the development process to be integrated with the development of the controlled physical product.

The need for better quality control of the software development process has given rise to the discipline of software engineering, which aims to apply the systematic approach exemplified in the engineering paradigm to the process of software development.

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Jane Franken's comment, March 21, 2013 7:18 AM
I thought it wise to include an official definition of software development. There is much to explore in this Wikipedia entry but at the very least it will help give context for this discussion.