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Sociologie des réseaux sociaux
Social Network research and studies
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Dove lance #Beautyis, une plateforme qui renouvelle le genre du selfie.

Dove lance #Beautyis, une plateforme qui renouvelle le genre du selfie. | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it

i les e

BeerBergman's insight:

Si les #selfies sont ce que j'appelle #beyondbeauty, Dove a bien compris le message avec sa campagne #beautyis. Exemple d'un marketing qui vise la singularité des personnes, ce qui en soi représente un autre cadre normatif :-).

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BeerBergman's curator insight, February 13, 2014 6:56 AM

Si les #selfies sont ce que j'appelle #beyondbeauty, Dove a bien compris le message avec sa campagne #beautyis. Exemple d'un marketing qui vise la singularité des personnes, ce qui en soi représente un autre cadre normatif :-).

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It turns out people are better at protecting their privacy than companies would like

It turns out people are better at protecting their privacy than companies would like | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
The struggle between Facebook, Google and their users has led to an unexpected result, contends a new book on privacy: Every time social networks force openness on their users, people become much more guarded in what they share, leading internet giants to push for yet more openness. This is the argument made by three academic researchers,...
BeerBergman's insight:

I am currently reading the book (but must admit there is severe competition around in my library :-), but wanted to share this article with the world for the conclusion. Cyclic is a surprise ? Really ? :-)

Read the article. And the book. Excerpt.
***
"If you think of the end of privacy discourse, it is aways something that is presented in a linear way,” says Casilli. “We were surprised by the cyclicality of the results.”

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The Looking Glass Self: How Our Self-image is Shaped by Society

The Looking Glass Self: How Our Self-image is Shaped by Society | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
By Joachim Vogt Isaksen Do you sometimes experience that the mere presence of other people leads to feelings of discomfort and tension? When not knowing exactly what other people think of you it may lead to self-doubt and feelings of insecurity. According to the American sociologist Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), the degree of personal insecurity…
BeerBergman's insight:

Classical sociological theories. Excerpt.

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"Cooley´s concept of the looking glass self, states that a person’s self grows out of a person´s social interactions with others. The view of ourselves comes from the contemplation of personal qualities and impressions of how others perceive us. Actually, how we see ourselves does not come from who we really are, but rather from how we believe others see us."

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About

About | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it

"Criticisms of body shape, of gender performance and of ‘oversharing’ dominate in this environment, where notions of propriety are enacted not just on the targets of assessment, but also on the viewer. I call this multi-directional and dissipated form of discipline The Carceral Net: a term I have borrowed from Michel Foucault (Discipline and Punish: 297).My PhD research considers the potential for enacting disciplinary discourses through photography on social media. Such discourses seek to regulate subjects as they enter the public sphere of the In...

BeerBergman's insight:

"Criticisms of body shape, of gender performance and of ‘oversharing’ dominate in this environment, where notions of propriety are enacted not just on the targets of assessment, but also on the viewer. I call this multi-directional and dissipated form of discipline The Carceral Net: a term I have borrowed from Michel Foucault (Discipline and Punish: 297)."

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National Portrait Gallery - Panel Discussion The Curated Ego: What Makes a Good Selfie?

National Portrait Gallery - Panel Discussion The Curated Ego: What Makes a Good Selfie? | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
BeerBergman's insight:

Interesting panel discussion, and hopefully there will be a transcript to be found somewhere... For the moment, just a citation.

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"Philosophers have often linked personal identity to memory: it is suggested that we continue to be the same person as long as our memory with past events persist. But are memories unchanging, or even objective accounts of our experience that are stored in a glass bell? Or can memories be curated to fit a desirable image of the self?"

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Critical Review of Erving Goffman's The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life

Erving Goffman, a revered 20th century Canadian sociologist, is widely known for his capacity to unmask the comedic aspects of everyday life.
BeerBergman's insight:

Focusing for a while already on the concept of online authenticity and authenticity in tourism, I stumbled upon the writings of Erving Goffman. His book, The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life has been reviewed in this article. If you are interested in the topic, read it. Excerpt.

