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Socialmedia8
Weekly compilation of top pharma social media news around the globe
Curated by Jean Cruz
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A social pill for pharma

A social pill for pharma | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it

Pharmaceutical companies are slow to board the social media bus, but the rest of the healthcare industry isn’t waiting around.

 

Online health information is readily available, and consumers have no reservations about tapping the Internet and social environments to find it.


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The future of engagement for pharma is: disengagement

The future of engagement for pharma is: disengagement | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it

‘While paradoxically, the consumer actively engages much less with [a] brand when they begin to rely upon an application for a particular service[...] we need to learn to see this as a marketing positive. They may clock off from the often tiresome active engagements via our website, but don’t mistake this cold shift in engagement for a drop in loyalty.’

 

The title of the Michael Bayler article from which this post is derived is arresting, but the argument it articulates is less compelling, and the conclusion is wide of the mark from my point of view.

 

Why sound this apologia for the collapse of the precepts of marketing?

 

Why look for ‘marketing positives’ in social environments that are innately hostile to the concepts of ‘marketing’ as they developed in offline contexts?

 

Why not accept that the social web is a postmarketing environment rather than repeatedly trying to reformulate maxims that are antithetical to the expectations and etiquettes of social in every way imaginable?

 

Why enter social environments in such a deterministic manner, and one which would appear designed to make companies unpopular?

 

What fideism supports the leap of faith underpinning the expectation that ‘loyalty’ to a brand (the etiology of which is never adequately defined) should be eroded in settings where attempts to influence directly have corrosive effects?

 

The reason that I found the title interesting in the first place, however, is that it conjures images of the tightrope that healthcare will need to tread in the future: informed by Big Data, but facilitated by networks that may become more focused as ties strengthen, relationships develop, and new matrices of trust, influence and authority emerge.

 

If you do not sit in the middle of these matrices, you will always remain on their margins, struggling to gain purchase, and losing your grip.

 

The social web is paradox: burgeoning volumetrically, yet contracting in terms of engagement opportunities for new entrants as communities coalesce.


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Sanofi, diabetes and social media

Sanofi, diabetes and social media | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it

Sanofi's social media use is certainly at the high end of what would be expected from a major pharmaceutical company, but what makes the company's use of these channels particularly interesting is its focus.

 

The company has corporate presences on Facebook and Twitter, but across these, and other social media channels, Sanofi US concentrates heavily on diabetes.

 

The company uses Twitter as a customer service tool for its GoMeals iPhone and iPad apps, when it started blogging last year it was with the Discuss Diabetes blog and, of course, there are diabetes-themed Twitter and Facebook accounts.

 

Sanofi is the only pharma company to focus its social media efforts so firmly on one therapy area give a real sense of a company looking to own pharma social media in diabetes.

 

This makes sense, with one in three Americans expected to have diabetes by 2050 the condition is a major focus for the industry. Product-wise it is an important time for Sanofi, which in June released a major safety study on its flagship insulin brand Lantus (insulin glargine) and submitted its GLP-1 agonist Lyxumia (lixisenatide) to regulators in the US, Europe and Japan for approval.

 

But another key factor is Dennis Urbaniak, who is the head of Sanofi's US diabetes business unit and a long-time advocate of social media in pharma.

 

I caught up with him recently to find out more about how Sanofi uses social media in diabetes, the 'real time point of view' it can offer and why social media should never be thought of as an advertising channel.

 

What benefits has Sanofi seen from its use of social media channels, such as the diabetes blog and Twitter?

 

"Our main benefit has been just how much we have learned by engaging directly with the diabetes community. The social nature of these platforms has allowed us to meet a lot of new people, listen to what they have to say, and start a conversation with them on living with diabetes, which has brought so much valuable perspective for our entire team."

 

How does the time the company invests in these channels compare with what goes into traditional channels?

 

"In the US, we have a dedicated team overlooking this effort with a dedicated community manager, Laura Kolodjeski, who manages the communication and writes our Discuss Diabetes blog.

