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Sacred Heart Spirituality
Insights on my Sacred Heart Spirituality and life as an RSCJ
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To Succeed, Forget Self-Esteem

To Succeed, Forget Self-Esteem | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
What's important is self-compassion.
Annette Schmeling's insight:

People who share a vision of community operate with compassion and gratitude/appreciation toward self & each other.  The strength of an individual and/or a community can be witnessed in its capacity to embrace the good within, and the belief/capacity to have something to give.

 

As we contemplate and recognize the struggles of those we serve, we see the same needs exist within us. Finding fault, fragmentation, shaming and worrying about unmet needs is more about the need of being right than giving voice to the parts of us or of our community that feel marginalized. 

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David Hain's curator insight, December 28, 2012 2:55 AM

Nice reverse take on the usual positive thinking mantra. Focus on learning and keep taking risks and making mistakes!

Carla Goddard,Msc.D.'s curator insight, June 27, 2013 9:04 PM

Self compassion is often forgotten in society.  When one views life with self compassion their gratitude in life increases, thus setting the signature of receiving and viewing life with gratitude.

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The Disease of Being Busy

The Disease of Being Busy | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
What happened to a world in which we can sit with the people we love so much and have slow conversations about the state of our heart and soul, conversations that slowly unfold, conversations with pregnant pauses and silences that we are in no rush to fill?
Annette Schmeling's insight:

Technology can be an anxiety-producing energy depending on our approach. How we discipline ourselves and think about the daily onslaught of e-mail, voicemail, and text messages impacts how much we are truly connected or disconnected in our life. 


A friend recently reminded me - at the end of the day God will ask:

How well did you love?

How many hearts did you touch?

How deeply did you let go?


"Gathered around the table of life, where each one offers her bread as nourishment for all, we recognize dialogue as the way to a more human world…" (Society of the Sacred Heart, General Chapter 2008)



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hahah you got to check this out - http://goo.gl/QJIdMf
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Why did the crowd turn on Jesus?

Why did the crowd turn on Jesus? | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
“Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the Highest!” We know how the rest of the story goes. Jesus—acclaimed as the one who is to save his people—enters Jerusalem to a crowd’s...
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Out of the Woods: Ambient Addiction--More from Mark Muldoon

Out of the Woods: Ambient Addiction--More from Mark Muldoon | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
Annette Schmeling's insight:

Out of the Woods Blogger Diane reminds us of the connection between addiction and our spiritual journey. Our media rich, always-on, over-communicated society make us so susceptible to "ambient addictions**." Noise crowds into every empty space, leaving us spiritually, mentally and emotionally exhausted. The capacity to quiet the mind, awareness of the present moment and full presence (mind, emotions, spirit and physical) opens the "doors to the sacred." 

 

 

 

 

 

** “An ambient addiction is a misguided but seemingly acceptable strategy to gain control over debilitating feelings of inadequacy and shame disguised as anxiety.” (Mark Muldoon) 

 

 

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Kathryn Jean Lopez - Monica and a Dose of Mercy

Kathryn Jean Lopez - Monica and a Dose of Mercy | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
An exhausted Hillary Clinton crying on the New Hampshire primary trail. Bill Clinton’s heart ailment. Jimmy Carter equating actual religious persecution in the world with religious teachings that he believes demean women (see his latest book). They’re all reminders that politicians are people, too.

With the reappearance on the national stage of Monica Lewinsky, the young woman at the center of the impeachment battle of the late 1990s, one storyline is a review of who did not come to her aid back in the day. The “one free grope” pass that leading feminists gave their favored president, when faced with questions of abuse of power and sexual harassment, was far from the feminist movement’s best moment. But those weren’t pretty days, and living through them once was enough. Recycling rhetoric from two decades ago does little good now — unless you’re a campaign strategist thinking it can help your candidate, or hurt a rival. It also might miss the most important lessons of that shameful moment of contemporary history.

