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Oubliez les 6 degrés de séparation : ils ne sont plus que 4

Oubliez les 6 degrés de séparation : ils ne sont plus que 4 | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
BeerBergman's insight:

Qui n'a jamais croisé ce célèbre concept des 6 degrés de séparation, théorisant le fait qu'à l'heure de la mondialisation, de ses réseaux et interconnexions, il n'y aurait au maximum que cinq intermédiaires entre nous et n'importe qui dans le monde ? Et bien, avec Facebook, ce nombre a été presque divisé par deux : c'est ce qu'annoncent des chercheurs Taïwanais relayés par Fast Co.Exist. Une illustration concrète de la désintermédiation de la société par l'effet des outils numériques.

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Sociologie des réseaux sociaux
Social Network research and studies
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Les réseaux sociaux en ligne : Un espace de sociabilité étudiante

Présentation d’Antonio A. Casilli (Centre Edgar-Morin, IIAC, CNRS/EHESS) à la conférence L’Etudiant / Educpros « Réseaux sociaux : pourquoi et comment
BeerBergman's insight:
Cette présentation pourra intéresser mes étudiants :-)
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CECI Jean-François's curator insight, March 21, 3:55 AM

Pour bien comprendre les notions de liens forts, faibles, le friending numérique...intéressant!

Marco Bertolini's curator insight, March 21, 9:49 AM

Une présentation qui casse quelques mythes à propos des "digital natives" et des risques de "désocialisation" sur Internet !

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Context Collapse: A Literature Review » Cyborgology

Context Collapse: A Literature Review » Cyborgology | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
BeerBergman's insight:

Excellent paper on context collapse - with extensive bibliographic resources. A must read. Excerpts.

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"

boyd (2008) refers to the new interaction structure resulting from an increasingly mediated form of sociality as “networked publics,” with the key interaction media being social network sites. Social network sites are defined as ‘‘web-based services that allow individuals to (1) construct a public or semi-public profile within a bounded system, (2) articulates a list of other users with whom they share a connection, and (3) view and traverse their list of connections and those made by others within the system” (boyd and Ellison 2007). The content generated within network publics hold particular affordances and interconnected dynamics. In particular, content produced and consumed through social media and within networked publics is persistent, replicable, scalable, and searchable. With these affordances, actors within a networked public must manage invisible audiences, context collapse, and the blurring of private and public (boyd 2010).
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With this in mind, we further expound upon the literature surrounding context collapse, and its affects upon interaction and identity processes. Social actors hold many roles throughout the life course and simultaneously at any given moment within the life course. For instance, one may be a mother, sister, athlete, student, and exotic dancer. For each role, the social actor maintains particular identity meanings guiding who s/he is, and a network of others who (typically) share these expectations. Although the expectations across roles may coincide neatly, it is most often the case that each role bears slightly different meanings, and in some cases, highly contradictory ones.
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Similarly, Goffman (1959) demonstrates the skillful ways in which social actors reveal and conceal aspects of themselves for varying audiences, maintaining separate faces within distinct social arenas, while Leary (1995) discusses playing to each audience, their values, and their perceived positive opinion of the actor.
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Indeed, social network sites are first and foremost social, and each profile is a co-construction through public wall posts and tagged status updates, pictures, and comments (Marwick and Ellison 2012; Vitak 2012). That is, profiled content is both self-generated and other generated. Through the warranting principle (Walther, Van Der Heide, Hamel, and Shulman 2009), audiences give greater credence to other-generated content (OGC), granting the tagged picture greater weight than the image posted intentionally by the actor her/himself.
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Moreover, efforts to limit the network, and in particular, explicit efforts to curate the profiled content, run counter to expectations of accurate representation and threaten authenticity (Davis 2012)."

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The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life

The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life is a seminal sociology book by Erving Goffman. It uses the imagery of the theatre in order to portray the importance of human social interaction. Published in 1959, it was Goffman's first and most famous book, for which he received the American Sociological Association's MacIver award in 1961.

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For the archives.

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Survey Says Facebook Feeds Narcissism [STUDY]

Survey Says Facebook Feeds Narcissism [STUDY] | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
In a rather small survey conducted by a young psychologist, Facebook was shown to have some interesting correlations with self-esteem and narcissism in young adults. In a survey...
BeerBergman's insight:

More studies about the link between narcissism and increased social media use. For you archives. Excerpt.

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"The researcher notes that this study is intended to be a preliminary look at nonynous social networking, a fairly new field for academic scrutiny. As we abandon the fake avatars and cryptic usernames of years past and begin associating our online identities with our real-world lives, our online activities begin to have more relevance to our true personality traits."