"We also encourage the rest of our team members to participate directly in the conversation or at least indirectly by listening.

 

"As we gain more experience with the diabetes community, the level of time, interest, and resource to this approach continues to grow because we are seeing so much value in the approach in terms of our own education."

 

You mentioned Laura's involvement, is social media the responsibility of just one person at Sanofi or are more people involved?

 

"We have several people engaged in social activity in the US, which includes a core formal team with Laura Kolodjeski and Michele Polz, who also coordinate closely with Susan Brooks, Lindsey Schedler, and Jack Cox from US Communications.

 

"I personally like to spend as much time as I can using social media because I have seen tremendous value in doing this and I strongly encourage all my team members to find a way to engage in a way that they are comfortable.

 

"We have also established a corporate social media policy and now provide access to social sites for all employees in the company to encourage them to get a direct view of the conversations that are taking place every day in the communities we serve."

Would you like to see more Sanofi employees use social media as part of their jobs, and would your company benefit from this?

 

"I definitely would. We have a strong passion and commitment at our company for gaining a deep understanding of the healthcare consumer’s point of view and I have found social media to be a highly effective way to help to gain this understanding.

 

"When used properly, the benefit to our company comes in three main ways, first you get a real time direct point of view that you would never get in traditional research approaches, second you meet very interesting people with great ideas on things that can be done better to satisfy healthcare consumers with something they really need, and third you teach employees the benefit of transparent customer feedback, which greatly enhances the quality of what we are delivering to the market."

 

Where do these channels fit within the communications mix for Sanofi and how do you integrate them with traditional communications activities?

 

"In my opinion, these channels are listening and dialogue channels that give us a unique opportunity to contribute to a community.

 

"The integration internally should come through sharing the learning from this experience with our other programmes to help strengthen the quality of the content and programmes we are developing.

 

"I also feel very strong that we always need to respect the community first, meaning we always need to be transparent about our presence and our intent, which is to learn from, and where appropriate, contribute to the communities we are interested in serving.

 

"We should never look at these channels as advertising or promotion channels and should only provide this information when it is requested and in a format that satisfies our regulatory obligations.

 

"For me, this is very easy to support because we are not engaging to promote but to learn and hopefully take away approaches that could help improve our other communications."

 

What potential do new communications channels have in diabetes when it comes to reaching patients and prescribers, and to what extent do you think Sanofi has fulfilled that potential?

 

"I think the potential is significant in the context of learning the true needs of the healthcare consumers we serve, identifying new approaches to add more value to them and involving them in developing new solutions, everything from treatment research and development to new commercial platforms that can actually improve the customer experience.

 

"We have not even come close to fulfilling this potential and I don’t see it as a point where we will claim that we have, I see it as a commitment to ongoing engagement and contribution to the communities we care about, which is a responsibility we all have in healthcare."


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Top Five Trends Changing the Game in Global Healthcare IT

Top Five Trends Changing the Game in Global Healthcare IT | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it

Top Five Trends Changing the Game in Global Healthcare IT http://t.co/WsQXBgXs...


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Games for Change: Teaching With Portal, Fixing Brains With iPhone

Games for Change: Teaching With Portal, Fixing Brains With iPhone | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it

 

For a few years now, there has been great deal of interest in using videogame technology to improve health and education. So far, there haven’t been any blockbusters in this space outside of “exergaming” titles like Wii Fit. I attended the Games for Change Festival in New York last month, and what I saw there gave me reason to believe that there will be some big hits for education and health videogames in the near future.

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Dr Mike Sevilla on physicians, social media and pharma: challenges and opportunities


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How A Video Game Is Helping To Heal Stroke Victims

How A Video Game Is Helping To Heal Stroke Victims | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it
One out of 18 people die from a stroke. Those who live are lucky, but still deal with its after effects, as strokes often damage the areas in the brain that coordinate movement.