#ad#In her Vanity Fair piece, Lewinsky writes about the impact Tyler Clementi had on her life. Clementi was an 18-year-old Rutgers University freshman who killed himself after a video of him kissing another man was made public. The death deeply affected Lewinsky’s mother, whose heart bled for Clementi’s parents. Lewinsky realized her mother “was reliving 1998, when she wouldn’t let me out of her sight. She was replaying those weeks when she stayed by my bed, night after night, because I, too, was suicidal. The shame, the scorn, and the fear that had been thrown at her daughter left her afraid that I would take my own life — a fear that I would be literally humiliated to death.”

Life does go on, though. Humiliation can even strengthen us, stripping us of pretension and of a false sense of control of the elements and the trajectory of our all-too-human lives. Lewinsky writes that in the wake of Clementi’s death her “own suffering took on a different meaning. Perhaps by sharing my story, I reasoned, I might be able to help others in their darkest moments of humiliation.”

New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd took a familiar cynical view of Lewinsky’s announcement that she feels a call to help those who in our reality-TV/social-media times have their reputations destroyed by our tell-all/show-all/shock-all culture. And all are certainly free to be skeptical. But it may also be that the bleeding is so great in our times that it might just be imperative to hope that Lewinsky does have an impact. You don’t have to take her at her word, but let’s consider — maybe just for one opinion column, anyway — the humanity.

Today, just about everything is a spectacle to comment on. People’s lives — sometimes by conscious choice, often just because it’s the air we breathe now — are lived in public. Abortion is presented as a privacy issue, even as one woman tapes hers for the viewing, and the public square has become the venue for the insistence on the availability of abortion and even, at times it seems, a preference for it, while only the pain is supposed to be private.

But sometimes, now and again, we are reminded that even the high and mighty — even the former president and his first lady, who may become president herself — are human. By all means be absolutely truthful — investigate a secretary of state’s role in the Benghazi disaster — and have robust political debates. But remember, too, that there is more to life than our mistakes and our wrongheaded political platforms — or our campaign successes.

Reading the Vanity Fair piece, we are reminded of the humiliation Hillary Clinton suffered. As political junkies devour the latest news story on the road to 2016 — although much of it is not really new — we are reminded that even power couples are dealing with the drama of life, whatever the choices they’ve made. Mrs. Clinton, confiding to a friend, might have tried to cast her husband in the best possible light, even while furious at him. The first lady of the United States might have gone on TV doing her best stand-by-her-man thing, even while denying doing anything of the sort. None of that changes the fact that she’s a woman, a wife, and a mother, having to read about her family’s ugly secrets in the newspaper. Again and again.

When Ted Kennedy died, my immediate reaction was to remember how I would sometimes sit behind him in church. Kennedy seemed to be praying. The powerful senator was a man. One whom I disagreed with, but whom I can still pray for. I hope he prayed for the young Heritage Foundation intern he saw on the Communion line, too!

When we fail to see the humanity, we’ve lost something of our souls. One is reminded of the Christmas Truce of 1914; even in the midst of war, sworn enemies on the battlefield can stop and realize there is something more.

In his new book, What Works, newspaper columnist Cal Thomas makes a suggestion: “Start introducing yourself to people of political persuasions different from yours. Build a relationship with them if they would be willing to join a group you are putting together that would focus on solving problems instead of winning elections. Eventually you can invite your elected representatives to observe what you are doing and the success you are having.” He suggests, “When they see there is no political price to pay — and much which they can benefit — they are more likely to identify with what you’re doing than they are with the lobbyists and contributors who clamor for their attention and votes.” Think about common goals and results, he suggests. In the book he lays out a whole host of contentious issues and opportunities for convergence. Also, opening lines that make clear that you’re more about humanity than ideology. And that your politics are actually based on wanting to see people do well in life.

The next time you see your political enemy stumble, consider it an opportunity. Not to go in for the kill, not for false civility, but for brotherly love. It might just make our politics more merciful. And more constructive. It may even be the chance justice has to soar.