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Frequent Twitter and Facebook Users: You Might Be Narcissists

Frequent Twitter and Facebook Users: You Might Be Narcissists | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
At least, according to a new study from the University of Michigan
BeerBergman's insight:

Exploring the link between narcissism and increased social media use, not concluding there is definite proof :-). Excerpt.

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"Young people may over-evaluate the importance of their own opinions," communication studies doctorate and researcher Panek said in the statement. "Through Twitter, they're trying to broaden their social circles and broadcast their views about a wide range of topics and issues."

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As far as middle-aged adult narcissists; the study determined this group posted frequent Facebook status updates as a way to garner approval. "It's about curating your own image, how you are seen, and also checking on how others respond to this image," Panek said. "It's about curating your own image, how you are seen, and also checking on how others respond to this image," Panek said. "Middle-aged adults usually have already formed their social selves, and they use social media to gain approval from those who are already in their social circles.""

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Dove lance #Beautyis, une plateforme qui renouvelle le genre du selfie.

Dove lance #Beautyis, une plateforme qui renouvelle le genre du selfie. | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it

i les e

BeerBergman's insight:

Si les #selfies sont ce que j'appelle #beyondbeauty, Dove a bien compris le message avec sa campagne #beautyis. Exemple d'un marketing qui vise la singularité des personnes, ce qui en soi représente un autre cadre normatif :-).

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BeerBergman's curator insight, February 13, 6:56 AM

Si les #selfies sont ce que j'appelle #beyondbeauty, Dove a bien compris le message avec sa campagne #beautyis. Exemple d'un marketing qui vise la singularité des personnes, ce qui en soi représente un autre cadre normatif :-).

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It turns out people are better at protecting their privacy than companies would like

It turns out people are better at protecting their privacy than companies would like | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
The struggle between Facebook, Google and their users has led to an unexpected result, contends a new book on privacy: Every time social networks force openness on their users, people become much more guarded in what they share, leading internet giants to push for yet more openness. This is the argument made by three academic researchers,...
BeerBergman's insight:

I am currently reading the book (but must admit there is severe competition around in my library :-), but wanted to share this article with the world for the conclusion. Cyclic is a surprise ? Really ? :-)

Read the article. And the book. Excerpt.
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"If you think of the end of privacy discourse, it is aways something that is presented in a linear way,” says Casilli. “We were surprised by the cyclicality of the results.”

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The Looking Glass Self: How Our Self-image is Shaped by Society

The Looking Glass Self: How Our Self-image is Shaped by Society | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
By Joachim Vogt Isaksen Do you sometimes experience that the mere presence of other people leads to feelings of discomfort and tension? When not knowing exactly what other people think of you it may lead to self-doubt and feelings of insecurity. According to the American sociologist Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), the degree of personal insecurity…
BeerBergman's insight:

Classical sociological theories. Excerpt.

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"Cooley´s concept of the looking glass self, states that a person’s self grows out of a person´s social interactions with others. The view of ourselves comes from the contemplation of personal qualities and impressions of how others perceive us. Actually, how we see ourselves does not come from who we really are, but rather from how we believe others see us."

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About

About | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it

"Criticisms of body shape, of gender performance and of ‘oversharing’ dominate in this environment, where notions of propriety are enacted not just on the targets of assessment, but also on the viewer. I call this multi-directional and dissipated form of discipline The Carceral Net: a term I have borrowed from Michel Foucault (Discipline and Punish: 297).My PhD research considers the potential for enacting disciplinary discourses through photography on social media. Such discourses seek to regulate subjects as they enter the public sphere of the In...

BeerBergman's insight:

"Criticisms of body shape, of gender performance and of ‘oversharing’ dominate in this environment, where notions of propriety are enacted not just on the targets of assessment, but also on the viewer. I call this multi-directional and dissipated form of discipline The Carceral Net: a term I have borrowed from Michel Foucault (Discipline and Punish: 297)."

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National Portrait Gallery - Panel Discussion The Curated Ego: What Makes a Good Selfie?

National Portrait Gallery - Panel Discussion The Curated Ego: What Makes a Good Selfie? | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
BeerBergman's insight:

Interesting panel discussion, and hopefully there will be a transcript to be found somewhere... For the moment, just a citation.

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"Philosophers have often linked personal identity to memory: it is suggested that we continue to be the same person as long as our memory with past events persist. But are memories unchanging, or even objective accounts of our experience that are stored in a glass bell? Or can memories be curated to fit a desirable image of the self?"

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Critical Review of Erving Goffman's The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life

Erving Goffman, a revered 20th century Canadian sociologist, is widely known for his capacity to unmask the comedic aspects of everyday life.
BeerBergman's insight:

Focusing for a while already on the concept of online authenticity and authenticity in tourism, I stumbled upon the writings of Erving Goffman. His book, The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life has been reviewed in this article. If you are interested in the topic, read it. Excerpt.