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Case studies: two tactical examples from pharma facebook pages

Case studies: two tactical examples from pharma facebook pages | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it

In February 2012, Facebook unveiled Facebook Timeline that threw social media marketers for a loop. The new layout practically took away the capability to have a great landing page in order to have individuals to “Like” a brand page.

 

Instead, Facebook provides a framework in which companies are given the opportunity to boost engagement with fans. In order to properly take advantage of the timeline function, a content strategy is required.

 

[AS: This article somewhat misleadingly bills itself as 'Content strategy: the backbone of a facebook timeline for pharma', but actually offers two tactical examples of individual facebook posts from Pharma accounts. Even the most generous gloss couldn't really call that a 'content strategy' per se, but no matter :)]


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What patients want from pharma cos?

What patients want from pharma cos? | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it

During my recent time at the World Orphan Drug Congress, I had the pleasure of a nice dinner and conversation with some operations folks from a larger pharmaceutical company, otherwise affectionately known in our crowd as “big pharma.”

Interestingly enough, while we talk about big pharma entering the rare disease space for MPS/ML, some of the companies more established in our space are definitely not “small” by pharma standards – Shire and Genzyme/Sanofi. Let’s be honest, at the end of the day, what we want is a drug that works for our children. Period. If the science isn’t there, then it’s not a two way street in any event.

But if the science is there, if the pharma-patient relationship will likely be there in the future, what do we want now? What will we want then?

1. Transparency

2. Commitment

3. Compassion

4. Partnership

 


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What are the 'mutant materials' in the design and delivery of healthcare?


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Five ways for pharma to use social media

Five ways for pharma to use social media | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it

A discussion of pharma's experiments in social media via:

 

* Corporate presences

* Regional accounts

* Disease awareness campaigns

* Corporate social responsibility efforts

* Clinical trial patient recruitment


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Industry group releases digital best practices

Industry group releases digital best practices | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it
Weary of FDA foot-dragging on digital and social media guidance for pharmas, a group of 60-some industry digerati have put together guidelines of their own.

 

The Digital Health Coalition (DHC) said its seven “Guiding Principles and Best Practices for Companies and Users” represents a consensus of the industry's top digital marketers. Questions of control over content—and when pharmas are responsible for correcting misinformation they find online—were the thorniest, said founder Mark Bard, and will be explored further by a working group.

 

“The definition of control has a fundamental impact on everything,” said Bard. “Everything cascades off that question of when control begins and ends.”

 

For now, the DHC presented the issue in principle No. 2: “Regulated healthcare companies are not responsible for user-generated content online that they do not control. Regulated healthcare companies are deemed to 'control' health and medical content if (i) it owns such health and medical content and has material editorial authority or (ii) it paid for the creation of such content and has material editorial authority over such content."

On the related issue of companies' obligations to correct misinformation, the DHC's principles say: “Regulated healthcare companies should endeavor to make reasonable efforts to correct misinformation that is factually incorrect.”

 

Though the document was conceived as an exercise in industry self-regulation, the group hopes it will inform FDA thinking on the topic.

 

“We know from conversations that it's very helpful to regulators to communicate what consensus thinking around topics is today,” says Bard, though noting that the DHC's best practices represent not official company policies but rather a sounding of top execs tasked with digital marketing and communications at pharmas.

 

The seven principles, said DHC's Joe Farris, “are a starting point. We don't view them as the holy grail of guidance. They're not the final document but a starting point from which to move the industry and the conversation further. We look forward to debating them and they're open to comment.”

 

The principles and best practices are as follows:

 

1) Regulated healthcare companies should endeavor to participate in social media as a means to promote public health, improve patient outcomes and facilitate productive patient/physician relationships.

 

2) Regulated healthcare companies are not responsible for user-generated content online that they do not control. Regulated healthcare companies are deemed to “control” health and medical content if (i) it owns such health and medical content and has material editorial authority or (ii) it paid for the creation of such content and has material editorial authority over such content.