— Kathryn Jean Lopez is editor-at-large of National Review Online and a founder of Catholic Voices USA. This column is based on one available exclusively through Andrews McMeel Universal’s Newspaper Enterprise Association.
Annette Schmeling's insight:

"When we fail to see humanity, we've lost something of our souls." Excellent reflection and congruent with the call of the 2008 Chapter of the Society of the Sacred Heart - "With  a contemplative heart inhabited by the Spirit, we listen to the world as it shares its hopes and suffering."  Lopez reminds us that presence is an act of justice and dialogue as a way to live our humanity . 

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Pope Francis — Moral Leadership for the Economy

Pope Francis — Moral Leadership for the Economy | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
Pope Francis brings his deepest values to his understanding of the economy. The economy is meant to serve men and women, to provide a means for them to flourish in the world. Men and women were not created to serve the economy.
Annette Schmeling's insight:

Pope Francis understands the difference between greed and free market capitalism, and so do the people that control the cash flow around the globe. The Pope has been consistent in word and action (http://bit.ly/19JCjSc) in his mission to live faithfully to the Gospel message and his vow of poverty. 

 

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Veteran Jesuit explains choice to return to lay life | National Catholic Reporter

Veteran Jesuit explains choice to return to lay life | National Catholic Reporter | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
Annette Schmeling's insight:

A prophetic witness. This is a profound statement that warrants respect, sincere and serious reflection. I respect Bert for his transparency, compassion and courage. Truly a man with and for others. 

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Andrew Solomon: Love, no matter what | Video on TED.com

What is it like to raise a child who's different from you in some fundamental way (like a prodigy, or a differently abled kid, or a criminal)?
Annette Schmeling's insight:

This beautiful meditation reminds me to continue to love and to be vulnerable enough to receive love. Andrew powerfully challenges us to open our heart and mind. The sense of belonging and being loved are everyones irreducible needs. 


Likewise, Henri Nouwen reminds me of the power of loving deeply in his book "The Inner Voice of Love:" 

 

"Do not hesitate to love and to love deeply.

 

You might be afraid of the pain that deep love can cause. When those you love deeply reject you, leave you, or die, your heart will be broken. But that should not hold you back from loving deeply. The pain that comes from deep love makes your love ever more fruitful. It is like a plow that breaks the ground to allow the seed to take root and grow into a strong plant. Every time you experience the pain of rejection, absence, or death, you are faced with a choice. You can become bitter and decide not to love again, or you can stand straight in your pain and let the soil on which you stand become richer and more able to give life to new seeds.

 

The more you have loved and have allowed yourself to suffer because of your love, the more you will be able to let your heart grow wider and deeper. When your love is truly giving and receiving, those whom you love will not leave your heart even when they depart from you. They will become part of your self and thus gradually build a community within you.
Those you have deeply loved become part of you. The longer you live, there will always be more people to be loved by you and to become part of your inner community. The wider your inner community becomes, the more easily you will recognize your own brothers and sisters in the strangers around you. Those who are alive within you will recognize those who are alive around you. The wider the community of your heart, the wider the community around you. Thus the pain of rejection, absence, and death can become fruitful. Yes, as you love deeply the ground of your heart will be broken more and more, but you will rejoice in the abundance of the fruit it will bear." (Henri Nouwen)

 

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Thin Places, Where We Are Jolted Out of Old Ways of Seeing the World

Thin Places, Where We Are Jolted Out of Old Ways of Seeing the World | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
Thin places, where the distance between heaven and earth collapses, can relax us and transform us — or, more accurately, unmask us.
Annette Schmeling's insight:

Thin Place #1: Wrapped in a wool blanket, under the Northern Lights in the Rocky Mountains, my Dad explained how much God loved me. 

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15 Assumptions You Should Make Today

15 Assumptions You Should Make Today | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
"4. Assume that there is no one out there keeping a tally of all of your failings, ready to throw it in your face when you're either feeling too good or too awful about yourself."
Annette Schmeling's insight:

Being loved and having a sense of belonging are universal irreducible human needs. 

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The Magic of Compassion Science, by Janis Daddona

The Magic of Compassion Science, by Janis Daddona | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
James Doty is no stranger to struggle. He served as a caregiver in a family whose mother was an invalid and father suffered from alcoholism. They were on public assistance all that time.
Annette Schmeling's insight:

The human connection is transformational. Taking time to make the connection with another human being is life changing, particularly for those who are most vulnerable. Compassion is at the heart of our charism.

