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Selfie, word of 2013, sums up our age of narcissism

Selfie, word of 2013, sums up our age of narcissism | Sociology | Scoop.it
It’s hard to think of a more appropriate symbol of kind of society we've become

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The Super Bowl As Sociology

The Super Bowl As Sociology | Sociology | Scoop.it
A new book called How Football Explains America can teach us a lot about the game's enduring (and evolving) popularity.
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Rescooped by Geoff Findley from Geography Education
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Population by Latitude and Longitude

Population by Latitude and Longitude | Sociology | Scoop.it
Radical Cartography, brought to you by Bill Rankin

Via Seth Dixon
Geoff Findley's insight:

Cool Cartogram...

 

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dilaycock's curator insight, January 9, 6:03 AM

Interesting stimulus for discussion of why do we live where we live.

Keisha Lewis's curator insight, January 12, 8:15 AM

Majorly cool! So many discussions about population distribution can come out of this. :)

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 6:53 PM

We can see that the majority of the world's population is clustered in the mid latitudes in particularly Asia. Showing population in terms of latitude shows how people live based on environmental factors while longitude remains the same throughout, thus showing countries/continents and their rates of population simply based off of that country's growth rate or demographic momentum aside from just looking at climatic preference. For instance, Asia is the most populated area and this is evident because of the current growth rates. 

Rescooped by Geoff Findley from Psychology, Sociology & Neuroscience
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The science of social connections

"I don't think it's a coincidence that of all the kinds of ways human beings could organize themselves into networks, that's what we do. We evince degree assortativity, and I don't think it's a coincidence that we do that. We assemble ourselves into groups, the group now has this property, this germ- resistance property, which is a property of the group, but which, as it turns out, also benefits and affects us. Now, being a member of that group, we are less likely to acquire pathogens.

And this sets the stage for a set of ideas that we and others have been exploring that shed light on multi-level selection and other kinds of contentious ideas in the biological and the social sciences. And we have a number of fellow travelers on this road—László Barabási, Dirk Helbing, Tooby and Cosmides, Frans de Waal, Nowak, Rand, Santos—people working on these related areas of interactions among animals and people, and what this means. In fact, David Rand and Josh Green and Martin Nowak just had a nice paper this past year — I was asked to highlight some papers—looking at whether you can use time to response as a kind of heuristic for understanding are people intuitive cooperators and rationally selfish, or do they exercise rational self-control over a kind of instinctive greed? The data they presented in that paper, to my eyes, was quite compelling—that we are intuitively wired to cooperate."


Via Howard Rheingold, VISÃO\\VI5I0NTHNG
Geoff Findley's insight:

Social Bonds

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, December 9, 2013 5:01 PM

Understanding the emergence of human culture requires an understanding of how social information and ideas spread through social networks -- and so does understanding the emergence and nature of human cooperation

luiy's curator insight, January 6, 5:45 AM

We can shift our perspective on lots of things when we think about people as being nodes on a graph, as being connected to other people. And this shift in focus might, in fact, prompt us to begin to think about —not the individuals themselves‑but the ties between them. This calls to mind an analogy, which I don't know if some of you may already know, of streets in the United States and in European countries. So, streets have names in our country, and the houses on the streets are numbered numerically and linearly as you move along the street. And the blocks between the streets don't have names or numbers and are seen as the things that are between the streets, and we don't pay much attention to them. But if you go to Japan, it's the blocks that are numbered. The blocks have names and the houses on the blocks are numbered in the order in which they were built, not numerically or linearly in any kind of systematic way. If you ask the Japanese, "What's going on with the streets?" they say, "The streets are the spaces between the blocks." They don't pay attention to those.

Rescooped by Geoff Findley from Psychology, Sociology & Neuroscience
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Scratch a Happy Adult, Find a Socially Connected Childhood

Scratch a Happy Adult, Find a Socially Connected Childhood | Sociology | Scoop.it
A new study finds that a happy life is much more about making friends than it is about making the grade.

Via VISÃO\\VI5I0NTHNG
Geoff Findley's insight:

Socialization

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Global wind conditions

Global wind conditions | Sociology | Scoop.it
an animated map of global wind conditions

Via Seth Dixon
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Wind...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 9:10 AM

Earlier I shared a dynamic map of near-live wind data for the United States and a static rendering of global wind patterns.  This combines the features of both of those resources to provide a mesmerizing digital globe.  Click on the 'earth' icon in the lower righthand corner to customize the display.  

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 1:07 PM

This animated depiction of the earth and it's global wind conditions  shows that the northern and southern part of the world refelects the same type of wind conditioons where as the "middle" of the world depicts  different types of trade winds. For example, the trade winds and other prevailing winds change throught time in the world as the axis rotates the different wind patterns rotate with them.

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Race and gender in higher education – who gets degrees? » Graphic Sociology

Race and gender in higher education – who gets degrees? » Graphic Sociology | Sociology | Scoop.it

By Laura Noren

 

"Creating coherent, compelling information graphics is left largely to individual practitioners. There is very little training available for social scientists who would like to have basic graphic design skills in their repertoire. Graphic Sociology analyzes the visual presentation of social data from the perspective of social science practice. Each blog consists of a chart, table, interactive graphic or other visual display of sociologically relevant data and an analysis of the successes and weaknesses of the graphic."

 

Creation of effective and informative information graphics, that simplfiy complex data and promote pattern recognition, is an important topic for the social sciences, particularly in higher education and for secondary education as well. Noren's blog is devoted to critical analysis of social science information graphics.

 

The topic of these graphics represent important issues in hgher education and Noren's analysis raises a number of important points regarding interpretation of the illustrated trends. -JL

 


Via Cynthia Alvarado, Jim Lerman
Geoff Findley's insight:

Race and Gender

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Rescooped by Geoff Findley from Psychology, Sociology & Neuroscience
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Selfie, word of 2013, sums up our age of narcissism

Selfie, word of 2013, sums up our age of narcissism | Sociology | Scoop.it
It’s hard to think of a more appropriate symbol of kind of society we've become

Via VISÃO\\VI5I0NTHNG
Geoff Findley's insight:

Trends

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