 

3) Regulated healthcare companies have a responsibility to report adverse events they become aware of. Regulated healthcare companies should follow the existing adverse event reporting rules in place at the FDA.

 

4) Employees of regulated healthcare companies should disclose their material company relationship when posting comments/content or engaging in an online conversation relating to a company product or relevant healthcare issue.

 

5) Regulated healthcare companies should endeavor to respond to questions on sites they control within a reasonable period of time, and to implement reasonable measures to enable timely responses to crisis and emergency situations.

 

6) Regulated healthcare companies should endeavor to make reasonable efforts to correct misinformation that is factually incorrect.

 

7) Regulated healthcare companies should endeavor to appoint employee(s) tasked with the role of “patient liaison” focused on representing the best interests of the patient online.


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More Pharma firms entering deeper Social waters with confidence

More Pharma firms entering deeper Social waters with confidence | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it

Greg Singh writes:

 

'While many businesses have raced to build their presence in the online social sphere, pharmaceutical companies have been typically shielded away from these channels over concerns with liability for monitoring adverse eventsand entering unknown territory. It’s understandable, as, not surprisingly, pharmaceutical is under greater scrutiny than many other industries.

 

But as social media reached a tipping point in 2011, with mainstream acceptance among marketers, we also saw many more leading pharmaceutical firms making broader forays into social media.'

 

[AS: the more experienced a swimmer you are, the more capable you are likely to have become. #noshortcuttosocial]


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Advancing Pharma's Social Media Listening Analytics

Advancing Pharma's Social Media Listening Analytics | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it

The pharmaceutical industry still lags other industries in spending on outbound social media programs that engage customers directly, but they are – at least Big Pharma is – spending more on so-called inbound social media software and analytics, which lets them listen to what is being said online about brands and unmet needs and match that up marketing strategies.A new report from IDC Health Insights, titled “Worldwide Pharmaceutical Social Media Analytics 2012 Vendor Assessment,” found that pharma marketing departments are “starving for new ways to measure market sentiment, competitive analysis and promotional effectiveness” in areas that were previously difficult to gauge, according to Eric Newmark, program director, life sciences, IDC Health Insights and author of the report. “Companies are trying to answer questions like, ‘What are the sentiments being shared by our highest targeted physicians about brands in popular online communities,’ or ‘What is the biggest unmet need among our highest targeted physicians?’”


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Marianne Paterson's curator insight, January 16, 1:45 PM

are we competing here?

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6 Ways to Make Pinterest Work for Healthcare Organizations | Social Media Today

6 Ways to Make Pinterest Work for Healthcare Organizations | Social Media Today | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it

Have you considered using Pinterest for your healthcare practice? Perhaps you don’t think you have anything interesting to offer on such a visual platform. Wrong!

Many healthcare organizations such as yours are already using Pinterest with amazing results. A good example is Dayton Children’s Medical Center.


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Wow! Twitter can tell you when you are going to get sick!

Wow! Twitter can tell you when you are going to get sick! | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it

Adam Sadilek at the University of Rochester and his team analyzed 4.4 million GPS-tagged Tweets from over 600,000 users in New York City over the course of one month in 2010. Using their artificial intelligence algorithm to ignore tweets by healthy people such as those claiming they were 'sick' of a particular song, and train it to find those who were really ill, they are able to track with nearly 90% accuracy and almost 8 days in advance.

DC - Will this work in India? We did observe some trends in malaria around mumbai. Interesting!

 

 


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The iRobot Doc Will See You Now: Roomba Maker Enters the ER

The iRobot Doc Will See You Now: Roomba Maker Enters the ER | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it
Some of us complain their doctors are too stiff, lack warmth and are too robotic. But calling such doctors “robots” may be a disservice to RP-Vita — the latest telepresence, healthcare bot from InTouch Health and iRobot.

 

RP-VITA (Remote Presence Virtual + Independent Telemedicine Assistant), unveiled this week at the Clinical Innovations Forum in Santa Barbara, is a remote-controlled telepresence robot that combines InTouch’s “telemedicine” technology and the autonomous navigation innovations introduced in iRobots’ AVA robot at CES in 2011.