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Human Trafficking Victim Shares Story Of Captivity On 'Freedom Day'

Human Trafficking Victim Shares Story Of Captivity On 'Freedom Day' | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
Margaret Howard became a victim of domestic human trafficking at 13 years old, when she ran away from home and was later picked up on a southern Illinois interstate amid passing motorists -- then drugged and held against her will.
Annette Schmeling's insight:

Religious of the Sacred Heart join women and men of conscience in advocating against human trafficking, also called modern slavery. It has become a practice to bring particular attention to the tragedy of human trafficking during the annual NFL Super Bowl. This year, the big game will be played in New Orleans, known for its hospitality and commitment to "les bons temps." Unfortunately, where tourists congregate, so do traffickers. RSCJ have joined with others in New Orleans for more than a year to help with education and advocacy efforts. We invite you to play a part in our fight by joining us in prayer.

 

http://rscj.org/node/2070

 

 

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January 25, 2013 ~ Rev. Lillian Daniel on “Spiritual But Not Religious” | Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly | PBS

January 25, 2013 ~ Rev. Lillian Daniel on “Spiritual But Not Religious” | Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly | PBS | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
A mature religious faith,” says Rev. Lillian Daniel, is “practiced in community over time.” It is “reasonable, rigorous, real, grounded in tradition, and centered in worship.”
Annette Schmeling's insight:

Rev. Lillian Daniel blasts the ‘spiritual but not religious’ crowd. Young adults in particular are less willing to follow any rules, particularly the rules of any organized religion. In an age where there is greater awareness of global realities and our interconnectedness, we are raising a generation that is more confident, open-minded & ambitious but also cynical, depressed, lonely and anxious (Generation Me by Jean Twenge). Church attendance across all faiths has declined and media outlets and smart marketers have bombarded us with promoting the ‘self’ (I, me, mine and myself).

 

Rev Daniel offers an open-minded invitation to religion and a deep respect for traditions and wisdom outside ourselves. Love and belonging are fundamental and irreducible needs of all people. We are hardwired for connection and the absence of connection always leads to suffering. Living community, belonging to a faith-based worshipping community & a willingness to be in relationship gives witness that love, hope, justice and peace are possible. The “highly individualized” and “make-your-own-religion” mindset is predictable when people abandon organized religions’ restrictive rules, black and white thinking and having people telling others what their lifestyle should be. Spirituality and religion together will strengthen our effort to make a difference in the lives of others and in our world.

 

“With gratitude, we celebrate the daily efforts of men and women in search of a better world. With them, strengthened by the Spirit, we want to continue finding the face of God in the future towards which we journey.” (RSCJ Chapter 2008)

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In Praise of Softness

In Praise of Softness | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
A metaphorically rich reminder that the "hard" values we so often revere and strive for in this modern world often supplant the necessary gentleness required to cultivate relationships, understanding, and love of one another.
Annette Schmeling's insight:

Being "strong" is a very safe psychological position. After years of accumulating scars, most of us develop a strong set of defenses to protect ourselves. We buy into the belief that you can't survive without developing thick skin and a "wall around our heart." Omid Safi offers practical reasons why it's important to keep a soft heart. This is the precise place where we can discover God's love in the wounds of the world and to be transformed so that we can see the face of God in one another. 

 

Keeping an open heart, a soft heart is the gift of being alive. "Am I open enough to allow you to see me in all of my human imperfections? With my fear and rawness. Can I be that real with you? And can I be that real with myself?" 


"In prayer we come to Him with everything that touches our life, with the sufferings and hopes of humanity. We learn to remain in silence and poverty of heart before Him. In the free gift of ourselves we learn to adore and abide in His love." 

Society of the Sacred Heart Constitutions

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The Gift of Good Questions

The Gift of Good Questions | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
How we ask each other questions can evoke a deeper sense of self. Words of advice from Parker Palmer and a poem by Denise Levertov on the power of asking with good intention, and hearing each other into being.
Annette Schmeling's insight:

A beautiful question, generated from loving curiosity, can begin a shift in the way that we perceive or think about something. When we suspend our judgments and familiar ways of knowing and free us from entrenched thinking. Contemplative Dialogue invites connections and questions and enables shared meaning and the possibility of a new worldview. "Yes, perhaps this gift is your answer." 

