SocialGood
165 views | +0 today
Follow
SocialGood
using social media and technology for social change
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá
Scoop.it!

A Global Conversation to Join

A Global Conversation to Join | SocialGood | Scoop.it
In addition to expanding the global dialogue, we also need to expand access to technologies -- giving more people the tools that will help them shape their own destinies.


We live in a momentous time in history: The distance between the impossible and the possible is shrinking. Unprecedented technological capabilities combined with unlimited human creativity have given us tremendous power to take on intractable problems like poverty, unemployment, disease, and environmental degradation. Our challenge is to translate this extraordinary potential into meaningful change.


Examples of progress are all around us. Advances in technology have made it easier to deliver commodities to where they are needed. They've put medical services and information into the hands of patients and market information into the hands of farmers. And they've brought sustainable power solutions to communities not connected to an electric grid.

It's clear that technology is helping people - but even more important, it's empowering them to get things done in a way which was never imagined before, and giving them the chance to be heard.


I recently had the opportunity to participate in the Social Good Summit, a global conversation about how technology, social business and social media can help solve pressing challenges. Citizens in nearly 300 cities across six continents gathered in local meet ups to join the dialogue.


In Giza, Egypt, meet up organizers talked about how social media provides a venue for people to express their opinions and have them heard by thousands around the globe.

In Wellington, New Zealand, climate change activists discussed how communication technologies allow them to share what is happening on the ground in the Pacific Islands with the rest of the world.


In Mogadishu, Somalia, people discussed how social media fosters the exchange of ideas between those living in Somalia and the diaspora, as well as how it improves communications with the international community.


And in New York, where I participated, the discussion touched on everything from how mapping technologies are helping to fight polio to how digital technologies raise awareness for social good causes. Now social businesses are transforming people's lives in Bangladesh, Japan, Germany, France, Albania, Colombia and Haiti. They are demonstrating how human problems can be solved in business ways without expecting personal gain by the investors, how individuals and multi-national companies are coming forward to create social businesses.

Despite the different locations and languages, the key takeaway from these meetings was the same: People are hungry to be heard and today's technologies give them a voice in their local communities and in the world. Information and communication technologies allow us to share ideas and connect with each other, organize movements, talk to policymakers, access and spread information, and much more.


We need to harness these technologies to ensure that all voices, especially the voices of those directly impacted by global problems, are part of the dialogue. In my experience, this is essential to fully understanding our challenges and finding effective solutions. I began my career as an economics professor, but became frustrated because the economic theories I taught in the classroom didn't have any meaning in the lives of poor people I saw all around me. I decided to turn away from the textbooks and discover the real-life economics of a poor person's existence. Those personal stories have been an irreplaceable guide in my work to end poverty. Now, thanks to technology, it's easier than ever to make personal connections and learn firsthand about the problems we face.


In addition to expanding the global dialogue, we also need to expand access to technologies - giving more people the tools that will help them shape their own destinies. While Internet use has significantly grown in the past decade, currently only 24 percent of people in the developing world are online. Increasing Internet access in the years ahead is both a challenge and an opportunity.


While technology is important, it's what we do with it that truly matters. That's where the new concept of business called social business becomes so vitally important. Each of us has the ability to unleash our creativity to find solutions that lift up people and communities. The Social Good Summit was the start, not the end, of an important global dialogue on how we can bring about change. We must keep the conversation going in the months and years ahead. Visit "The Global Conversation" to join us. Together, let's envision the world we want, harness the tools we have, and make change happen.


Professor Muhammad Yunus is a Board Member of the United Nations Foundation, which is a co-host of the Social Good Summit.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá from SocialGoodBrasil
Scoop.it!

The Social Web Takes on Breast Cancer Awareness Month

The Social Web Takes on Breast Cancer Awareness Month | SocialGood | Scoop.it
This year, we've seen mobile apps, Facebook tributes and social network launches as tributes to Breast Cancer Awareness Month.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá
Scoop.it!

Deepak Chopra: Social Media is the Next Phase of Humanity [VIDEO]

Deepak Chopra: Social Media is the Next Phase of Humanity [VIDEO] | SocialGood | Scoop.it
Spirituality guru Deepak Chopra expresses true optimism for the good social media can bring to the world.


Deepak Chopra is a champion of the power of social media. The spiritual and cultural leader told the audience at the 2012 Social Good Summit that social media is an extension of society’s subconscious and is the inevitable next phase of humanity.