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Deborah Verran's comment, July 24, 2012 4:32 PM
The big question is will patients 'like' this approach and where and how is the technology best utilised?
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Pharma Marketing in India - The need to explore newer pastures

The pharmaceutical industry is evolving in India and so is pharma marketing. With the changing scenario at all levels – Doctors, patients & promotion, the pharma marketer has newer challenges to face. With technology changing drastically and newer emerging medias taking centre stage, can the marketer benefit? This presentation tries to capture this evolving dynamics.


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Pfizer vows to learn from virtual trial failure

Pfizer vows to learn from virtual trial failure | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it
Several months after Pfizer failed to recruit patients to its first ever virtual trial, the firm said it was looking to learn from the setback.

 

The pilot REMOTE trial was looking to recruit 600 patients suffering from overactive bladder disorder, and was asking them to use electronic diaries to record their experiences.

 

It was designed so that patients could avoid having to travel to clinics during the trial.

 

It was a first for pharma - as reported by InPharm last year - but the hype succumbed to practical difficulties when no one signed up for the trial.

Writing on Pfizer’s ‘Think Science Now’ blog, Craig Lipset, head of clinical innovation at Pfizer, said: “This pilot was testing a series of modules needed to enable patients to participate in a […] clinical trial entirely from home.

 

“Patient recruitment was one of many modules being tested, and the other modules worked very well. In the near-term we are focused on applying these successful modules to studies being planned and executed at Pfizer today.”

 

He added that the firm would not shy away from using social media and online tools to recruit patients, despite the problems it has had, and would re-launch REMOTE in 2013.

 

Lipset said: “I also want to clarify that this project does not represent a failure for, or withdrawal from the use of the internet or social media for patient recruitment.

 

“We routinely use the internet as a channel for recruitment in our studies and will continue to do so wherever it is appropriate. Recruitment strategies tend to be very study-specific, and we will be working to refine such strategies specific to a virtual trial approach.”

 

Comment

 

But a major problem with this trial, given the condition it targets, is that many patients affected by overactive bladder disorder are elderly, and may not use the internet as regularly as younger patients.

 

This could have been one reason as to why the REMOTE pilot failed to recruit and will prove to be a systemic problem for all trials targeting diseases that afflict the elderly.


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Seven steps to a pharma digital strategy - Digital Handbook - Digital strategy

Seven steps to a pharma digital strategy - Digital Handbook - Digital strategy | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it

When it comes to setting out the ‘big thinking’ behind your planned use of digital Ben Tilly, marketing channel manager at Sanofi, suggests seven steps to establishing a digital strategy that place the company’s objectives at its heart.

He says pharma marketers should:

• Establish the key business objective before the channel and even before key performance indicators (KPIs) have been considered.

• Have a thorough understanding of the target audience, including who they are and what their behavioural patterns are


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Healthcare Social Media Study Shows Enormous Opportunity for Companies

Healthcare Social Media Study Shows Enormous Opportunity for Companies | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it
Healthcare companies are launching social media sites (eight in 10 healthcare corporations have at least one social entity), but community sites have a whopping 24 times more social media activity than corporate sites.

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Device industry reputation is better than pharma's, say patient groups

Device industry reputation is better than pharma's, say patient groups | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it

A new report published by PatientView entitled ‘Corporate Reputation of the Medical Device Industry: the Patient Perspective’ suggests that:

 

● 52% of the respondent patient groups believe that the multinational medical device industry has a ‘good’ or ‘excellent’ corporate reputation ...
... making the industry the second most-respected sector in healthcare. By way of contrast, the equivalent figure for the pharmaceutical industry is 40%.

● But only 33% of the respondent patient groups think that the reputation of the medical device industry has improved during the past five years.
32% of the respondent patient groups say that the industry’s reputation has declined, while 35% believe that its reputation remains has remained unchanged.

