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Four Major Periods of Negative Social Mood Drive the 100-Year History of the American Security State

Four Major Periods of Negative Social Mood Drive the 100-Year History of the American Security State | Socionomics | Scoop.it
By Robert Folsom | Excerpted from the May 2014 Socionomist   Many people know that since 2001 the US government has expanded the reach of its domestic spying. What few people realize is that the government’s recent increase in the surveillance of its citizens is built upon at least a century … Continue reading →
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[Article] The Wave Principle Delineates Phases of Social Caution and Ebullience#axzz345AHiwDC

[Article] The Wave Principle Delineates Phases of Social Caution and Ebullience#axzz345AHiwDC | Socionomics | Scoop.it
This multi-decade study sketches a broad guide for anticipating phases in wealth-related social action. Robert Prechter and Alan Hall team up to discuss how four cyclical phases of social psychology influence attitudes on tax rates, financial regulation, relative financial wages, credit market debt, and wealth inequality. Continue reading →
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Reviving Clemency, Serving Justice

Reviving Clemency, Serving Justice | Socionomics | Scoop.it

On Wednesday, April 23, the Justice Department announced what would be the most sweeping reinvigoration of the clemency power in nearly four decades. This time, the purpose is to deal with the aftermath of the war on drugs, whose casualties are the thousands of people sentenced under harsh and outdated laws.

“For our criminal justice system to be effective, it needs to not only be fair; but it also must be perceived as being fair,” Deputy Attorney General James Cole said in a speech introducing the new policy. “These older, stringent punishments that are out of line with sentences imposed under today’s laws erode people’s confidence in our criminal justice system.”


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Socionomics Institute's curator insight, April 29, 2014 11:16 AM

With the US prison system dependent on drug arrests—particularly marijuana—any continued movement toward legalization will have a negative impact on the industry of incarceration. Compounding the problem is the impact decreased drug arrests will have on police budgets already dependent on cash and vehicles seized from suspected drug dealers. With fewer resources come fewer arrests, fewer convictions and fewer inmates.

 

A gut punch to the prison industry, particularly private prisons contracted by the government, will come when, as we described in 2009, states begin to argue that they can “save money by releasing non-violent drug offenders from prison.”

 

The Socionomist, November 2013

Learn more by reading The Socionomist here: http://www.elliottwave.com/r.asp?rcn=3rdpsismw&url=http://www.elliottwave.com/more_info/the-socionomist.aspx?code=SOCIONET&latest=on

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[Article] The Wave Principle Delineates Phases of Social Caution and Ebullience#axzz345AHiwDC

[Article] The Wave Principle Delineates Phases of Social Caution and Ebullience#axzz345AHiwDC | Socionomics | Scoop.it
This multi-decade study sketches a broad guide for anticipating phases in wealth-related social action. Robert Prechter and Alan Hall team up to discuss how four cyclical phases of social psychology influence attitudes on tax rates, financial regulation, relative financial wages, credit market debt, and wealth inequality. Continue reading →
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[Article] A Socionomic Study of Epidemic Disease#axzz345AHiwDC

[Article] A Socionomic Study of Epidemic Disease#axzz345AHiwDC | Socionomics | Scoop.it
Alan Hall's two-part in-depth study, “A Socionomic Study of Epidemic Disease,” shows how negative social mood establishes conditions precipitating outbreaks of epidemic diseases. Part 1 explores a 600-year history of diseases in bear markets and how society becomes vulnerable. Part 2 focuses on the psychological and physiological mechanisms by which negative social mood compromises human immunity, charts illustrating the timing and similarity of epidemics to financial manias and more potential threats on the horizon. Continue reading →
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