“Technology is our creation; we weren’t created by technology, so let’s use our creation to bring about a healing,” Chopra said. “At the most fundamental level, we are not just connected, we are inseparable.”


But harnessing the power of social media, to become something larger than just networking, Chopra said, is a choice for humanity to make — the world is still at a crossroads. Although he said technology itself is neutral, he espoused a message of hope, saying that if harnessed for good, technology could lead the world to a place of good and produce a united solution for the challenges of the world.


“What drones can’t do, what the armies can’t do, what the weapons can’t do, what the weapons of mass destruction can’t do, what biological warfare can’t do — we can do through technology to heal the world,” Chopra said.


SEE ALSO: Deepak Chopra: Spirituality in The Age of Social Media


While he is bullish on the power of digital to unite people, Chopra remains confident that social media will never be a substitute for true relationships, imagination and human creativity. Computers, he feels, are only mathematical algorithms, but people thrive on emotion.


“You can never program true intelligence into a computer,” Chopra said.


But despite social media itself lacking true human feeling, Chopra said, it is still a medium that can work to bring even enemies together. All it takes is working to create hope, trust, stability, compassion and respect in our shared online space.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá from Presença Digital Relevante
Scoop.it!

Overheard and Understood at Social Good Summit Day 2 By Aaron Sherinian

Overheard and Understood at Social Good Summit Day 2 By Aaron Sherinian | SocialGood | Scoop.it
Aaron Sherinian is a communicator, dad, and global PR guy inspired by the fascinating people and places in his life.


Sometimes you don’t have to eavesdrop to hear what’s going on in conversations around you.  In fact, sometimes you are invited in.  This took place both online and offline today during Social Good Summit Day 2, and I am grateful I got the chance to hear, and engage, in some great exchanges.


Here are a few of the gems I heard, overheard, and helped expand during conversations today:


*   A tool by any other name…  It seems like our new media world is pumping out new platforms every day.  We have a lot more out our disposal in terms of communications tools than ever before.  But over and over again today, we heard that it’s not about the tools, it’s what you do with them.  During a conversation between a digital strategist and a producer from a national TV broadcaster, it was clear that social media wasn’t enough to drive traffic to particular stories.  It was the blend of compelling content and a deliberative strategy on how to use individual tools and blend them together that is making for improved conversations and increased viewership.


*   More is more. When it comes to conversations, more is more. It’s a favorite maxim of mine, and in this case it seemed to be coming from every corner of the Social Good Summit.  Bringing more people into the conversation is what helps create social good and prevents a select few from dominating a conversation, or limiting what we can do with it.  On two occasions I found myself in a conversation listening to people talk about the need to “build community” rather than just “run campaigns.”  From an breakfast with online moms to a chat with a community organizer and a COO, I heard about the need to find more people, make more connections, engender more trust, and see more results over a longer period of time through sustained online movements.

 


*   Risk is risk and it’s not all bad.  While it was a very public conversation, I loved listening to the conversation with Amb. Susan Rice and Pete Cashmore.  They underlined something that I overheard on a few occasions during the day when it comes to living up to the potential of social media.  We’re not always eager to try something new, but by forcing ourselves to think, act, and engage differently via social media, we find that we adopt, adapt, and can advance at a faster pace.  Social media tools aren’t the replacement for smart communications and authentic engagement, but they do allow for us to experiment faster than every before.

By far, my most favorite thing to hear during Social Good Summit Day 2, was the phrase, “I’m so happy to see you.”  While plenty of people are posting and pinning and following people on their timelines every day, “offline moments” like this among the digitally connected generation are some of the best.



What did you overhear during Day 2?  Let us eavesdrop and learn!


http://globalextrovert.com/overheard-and-understood-at-social-good-summit-day-2/



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá
Scoop.it!

Big Opportunities for Big Ideas - Social Good Summit

Big Opportunities for Big Ideas - Social Good Summit | SocialGood | Scoop.it
Aaron Sherinian is a communicator, dad, and global PR guy inspired by the fascinating people and places in his life.


Yesterday’s kick-off of the Social Good Summit was a buffet of great ideas and inspiration. The people on the stage were incredible, but what happened inside and outside the room made it remarkable. A friend of mine remarked, “This place is like a power-list of people who believe in progress.” Agreed.

While the overall theme of the Summit is to find ways to connect technology, social media and innovation for social good, there were some sub-themes that I saw emerge. Here are some rough notes from what I heard, read and felt yesterday.