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Introspective or Narcissistic?

Introspective or Narcissistic? | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
The answer to that question might be found in whether you keep a journal.
Annette Schmeling's insight:

Asking the right questions, suggests David Brooks, is the difference between introspection and narcissism. Questions like "Do I fit in?" or "How do I look?" end up being misdirected. But questions like "What am I doing? or "Who does this serve?" draws us to the broader landscape and attunes us to the heartbeat of the world and nearer to solving its problems of poverty, injustice and war. 


With a contemplative heart we are able to listen deeply to our hopes & convictions, fears and joys. Contemplation is about being emotionally and mentally honest. Contemplative prayer is exactly about choosing silence and to "let ourselves be opened to our inner depths where the Spirit of God allows us to feel, see and understand life and reality with God's heart." Taking a long, loving look at the real is an invitation to loving awareness & compassion. 

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On the Seventh Day, We Unplug: How and Why to Take a Tech Sabbath

On the Seventh Day, We Unplug: How and Why to Take a Tech Sabbath | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
this story is brought to you by vapor-distilled smartwater, who found unique inspiration for their water by looking up to the sky. we hope the change in perspective this piece offers will help inspire you.what's this? Go ahead. Put down that smartphone. It's good for the soul.
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The Spirituality of Dialogue | RSCJ.org

The Spirituality of Dialogue | RSCJ.org | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it

The spirituality of dialogue is a dance of spiritual moves where each partner in the dialogue relies on the other to complete the steps, the beautiful moves that “do their fertile work and redeem our spirit.”

 

Annette Schmeling's insight:

Donna Dolan, RSCJ describes the experience and value of dialogue as a Christian value. Perhaps the most important aspect of the dialogue was the power of being present and staying connected throughout the process. By suspending judgments and listening deeply the members of the Canadian and United States Province were drawn together around a new possibility that was unfolding. The dialogue process allowed people to see that the future could be different and still to preserve the essence of the old system. I truly believe that the new USC Province, forged through the common connection, unlocks our deepest levels of commitment and our sacred duty. 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 25, 2014 12:05 AM

Dialogue has a spiritual basis. In reading Martin Buber, Parker Palmer, David Bohm, Juanita Brown, etc. there work draws extensively from various wisdom traditions. I used William Isaacs' work in teaching. He used many of the noted authors and others to build on ideas like mining for questions.

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Searching for Womanhood | Deep South Magazine – Southern Food, Travel & Lit

Searching for Womanhood | Deep South Magazine – Southern Food, Travel & Lit | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
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Jonathan Safran Foer's Commencement Address at Middlebury College

International best-selling author Jonathan Safran Foer gave the commencement address at Middlebury College on May 26, 2013. Foer's first novel, "Everything I...
Annette Schmeling's insight:

“I worry that the closer the world gets to our fingertips, the further it gets from our hearts.” Jonathan Safran Foer, Middlebury 2013 Commencement speaker, reflects on how our personal technologies are diminishing us. 

 

Turning off our devices and allowing ourselves to be open and vulnerable to the present moment increases our capacity to connect. Keeping ourselves busy or distracted and collecting data is not the same as being present and attentive to our needs and the needs of others. “Simply put, the more distracted we become and the more emphasis we put on speed at the expense of depth, the less able we are to care.” (Jonathan Safran Foer)

 

The Society of the Sacred Heart 2008 Chapter speaks to our need for contemplation and drawing on the depth of God's Love: 

"...we are called to stop, to choose silence and to open and let ourselves be opened to our inner depths where the Spirit of God allows us to feel, see and understand life and reality with God's heart.... Then in the secret place of the heart the Spirit gradually transforms our feelings and responses, and draws us into an intimate relationship with God." (#RSCJ2008Chapter)