***

"In this article, Erving Goffman tries to answer the question of "Why do we perform?" Are we expected to perform? Do we perform to be accepted into society? Do we not realize it, or is performing just embedded into our everyday life? My impression is that Goffman is right on, performing is an unavoidable side effect of society existing. Fronts are created for us by a stereotype, which are in turn created by society. In order for an individual live they must typically be involved in a society. Ultimately, to bring this topic to a basic level, performing is required to live in a society with others."

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Contre l'hypothèse de la « fin de la vie privée »

Contre l'hypothèse de la « fin de la vie privée » | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
Au sein de la communauté internationale plusieurs voix se lèvent pour dénoncer l’érosion inexorable de la privacy dans le contexte des usages actuels du Web social.
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Oubliez les 6 degrés de séparation : ils ne sont plus que 4

Oubliez les 6 degrés de séparation : ils ne sont plus que 4 | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
BeerBergman's insight:

Qui n'a jamais croisé ce célèbre concept des 6 degrés de séparation, théorisant le fait qu'à l'heure de la mondialisation, de ses réseaux et interconnexions, il n'y aurait au maximum que cinq intermédiaires entre nous et n'importe qui dans le monde ? Et bien, avec Facebook, ce nombre a été presque divisé par deux : c'est ce qu'annoncent des chercheurs Taïwanais relayés par Fast Co.Exist. Une illustration concrète de la désintermédiation de la société par l'effet des outils numériques.

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PLOS ONE: Personality, Gender, and Age in the Language of Social Media: The Open-Vocabulary Approach

PLOS ONE: Personality, Gender, and Age in the Language of Social Media: The Open-Vocabulary Approach | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.
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Allies and Acquaintances: Two Key Types of Professional Relationships

Allies and Acquaintances: Two Key Types of Professional Relationships | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
As I wrote in my previous post, each type of relationship in your life is different. Today, we’re going to focus on two types of relationships that especially matter in a professional context:
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Centrality - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Within the scope of graph theory and network analysis, there are various types of measures of the centrality of a vertex within a graph that determine the relative importance of a vertex within the graph (e.g. how influential a person is within a social network, or, in the theory of space syntax, how important a room is within a building or how well-used a road is within an urban network). Many of the centrality concepts were first developed in social network analysis, and many of the terms used to measure centrality reflect their sociological origin.[1]

There are four measures of centrality that are widely used in network analysis: degree centrality, betweenness, closeness, and eigenvector centrality. For a review as well as generalizations to weighted networks, see Opsahl et al. (2010).[2]

Historically first and conceptually simplest is degree centrality, which is defined as the number of links incident upon a node (i.e., the number of ties that a node has). The degree can be interpreted in terms of the immediate risk of a node for catching whatever is flowing through the network (such as a virus, or some information). In the case of a directed network (where ties have direction), we usually define two separate measures of degree centrality, namely indegree and outdegree. Accordingly, indegree is a count of the number of ties directed to the node and outdegree is the number of ties that the node directs to others. When ties are associated to some positive aspects such as friendship or collaboration, indegree is often interpreted as a form of popularity, and outdegree as gregariousness.

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Friendship paradox - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The friendship paradox is the phenomenon first observed by the sociologist Scott L. Feld in 1991 that most people have fewer friends than their friends have, on average.[1] It can be explained as a form of sampling bias in which people with greater numbers of friends have an increased likelihood of being observed among one's own friends. In contradiction to this, most people believe that they have more friends than their friends have.[2]

The same observation can be applied more generally to social networks defined by other relations than friendship: for instance, most people's sexual partners have (on the average) a greater number of sexual partners than they have.[3][4]

In spite of its apparently paradoxical nature, the phenomenon is real, and can be explained as a consequence of the general mathematical properties of social networks. The mathematics behind this are directly related to the arithmetic-geometric mean inequality and the Cauchy-Schwartz inequality.