* DATA, BIG MATTERS, BUT WHY?: Big data is exciting, but what we do with it matters. We need to be using data with a purpose; data-driven decision making; data is not an end; data needs application, analysis and innovation to be useful for impact and social good.

* TECH TO THE MAX: This is our time in history to use tech to the max; it doesn’t always have to be about new technology – we have an opportunity innovate & use same tech in new, better ways as well.

* PEOPLE NOT JUST PLATFORMS: It’s not just about platforms, but the way we interact with people to make them work. We need to look at how platforms are one to one, one to many, many to one; data can’t heal a broken bone…people can.

* TOP DOWN AND (not or) BOTTOM UP: Social media’s power isn’t always coming from the bottom-up, and we need to be alert that rights are respected and encourage transparency about what people in power (at all levels) are doing with social media.

I look forward to another great day of ideas and digital, global action at the Social Good Summit. What were your takeaways from Day 1 — and what can I be on the lookout for you from Day 2?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá from SocialGoodBrasil
Scoop.it!

Social Good Brasil : the Seminar , November, 6th, 7th and 8th

Social Good Brasil : the Seminar , November,  6th, 7th and 8th | SocialGood | Scoop.it

Amigos, estao todos super convidados.Corram lá e se inscrevam for FREE nesse evento inédito no Brasil :-)...


www.socialgoodbrasil.org.br 




more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá from Social Good Brazil
Scoop.it!

Becoming a Networked Nonprofit (SSIR)

Becoming a Networked Nonprofit (SSIR) | SocialGood | Scoop.it
Redesigning your nonprofit organization to become more participatory, open, authentic, decentralized, collective, and effective—via social media, networks, and beyond.

Via SocialGoodBrasil
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá from Measuring the Networked Nonprofit
Scoop.it!

Measuring Thought Leadership

Measuring Thought Leadership | SocialGood | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org


Influences means a couple of different things.  You can measure other people's influence - as part of identifying champions or super fans or you can measure your own influence or organization's as part of a goal to have "thought leadership." 


This is a vanity metric - and there are several tools you can use to measure it.  This Infographic shows some of them.


Most important bit is the how to:


If you are really interested in taking advantage of your social influence score, it’s not enough checking your level every now and then. You’ll have to act.


What follows are the steps to develop a successful action plan according to Brian Solis (new media analyst at The Altimer Group) :


Track performances against current benchmarks that capture existing sentiments, behaviours and awareness.


Define who is your target audience.


Develop the strategy. You’ll find here the difference with the classic social media campaigns: you’ll have to take into account both your community and all your community’s followers. Find out what does matter to them and use that info in your daily content.
Determine who are your most influential followers and use them in order to improve your social media campaign. If they are engaged, they will help you with no doubt. This is the time to use the digital social influence tools.
Launch the campaign: do not forget these kind of activities take place in real time. Key influencers’ behaviours are totally unexpected. That is the reason the next step is crucial.
Measure constantly. Monitor everything every day of the campaign and modify the strategy when needed.




Via Beth Kanter
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá from Social Good Brazil
Scoop.it!

SocialBlood : Connecting People by Blood Type on Facebook and Sean Parker's Advice for Them

SocialBlood : Connecting People by Blood Type on Facebook and Sean Parker's Advice for Them | SocialGood | Scoop.it
Socialblood.Org, an India based Startup is on a mission to connect the entire Facebook population of over 800 million users to their blood types.

...


Via SocialGoodBrasil
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá
Scoop.it!

Good Works! Your practical guide to corporate good initiatives - Simon Mainwaring recommendation

Good Works! Your practical guide to corporate good initiatives - Simon Mainwaring recommendation | SocialGood | Scoop.it

I liked this post from Simon Mainwaring, about the book Good Works, and decided to share with you.


It’s rare to find a book that is equal parts inspiring and practical. Good Works! by Phillip Kotler, David Hessekiel, and Nancy Lee is that rare read that shows you just how much is possible as an individual and a corporation, and what real value that can add to your business and our world.

It’s no surprise that We First believes that brand purpose is now a core business imperative, but Good Works!makes the business case for these initiates based on dozens of case studies that include GE, J&J, AT&T, Macy’s, P&G, Fedex, Coca-Cola and beyond. In doing so they clearly illustrate how business can do good in alignment with its company’s core values, so that such efforts reinforce the brand narrative while also doing good.