● 64% of the respondent patient groups say that the medical device industry is ‘good’ or ‘excellent’ at being innovative.

● 57% of the respondent patient groups say that the medical device industry is ‘good’ or ‘excellent’ at ensuring patient safety ...
... even though a number of the respondent groups mention recent medical-device-related scandals.

● But only 32% of the respondent patient groups say that the medical device industry is ‘good’ or ‘excellent’ at practising ethical marketing.

● Just 30% of the respondent patient groups say that that the medical device industry is ‘good’ or ‘excellent’ at being transparent with external healthcare stakeholders.

● Just 22% of the respondent patient groups say that that the medical device industry is ‘good’ or ‘excellent’ at adopting fair pricing practices.

 

Key findings for the corporate reputation of 18 individual medical device companies

The top-6 medical device companies are:

 

Coloplast ranks first. This company has the best corporate reputation from the patient perspective.
Medtronic ranks 2nd.
Smith & Nephew 3rd.
Roche Diagnostics 4th.
Abbott and Johnson & Johnson are joint 5th.

 

The study used six indicators to measure the reputation of individual medical device companies:

 

• Indicator I. Whether the company has an effective patient-centred strategy.
• Indicator II. The quality of the information that the company provides to patients.
• Indicator III. The company’s record on patient safety.
• Indicator IV. The usefulness of the company’s products to patients.
• Indicator V. The company’s record of transparency with external healthcare stakeholders.
• Indicator VI. Whether the company acts with integrity.


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The Younger You Are, The More Likely You’ll Post Or Research Health Questions On Twitter [Study]

The Younger You Are, The More Likely You’ll Post Or Research Health Questions On Twitter [Study] | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it
Have you ever posted on Twitter about a physical ailment or solicited feedback for a medical concern? If you’re between the ages of 18-24, you probably have!

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Social media for the healthcare industry: examples from MENA

Social media for the healthcare industry: examples from MENA | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it
Hospitals, clinics and pharmaceutical companies need effective social media strategies to thrive in this age.

 

The most challenging part of implementing a successful social media campaign is pulling in the relevant audience. Like in any other website, social media is driven by content.

It is common to find Twitter accounts without followers and Facebook pages without fans. You have to provide value to get value. Below are a few pointers on how to effectively do so.

 

Provide useful medical information


The internet is filled with medical advice from quacks. Consumers of such information can end up complicating their conditions further. Healthcare institutions can help bridge this gap by providing those in need with proper information and advice through social media.

 

You can provide simple solutions to common ailments and later follow up to determine the level of success. For complicated medical conditions, you can simply refer them to specialists in that field even though they do not belong to your organization.

This helps build trust and validates your noble intentions. You should never indulge in self promotion in the social media space. Users find it repulsive.

 

Social media enables you to have a one on one conversation with those seeking information. This builds your reputation and positions your institution as the go to source of reliable healthcare information.

 

This is the most effective way of marketing your products and services at almost no cost.

Social media can also bo effectively used to raise awareness about healthcare issues and be used to promote a health lifestyle.

 

For example, GE Healthcare's Get Fit social media competition on Twitter aimed to raise awarenss about cancer prevention and healthy living. The campaign elicited a strong response from the Middle East, with residents in Lebanon, Saudi Arabia and the UAE actively taking part to endorse a healthy lifestyle.

 

The GE global campaign took place as competition between different continents, where Twitter users simply tweeted what they were doing to to strive for a healthier lifestyle, with each tweet including a country-specific Get Fit hash tag.

The Get Fit website showed a map showing which continent generated the most 'healthy tweets'. The winning country in that continent (as determined by open vote) received a $20,000 donation to the Red Cross or Red Crescent society operating in that country.

 

Listen


Whether you like it or not, your clients are on social media and are talking about you. You can either choose to engage them or ignore them at your peril.

To successfully engage them, you first need to listen to what is being said about your organization and others in the industry.