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Stand By Me | Playing For Change | Song Around The World

http://playingforchange.com - From the award-winning documentary, "Playing For Change: Peace Through Music", comes the first of many "songs around the world" being…
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"Taking" Time

"Taking" Time | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
"It takes an hour to get there." Do you ever realise that when we talk about the duration of an activity we use the verb take? "How long will it take?" It's an odd verb to use yet it's such a norma...
Annette Schmeling's insight:

Prayer is the highest state. It is the return to the root of your being. To be still and to be aware cannot be made in haste. St. Ignatius invites us to take into consideration everything that influences our choices and decisions - imagination, emotions, memories, sinfulness, regrets, hopes, etc. In a culture that honors busyness, Andy Otto reminds us to "TAKE Time."

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Let's stop treating busy as a badge of honor

Let's stop treating busy as a badge of honor | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
Social Media expert Karen Tingen discusses our collective obsession with being busy.

 

We take a little pride in being busy, really busy, too busy. Maybe this validates us, gives us a sense of purpose, lets us feel there is value to our life. But I think it’s time we stop to consider the impact of our busy-ness and stop holding it in such high regard.


Via Barb Jemmott
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Annette Schmeling's comment, April 25, 2013 9:10 PM
Wayne Muller, in his book A Life of Being, Having and Doing Enough, points out how the Seven Deadly Sins have been repurposed as the new Seven American Values: "We're number one! (Pride) You can have it all! (Greed) Sex sells! (Lust) I just want to be famous on TV! (Envy) All you can eat! (Gluttony) The world owes everything to me! (Sloth) If any bad guys stand in my way, well, bring 'em on! (Anger)." Busyness is a badge of honor and has lead to a culture of exhaustion, disappointment, fear and anger.

Simplifying our choices and being more mindful and prayer-full makes possible a place for deep listening, dependency on others, right action, gratitude, compassion, mercy, and happiness from the inside out.
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 Psyche Under Seige Part I

 Psyche Under Seige Part I | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
After giving a lecture where I discussed the Holocaust, an elderly man approached me.  I could see a genuine kindness and compassion in his face, and also sensed that his soul had seen far too much...
Annette Schmeling's insight:

Dr. Michael Conforti opens a dialogue to a deeper understanding of the individual and collective fear & paranoia (and I would add the unresolved anger) that is at the root of the proliferation of violence. The vulnerability and fragility that we experience in our lives and our world, left unresolved, creates a hardened and broken heart. Our world is caught in a vicious circle. 

 

The Society of the Sacred Heart Chapter of 2008 calls us to search for the best way to respond to the needs of the world and a dialogue of cultures and to join in communal discernment how to be the "Heart of God in the world." 

 

"Gathered around the table of life, where each one offers her bread as nourishment for all, we recognize dialogue as the way to a more human world, a life with Spirit." (RSCJ Chapter 2008: Dialogure toward Communion: Walking with Humanity)

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Sacred Heart sister's love for Christ burns bright | St. Louis Review

Sacred Heart sister's love for Christ burns bright | St. Louis Review | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it

Mary Pat Rives, RSCJ in on her third career, but it's possibly the one that's had the widest impact.

Annette Schmeling's insight:

Living our charism. 

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4 scientific studies on how meditation can affect your heart and brain

4 scientific studies on how meditation can affect your heart and brain | Sacred Heart Spirituality | Scoop.it
Many people have tried to sell me on meditating. Sometimes I try it, and have a refreshing experience. But usually not.
Annette Schmeling's insight:

Radiating a convincing presence, like Andy has in this video, communicates having deep and passionate convictions. Real presence is not a superficial facade or manipulated image; it is an expression of his authentic being. How can you help but notice his assuredness and his character. 

 

Mindfulness or contemplation over time will reveal the true character of a person. 

 

"...we are called to stop, to choose silence and to open and let ourselves be opened to our inner depths where the Spirit of God allows us to feel, see and understand life and reality with God's heart.... Then in the secret place of the heart the Spirit gradually transforms our feelings and responses, and draws us into an intimate relationship with God." (#RSCJ2008Chapter)

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, January 27, 2013 2:03 PM

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