Not surprising, any brand contemplating such a move wants to know the benefit to them, and that where the book is so useful. The authors clearly demonstrate how good works inspire customer engagement that builds reputation, spire loyalty and drives sales, whether those good works involve employee volunteering or consumer donations. It also does this with a healthy blend of optimism and advice for the cynics, explaining why certain initiates fail and others succeed as a function of your motives.

What I like most is how the authors tease out the various ways that business can do good,  from maing a contribution, to donating employee time, to getting their own house in order to temper the negative externalities of their own business practices.

Good Works! is a must read for corporate officers (whether innovation, HR or leadership officers) seeking to ensure brand relevance, reputation and sales. This is real world intelligence that can empower a brand to embrace its best self and in so doing, inspire its employees and customers to grow its business by building a better world.

You can order Good Works! here and follow author David Hessekiel here.


The original post : http://simonmainwaring.com/brands/good-works-your-practical-guide-to-corporate-good-initiatives/






more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá from Measuring the Networked Nonprofit
Scoop.it!

Amazon.com: Measuring the Networked Nonprofit: Using Data to Change the World (9781118137604): Beth Kanter, Katie Delahaye Paine: Books

Measuring the Networked Nonprofit: Using Data to Change the World

~ Katie Delahaye Paine (author) More about this product
List Price: $34.95
Price: $22.14
You Save: $12.81 (37%)

Já encomendei na Amazon o livro da Beth Kanter que promete ser muito útil para organizações sem fins lucrativos.


Dia 7 de novembro a Beth estará conosco em Florianópolis para o seminário Internacional Social Good Brasil.

Quer nos acompanhar para saber mais sobre o seminário?

Curta o http://www.facebook.com/SocialGoodBrasil !    



Measuring the Networked Nonprofit: Using Data to Change the World [Beth Kanter, Katie Delahaye Paine] on Amazon.com. 


Via Beth Kanter
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá
Scoop.it!

Como o Pete Cashmore começou o Mashable

Como o Pete Cashmore começou o Mashable | SocialGood | Scoop.it
Um artigo da jornalista Jennifer Preston no NY Times, a propósito da conferência Social Good Summit que ocorreu em Manhattan fala sobre o percurso de Pete Cashmore, o fundador do Mashable, o maior blog sobre tecnologia actualmente.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá from EPIC Infographic
Scoop.it!

Social Media for Social Good [INFOGRAPHIC]

Social Media for Social Good [INFOGRAPHIC] | SocialGood | Scoop.it

In an infographic by MPA@UNC, they profile several successful grassroots and nonprofit campaigns, explain tactics that increase the impact of a message, and explore emerging trends in charitable giving and volunteering.


Via Jonha Richman
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá
Scoop.it!

Social Entrepreneurism - Muhammad Yunus at Social Good Summit - English

Social Entrepreneurism - Muhammad Yunus at Social Good Summit - English | SocialGood | Scoop.it

Wonderful and inspiring for all of us who would like to learn more about Social Good and Social Business! 


The video is 13 minutes only : http://new.livestream.com/Mashable/SGS/videos/4024092


Hope you love it! 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá
Scoop.it!

Thinking about “Scale” and “To What End?” By Aaron Sherinian

Thinking about “Scale” and “To What End?” By Aaron Sherinian | SocialGood | Scoop.it
Aaron Sherinian is a communicator, dad, and global PR guy inspired by the fascinating people and places in his life.


Today was the final day of the 2012 Social Good Summit.  As hoped, it ended with a bang.  First there was the announcement that the event had broken a record for the world’s largest conversation on a single day on a global issue.  There was national and global trending on Twitter.  Big name power-players and stars came through the door and connections between 200 locations around the world made this a large convening at a new scale.  But through most of the day I kept hearing the words of a mentor, a leader in the PR and global issues space, who reminded me that every time something is BIG, you should always remind yourself “to what end?”  Why are we creating noise, or engagement, or interaction?

There were 3 moments today when the questions of “Scale” and the question of “To What End?” came together and taught me important lessons:


–We learned today that a group of people in Myanmar wanted desperately to share their findings
and results from their meet-up over the weekend but didn’t have enough broadband to upload the video.  So they put the file on a transport so that it could be sent from Thailand.  It was important for them that their message be heard around the planet as part of this global gathering.  Having their voice on the world stage brought them legitimacy and helped spur accountability and ensure transparency.  They had the end in mind.  Their actions were on a major scale, and the goal was clear.  They achieved it, and we shared their video for the world as part of the final session.