 

This does not have to take too much time as there are apps that help you do this without too much of a hustle. There are many tools and specialists that can help you to track and analyze what is being said on Facebook, Twitter and other social media platforms.

Listening allows you to fashion your communication with your audience according to their needs. Most healthcare providers make the mistake of throwing information at people yet they are unaware of their needs.

 

Initiate conversation


Instead of waiting for your audience to initiate conversation it is most often prudent to do so yourself. Although your audience may have ideas and suggestions on how to improve your products and services they may not voice them unless prompted.

 

You can leverage the power of social media to get feedback on any new products, payment procedures, doctor reviews and any other issues.

During large scale disasters that require emergency medical response, a hospital can use social media to give the public updates on the status of the crisis. You can give hotlines for the public to call in case they are stranded, survival tips, number of casualties and any other relevant information.

You can also help people find their loved ones who may have been admitted at your facility. A pharmaceutical company can share information on new drugs to fight epidemics and tips on avoiding infection.

 

This will grow your influence among members of the online community as more people seek out and share the information you provide.

 

A good example of a healthcare brand actively engaging in conversation on social networks is skincare services company, Kaya Skin Clinic. The skin speclalist actively replies to queries on Facebook, resolving issues and there-by building strong relationships with customers.

 

Take action


The most important thing on social media is reputation. You should guard it at all costs. Be truthful always. If an issue is raised, make sure that you respond to it and act accordingly. Failure to keep your word can damage the reputation of any healthcare institution irreparably.

 

Check your social media accounts regularly for any requests or comments that may need immediate response. Hiring a dedicated resource to do so can be a good idea.

 

Involve employees


To make your foray into social media successful you have to involve all the employees. Make it a team sport and they will gladly contribute to the growth of your influence in the social media space.

 

At the end of the day, employees are people who relate with others on social media. By recruiting them as evangelists you can increase the likelihood of success in your social media campaign.


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Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Government Regulators and Social Media Guidelines… But were Afraid to Ask

Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Government Regulators and Social Media Guidelines… But were Afraid to Ask | Socialmedia8 | Scoop.it

Regulatory authorities have been working on social media guidelines for drug and device marketers for some time. These were due to be delivered at various times, most recently, by the end of the first quarter of 2011. Yet here we are, entering a new year, and the reality is that we may never receive explicit guidance from regulatory authorities on the use of social media.

 

To be fair, the rapidly shifting social media landscape makes it difficult – if not impossible – for regulatory bodies to produce meaningful guidelines that have any shelf life at all. Yet we are not flying entirely blind. While it is impossible to cover every situation and scenario in the incredibly dynamic space that IS social media, the aim of this article is to provide a sense of the types of questions pharmaceutical executives should be asking about what can and cannot be done with social media.

 

Social Media Defined

 

Step 1 is to agree on a definition for ‘social media.’ This is not easy because nearly everyone has an opinion about what the term means. The precise definition of ‘social media’ is not critical, but the key concept to bear in mind is this: ‘Social media’ does not refer to any individual site, such as Facebook or Twitter. Rather, it refers to any online media outlet, application or tool that allows people to collaborate and share information. Importantly, regulators have embraced this wider view of social media.

 

In general, social media sites encourage people to upload a profile containing information about themselves and allow users to share that information online with others. Social media encompasses a wide range of categories, including but not limited to, the following:

 

- Social Networking – e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Badoo, QQ, LinkedIn
- Social Bookmarking Sites – e.g., Delicious, Stumbleupon
- Social News Sites – e.g., Digg, Reddit
- Community Forums – e.g., CafePharma, qsrhelp.com, MDTF
- Social Wikis – e.g., Wikipedia, Intellipedia
- Blogging Sites – e.g., Blogspot, Blogster

 

Regulators care about what is being shared and where it can go once it leaves the creator’s fingertips. It’s about what you post AND where it ends up, geographically or demographically.

 

Why Social Media? ...


Via Thibaud Guymard
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