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"In this article, Erving Goffman tries to answer the question of "Why do we perform?" Are we expected to perform? Do we perform to be accepted into society? Do we not realize it, or is performing just embedded into our everyday life? My impression is that Goffman is right on, performing is an unavoidable side effect of society existing. Fronts are created for us by a stereotype, which are in turn created by society. In order for an individual live they must typically be involved in a society. Ultimately, to bring this topic to a basic level, performing is required to live in a society with others."

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123-WHOLE-PART-FINAL.pdf

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Contre l'hypothèse de la « fin de la vie privée »

Contre l'hypothèse de la « fin de la vie privée » | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
Au sein de la communauté internationale plusieurs voix se lèvent pour dénoncer l’érosion inexorable de la privacy dans le contexte des usages actuels du Web social.
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20th WCP: Peirce, Virtuality, and Semiotic

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"The concept of virtuality is deeply embedded in Peirce's doctrine of signs and hence in his semiotic doctrine of mind. In this Peircean doctrine, which has been more recently echoed in the writings of Wittgenstein and Popper, we find the most promising philosophical framework available for the understanding and advancement of the project of augmenting human intellect through the development and use of virtual technologies."

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An Internet Where Everyone Knows You're a Dog

An Internet Where Everyone Knows You're a Dog | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it

The soirtSo I deleted my Facebook account about a week ago - the most recent changes to their privacy policy were one step further than I wanted to go (and it seemed certain that there were going to be many...

BeerBergman's insight:

The sort of posting that I do not know whether to put it in the sociology or society scoop... Well, whatever. For the archives. Note that I do not agree with the author, but it is hard to define exactly why. Will have to read more. 

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Facebook's Zuckerberg: "Having two identities for yourself is an example of a lack of integrity" | MichaelZimmer.org

Facebook's Zuckerberg: "Having two identities for yourself is an example of a lack of integrity" | MichaelZimmer.org | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
BeerBergman's insight:

Interesting article about the integrity of people claiming more than one personality, as put by the writer as a comment on a statement by Zuckerberg.

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I fully understand the authors point of view, all but one : Zuckerberg never said you had to publish everything visible to everybody. Facebook's structure allows you to swift from one context to another, displaying different personal and corporate information to different sets of people. Basically it comes down to one person, different contexts, differents information flows. Correct me if I am wrong!

Excerpt.

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"There are many different definitions of identity, not all of which make sense. I prefer the view that an identity is a set of assertions about yourself that you may lay claim to. So in a sense everyone only has one identity and has only ever had one ‘identity’. But in practice we expose different sets of claims depending on the circumstances. Nobody puts their membership in Alcoholics Anonymous on their CV."

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You're so vain: U-M study links social media and narcissism

You're so vain: U-M study links social media and narcissism | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
Facebook is a mirror and Twitter is a megaphone, according to a new University of Michigan study exploring how social media reflect and amplify the culture's growing levels of narcissism. ANN ARBOR—
BeerBergman's insight:

Exploring the link between narcissism and increased social media use, but from another source. 

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"Facebook is a mirror and Twitter is a megaphone, according to a new University of Michigan study exploring how social media reflect and amplify the culture's growing levels of narcissism."

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Quand vous tombez amoureux, voici ce que voit Facebook - Rue89

Quand vous tombez amoureux, voici ce que voit Facebook - Rue89 | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it

Ca vuAu sein de la firme de Mark Zuckerberg, il existe un département appelé "Facebook Data Science". Des chercheurs y broient les statistiques des comportements des 1,2 milliard d'utilisateurs du réseau.Dans un article rédigé par l'un d'entre eux, Carlos Diuk -- et opportunément publié le jour de la Saint-Valentin -- on apprend ainsi qu'il est possible de prédire la vie sentimentale des inscrits, en fonction de la fréquence des messages échangés. Ce qui fait un peu peur quand même.Quand la "période...

BeerBergman's insight:

Ca vaut ce que ça vaut, mais c'est intéressant quand-même :-). A lire. Extrait.

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"A quoi servent ces recherches, se demanderont les plus candides. Le modèle de Facebook repose sur la publicité, et donc le ciblage, répondront les autres."

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The Documented Life

We constantly interrupt our experiences to make a record of them.
BeerBergman's insight:

Sally Turkle's analysis of what selfies, as a part of online life, do to our social systems. She has done extensive research to the effects of digital life to social systems. Although I do partly agree with her conclusions of this article, I continue to dislike the ideologic sauce of a better past. Good article though, must read. Excerpt.

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"These days, when people are alone, or feel a moment of boredom, they tend to reach for a device. In a movie theater, at a stop sign, at the checkout line at a supermarket and, yes, at a memorial service, reaching for a device becomes so natural that we start to forget that there is a reason, a good reason, to sit still with our thoughts: It does honor to what we are thinking about. It does honor to ourselves.