–After the session with Mira Sorvino last night on how social media can help combat human trafficking, we learned that a woman felt empowered enough to tweet in the details of this crime happening at that very moment.  While I don’t know all the details (and cannot share more than this to respect the safety of the person in question), the immediate chain reaction this put in place showed how a big conversation with the general public (on a very big scale) can lead to a very personal result.  ”To what end?” in this case, was helping a woman find help via social media when she was unable to find it safely from those around her.


–During a Skype chat with a group of influencers in Yerevan, Armenia, I was reminded that very big change can take place when we use social media on a very local level.  While the conversation started with problems like global health, combating poverty, and social justice, the discussion was just as meaningful when we were talking about how to use social media to motivate local leaders to improve services as basic as garbage collection.  The question of “to what end?” was easily answered.  The goal was to improve life in a local community, and let local leaders know that the discussion was taking place.  All these were important issues, and while the scale of some of the issues were global, the local problems were just as real – and the solutions just as exciting.


So as all of us look at how to leverage social media to take our voices and our actions to a global scale, the question of “to what end?” is just as important as “how big can we go?”  This week’s summit has reminded me of this important lesson…one that we all can take to scale.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá
Scoop.it!

Something Happened Last Night…

Something Happened Last Night… | SocialGood | Scoop.it
Aaron Sherinian is a communicator, dad, and global PR guy inspired by the fascinating people and places in his life.


...and in a lot of ways your world just changed. Everybody’s did.

I don’t usually share emails/blogs in this sort of a way, but it’s what’s truly on my mind right now, and I want you all to be part of this thinking, which started with my team at the UN Foundation and should extend to everyone participating in this global conversation.


If you couldn’t sleep last night, I hope you were part of the SGS global conversation, it was worth it. A conversation got underway that, whether you know it or not, you are a part of. And it’s made me take a step back and think about what this blog means for us as people who care about the world, who care about helping the UN, and who care about other people and the power of communications.


When our parents were born, nobody had the power to unite in real-time like this around a cause for good. Armies or governments (for some pretty ugly purposes at times) could do it eventually, broadcast television helped do it on a 1-way basis, and only a few telephone lines could bring together a select few. But just a few partners, with some really good friends and a long-term view of what new media is about to do to our world, can make it happen in September 2012. Not one way “push” of info, but a dialogue with people outside their borders…in some places where dialogue has been a precious commodity for many years.

I was listening in and watching some of the feedback from the list of conversations underway right now as part of the global conversation:

Madrid. Tokyo. Tirana. Mogadishu. Beijing. Islamabad. Montenegro.
Karachi. Lahore. Jakarta. Cyprus. Yerevan. Mogadishu.


The people in these conversations are living in places where there are real issues – tough issues – that need to be discussed. And they are starting to hear from people in faraway places to expose things that need to be changed, share how they are doing it, and crowdsource the next steps. This is very big. It broadens the reach of the issues, and puts the world on notice that all this matters, and cannot be explained or excused away. No woman or man can say they didn’t know about it. And very few can say they didn’t have a chance to be part. And the ripple effect will help us bring in more voices that should be part of the discussion.


It’s the start of a new day in New York City. And for me, when I walked out that door this morning, it was into a new way of thinking about how a group of communicators can engage with that planet of ours.

We are all building something big. It’s the start of a new day.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá
Scoop.it!

Reflections from Stanford Nonprofit Management Institute: New Skills for a Complex World

Reflections from Stanford Nonprofit Management Institute:  New Skills for a Complex World | SocialGood | Scoop.it
“New Skills for a Complex World” was the theme of the seventh annual Nonprofit Management Institute, a two-day conference for several hundred nonprofit leaders sponsored by the Stanford Social Innovation Review and...
more...
Beth Kanter's comment, September 16, 2012 2:01 PM
Thanks for re-rescooping this post!!
Rescooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá from Practical Networked Leadership Skills
Scoop.it!

The Unanticipated Benefits of Content Curation: Reducing Overload

The Unanticipated Benefits of Content Curation: Reducing Overload | SocialGood | Scoop.it
The Unanticipated Benefits of Content Curation   View more presentations from Beth Kanter Yesterday, I did a free NTEN Webinar called "The Unanticipated Benefits of Content Curation: Reducing Information Overload" based on my feature article in the...