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The Documented Life

We constantly interrupt our experiences to make a record of them.
BeerBergman's insight:

Sally Turkle's analysis of what selfies, as a part of online life, do to our social systems. She has done extensive research to the effects of digital life to social systems. Although I do partly agree with her conclusions of this article, I continue to dislike the ideologic sauce of a better past. Good article though, must read. Excerpt.

***

"These days, when people are alone, or feel a moment of boredom, they tend to reach for a device. In a movie theater, at a stop sign, at the checkout line at a supermarket and, yes, at a memorial service, reaching for a device becomes so natural that we start to forget that there is a reason, a good reason, to sit still with our thoughts: It does honor to what we are thinking about. It does honor to ourselves.

It is not too late to reclaim our composure. I see the most hope in young people who have grown up with this technology and begin to see its cost. They respond when adults provide them with sacred spaces (the kitchen, the family room, the car) as device-free zones to reclaim conversation and self-reflection.

A 14-year-old girl tells me how she gets her device-smitten father to engage with her during dinner: “Dad, stop Googling. I don’t care about the right answer. I want to talk to you.”.

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"The selfie, like all technology, causes us to reflect on our human values. This is a good thing because it challenges us to figure out what they really are. "

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BeerBergman's curator insight, February 13, 2014 6:55 AM

Sally Turkle's analysis of what selfies, as a part of online life, do to our social systems. She has done extensive research to the effects of digital life to social systems. Although I do partly agree with her conclusions of this article, I continue to dislike the ideologic sauce of a better past. Good article though, must read. Excerpt.

***

"These days, when people are alone, or feel a moment of boredom, they tend to reach for a device. In a movie theater, at a stop sign, at the checkout line at a supermarket and, yes, at a memorial service, reaching for a device becomes so natural that we start to forget that there is a reason, a good reason, to sit still with our thoughts: It does honor to what we are thinking about. It does honor to ourselves.

It is not too late to reclaim our composure. I see the most hope in young people who have grown up with this technology and begin to see its cost. They respond when adults provide them with sacred spaces (the kitchen, the family room, the car) as device-free zones to reclaim conversation and self-reflection.

A 14-year-old girl tells me how she gets her device-smitten father to engage with her during dinner: “Dad, stop Googling. I don’t care about the right answer. I want to talk to you.”.

***

"The selfie, like all technology, causes us to reflect on our human values. This is a good thing because it challenges us to figure out what they really are. "

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Selfies are like sweaters

BeerBergman's insight:

You really should take a close look into his categorized #selfies : excellent collection and excellent statement. Excerpt.

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"First of all: In order to be narcissistic, a selfie has to be an individual expression, a glorification of the ego. But as this website shows, selfies are as individualistic as slices of bread: they all look the same. The persons on the selfies are different, but instead of trying to enhance their individual qualities, they try to blend in. And blending in is not a narcissistic quality, on the contrary."

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'Selfies With Homeless People' Is The Latest Vile Teen Trend To Get Its Own Tumblr

'Selfies With Homeless People' Is The Latest Vile Teen Trend To Get Its Own Tumblr | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
The third installment of a series of unfortunate selfies has arrived.
BeerBergman's insight:

Pas très joyeux, cette nouvelle mode... Mais la collection de ces selfies avec les sans abris pourraient nous aider à dévoiler pourquoi les gens font certaines choses bizarres.

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"One of my favorite things about social media is seeing so many people, without knowledge of each other, do or say the exact same thing. It's like a gigantic social experiment in odds-making—why do some ideas become so common? And I think it's even more fascinating when all these people have the same highly questionable idea. Selfies are just a perfect expression of our basest Internet urges: They can be meant seriously or a joke, they're both communicative and totally self-centered, are both meant to be private and public, and prominently feature the person taking the action.

So I gather these because I think it's useful to look at them as a group and wonder: Why is this happening over and over?



Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/selfies-with-homeless-people-2014-2#ixzz2t27Rv72D"

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Selfie Bingo!