It is not too late to reclaim our composure. I see the most hope in young people who have grown up with this technology and begin to see its cost. They respond when adults provide them with sacred spaces (the kitchen, the family room, the car) as device-free zones to reclaim conversation and self-reflection.

A 14-year-old girl tells me how she gets her device-smitten father to engage with her during dinner: “Dad, stop Googling. I don’t care about the right answer. I want to talk to you.”.

***

"The selfie, like all technology, causes us to reflect on our human values. This is a good thing because it challenges us to figure out what they really are. "

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BeerBergman's curator insight, February 13, 6:55 AM

Sally Turkle's analysis of what selfies, as a part of online life, do to our social systems. She has done extensive research to the effects of digital life to social systems. Although I do partly agree with her conclusions of this article, I continue to dislike the ideologic sauce of a better past. Good article though, must read. Excerpt.

***

"These days, when people are alone, or feel a moment of boredom, they tend to reach for a device. In a movie theater, at a stop sign, at the checkout line at a supermarket and, yes, at a memorial service, reaching for a device becomes so natural that we start to forget that there is a reason, a good reason, to sit still with our thoughts: It does honor to what we are thinking about. It does honor to ourselves.

It is not too late to reclaim our composure. I see the most hope in young people who have grown up with this technology and begin to see its cost. They respond when adults provide them with sacred spaces (the kitchen, the family room, the car) as device-free zones to reclaim conversation and self-reflection.

A 14-year-old girl tells me how she gets her device-smitten father to engage with her during dinner: “Dad, stop Googling. I don’t care about the right answer. I want to talk to you.”.

***

"The selfie, like all technology, causes us to reflect on our human values. This is a good thing because it challenges us to figure out what they really are. "

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Selfies are like sweaters

BeerBergman's insight:

You really should take a close look into his categorized #selfies : excellent collection and excellent statement. Excerpt.

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"First of all: In order to be narcissistic, a selfie has to be an individual expression, a glorification of the ego. But as this website shows, selfies are as individualistic as slices of bread: they all look the same. The persons on the selfies are different, but instead of trying to enhance their individual qualities, they try to blend in. And blending in is not a narcissistic quality, on the contrary."

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'Selfies With Homeless People' Is The Latest Vile Teen Trend To Get Its Own Tumblr

'Selfies With Homeless People' Is The Latest Vile Teen Trend To Get Its Own Tumblr | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
The third installment of a series of unfortunate selfies has arrived.
BeerBergman's insight:

Pas très joyeux, cette nouvelle mode... Mais la collection de ces selfies avec les sans abris pourraient nous aider à dévoiler pourquoi les gens font certaines choses bizarres.

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"One of my favorite things about social media is seeing so many people, without knowledge of each other, do or say the exact same thing. It's like a gigantic social experiment in odds-making—why do some ideas become so common? And I think it's even more fascinating when all these people have the same highly questionable idea. Selfies are just a perfect expression of our basest Internet urges: They can be meant seriously or a joke, they're both communicative and totally self-centered, are both meant to be private and public, and prominently feature the person taking the action.

So I gather these because I think it's useful to look at them as a group and wonder: Why is this happening over and over?



Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/selfies-with-homeless-people-2014-2#ixzz2t27Rv72D"

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Selfie Bingo!

Selfie Bingo! | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
There was a talk about selfies at the National Portrait Gallery in London a few weeks ago ( and when I was there I talked to Annebella Pollen who was chairing the session. As we were talking, antic...
BeerBergman's insight:

Exciting, and very funny bingo card. Read the comment of the artist:

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"


My stance? I guess I don’t really have one stance, because to me selfies are so varied, and serve so many purposes for so many different people, that it would be like saying what my stance on writing would be. Well, maybe not writing, but you get my point?

As a researcher, I’m so much more interested in all the values which people associate with selfies, and photography generally, than the images themselves. Like the way they make people so angry – I find that *fascinating*.

But if you ask me, people can photograph themselves however they like, selfies or no!

And thanks for the congrats!"

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How the Friendship Paradox Makes Your Friends Better Than You Are | MIT Technology Review

How the Friendship Paradox Makes Your Friends Better Than You Are  | MIT Technology Review | Sociologie des réseaux sociaux | Scoop.it
The friendship paradox is the empirical observation that your friends have more friends than you do. Now network scientists say your friends are probably wealthier and happier, too.

Via Dominique Cardon
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Table_des_matieres_ouvrage_Allal_Pierret.pdf

BeerBergman's insight:

POur la collection : table des matières sur le sujet des révolutions - car leur lien avec les outils de géolocalisation et le viral (réseaux sociaux) est évident. - Pour rappel.

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Latour : Network, societies, spheres: reflections of an actor-network theorist

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