Via Beth Kanter
more...
Heather Card's curator insight, March 26, 2013 11:14 AM

Non-profits can help their constituents sort through the clutter. Discipline is needed!

Rescooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá from Measuring the Networked Nonprofit
Scoop.it!

Networked Nonprofits Collect, Analyze, and Apply Social Data To Organizational Decisions

Networked Nonprofits Collect, Analyze, and Apply Social Data To Organizational Decisions | SocialGood | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org


This is the second reference I've stumbled upon that talks about social media tracking/monitoring and metrics as "social data."   This is great reframing in the context of Networked Nonprofits - and measuring their activity. 


Here's the bit that caught my eye:


Whether it be for learning when is the best time to tweet for your audience or keywords that bring traffic to your website, data can be used in some form or another to influence communication strategy (including future social efforts), improve customer service (including resolving complaints), inform product development and understand consumer interests, habits and behavior.


In order for this to happen with nonprofits:


(1)  They already need to have a "data-informed" culture

(2)  They need foundational skills in collecting, analyzing, and applying social data.  This could be:

a)  Brand Monitoring

b)  Influencer Research
c)  KPI/Metrics to track performance of content on different channels, plus content analysis

 

Most importantly,  there needs to be someone on staff who is responsible for the task beyond a quick hit of looking a monthly spreadsheet.  Should also be an organizational process, given priority and importance. 


How does your nonprofit think about "social data" in the context of collecting data, sense-making, and applying it to decisions.


Via Beth Kanter
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá from Social Good Brasil - Español
Scoop.it!

Facebook, una de las redes sociales que se utilizan para la educación.

Facebook, una de las redes sociales que se utilizan para la educación. | SocialGood | Scoop.it
pizarroncosmico.netai.net/?p=103 (Facebook, una de las redes sociales que se utilizan para la educación http://t.co/834PXQ1t...)...

Via SocialGoodBrasil
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá from Social Good Brazil
Scoop.it!

Top 10 Social Media Campaigns for Social Good | Brave One Agency

Top 10 Social Media Campaigns for Social Good | Brave One Agency | SocialGood | Scoop.it

Social media has blossomed from a simple channel for connecting with friends to a widely used and effective marketing tool. This has given social platforms considerable power to impact the greater good. Through applications such as Facebook, Twitter, and Foursquare, companies are taking advantage of this movement to further their goals of social good.


Via SocialGoodBrasil
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá from Sustainable Futures
Scoop.it!

Shareable: How Big Tech is Sharing for Social Good

Shareable: How Big Tech is Sharing for Social Good | SocialGood | Scoop.it

For decades, corporate leaders have been dabbling in philanthropy and corporate social responsibility, with mixed results. We all know that once Corporation X earns Y amount of money, they ought to launch a foundation and start giving back. Right?

 

Well, luckily, we now have a strong wave of corporate intrapreneurs that understand the business case for sustainability. Instead of making money from polluting and then giving a few dollars to re-plant trees, corporate leaders are paying attention to planet, people, and profit within their business. However, finding the right recycled paper, solar-powered servers, fair trade makers, and so on, can be daunting!


Via Flora Moon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá from Content and Curation for Nonprofits
Scoop.it!

What Curators Need: Finding More Of What They Are Interested In - Technology Forecast

What Curators Need: Finding More Of What They Are Interested In - Technology Forecast | SocialGood | Scoop.it

Mais uma ótima dica dos super Robin Good e Beth Kanter 


Another great find from Robin Good

 

In issue 3 of PwC’s Tech Forecast there is a great video illustrating what is going to change in the near future when it comes to finding the right information.

 

"The Navigational phase of online information is just now emerging.

 

Within three to five years, finding more of the information we need--not to mention opportunities for more effective collaboration--will become possible. Social tools will help."

 

The animated video explains how making network and interest-based connections more visible will allow easier and more effective filtering and navigation of information spaces in the near future. 

 

Insightful. 8/10


Watch the video here:  http://www.pwc.com/us/en/technology-forecast/2011/issue3/index.jhtml 


Via Robin Good, Beth Kanter
more...
Beth Kanter's comment, January 8, 2012 2:55 PM
Fantastic find! Thank you as always
Scooped by Fernanda Bornhausen Sá
Scoop.it!

The power of technology and social media for social change cases

Presentation for Synergos Fellows about the power of technology and social media for social good with cases Charity Water, Alex lemonade and Sammer and Vinay (...
more...
No comment yet.