Selfie Bingo! | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
There was a talk about selfies at the National Portrait Gallery in London a few weeks ago ( and when I was there I talked to Annebella Pollen who was chairing the session. As we were talking, antic...
BeerBergman's insight:

Exciting, and very funny bingo card. Read the comment of the artist:

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"


My stance? I guess I don’t really have one stance, because to me selfies are so varied, and serve so many purposes for so many different people, that it would be like saying what my stance on writing would be. Well, maybe not writing, but you get my point?

As a researcher, I’m so much more interested in all the values which people associate with selfies, and photography generally, than the images themselves. Like the way they make people so angry – I find that *fascinating*.

But if you ask me, people can photograph themselves however they like, selfies or no!

And thanks for the congrats!"

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How the Friendship Paradox Makes Your Friends Better Than You Are | MIT Technology Review

How the Friendship Paradox Makes Your Friends Better Than You Are  | MIT Technology Review | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
The friendship paradox is the empirical observation that your friends have more friends than you do. Now network scientists say your friends are probably wealthier and happier, too.

Via Dominique Cardon
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Table_des_matieres_ouvrage_Allal_Pierret.pdf

BeerBergman's insight:

POur la collection : table des matières sur le sujet des révolutions - car leur lien avec les outils de géolocalisation et le viral (réseaux sociaux) est évident. - Pour rappel.

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Latour : Network, societies, spheres: reflections of an actor-network theorist

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Six Degrees: Urban Myth?

Replicating the small world of Stanley Milgram. Can you reach anyone through a chain of six people.
BeerBergman's insight:

Interesting point of view on Stanley Milgram's study on a Small World Theory. Excerpt.

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"There is also a difference between what we mean by a small-world experience and what mathematicians mean. We are not talking about the chances of connection between two people taken at random. We are talking about the chances of meeting a person who knows someone from our past. Over a lifetime, these chances are high, especially for educated people who travel in similar networks.

And when an especially unlikely connection occurs, the world does feel small, whether or not the scientific evidence agrees."

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Socialogy: Interview with Nilofer Merchant

Socialogy: Interview with Nilofer Merchant | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
I first met Nilofer at a conference where she knocked me over with her observations about the changing world of business. And since then I have returned to her writings at the Harvard Business Review and other publications as a source of new ideas.
BeerBergman's insight:

Nothing really new here, but an interesting interview, juxtaposing the current/new ideas about the future of work. A must read. Excerpt.

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"As “work” is increasingly freed from “a job”, you need to build connections and community based on interests, capabilities, and of course your passions and NOT on a view to get to “the top”. The top of some big behemoth organization is not the only way to power; increasingly, power is a function of how you know to get things done."

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Most Influential Emotions on Social Networks Revealed | MIT Technology Review

Most Influential Emotions on Social Networks Revealed  | MIT Technology Review | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
Anger spreads faster and more broadly than joy, say computer scientists who have analysed sentiment on the Chinese Twitter-like service Weibo.
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BeerBergman's curator insight, September 18, 2013 1:01 PM

Interesting. And now we are waiting a Western analysis based on Tweets... A must-read. 

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"The moral of the story is that when it comes to the spread of information, anger is more powerful than other emotions."

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Sampling bias - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In statistics, sampling bias is a bias in which a sample is collected in such a way that some members of the intended population are less likely to be included than others. It results in a biased sample, a non-random sample[1] of a population (or non-human factors) in which all individuals, or instances, were not equally likely to have been selected.[2] If this is not accounted for, results can be erroneously attributed to the phenomenon under study rather than to the method of sampling.

Medical sources sometimes refer to sampling bias as ascertainment bias.[3][4] Ascertainment bias has basically the same definition,[5][6] but is still sometimes classified as a separate type of bias.[5]

Sampling bias is mostly classified as a subtype of selection bias,[7] sometimes specifically termed sample selection bias,[8][9][10] but some classify it as a separate type of bias.[11] A distinction, albeit not universally accepted, of sampling bias is that it undermines the external validity of a test (the ability of its results to be generalized to the rest of the population), while selection bias mainly addresses internal validity for differences or similarities found in the sample at hand. In this sense, errors occurring in the process of gathering the sample or cohort cause sampling bias, while errors in any process thereafter cause selection bias.

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