Social Deviance
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The Early Years of Joseph Stalin

The Early Years of Joseph Stalin | Social Deviance | Scoop.it
The Early Years of Joseph Stalin - Exploring Stalin's violent and abusive childhood, his early revolutionary leanings, and the causes of his later cruelty.
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George Zimmerman and Weaponized Racism - RollingStone.com

George Zimmerman and Weaponized Racism - RollingStone.com | Social Deviance | Scoop.it
RollingStone.com
George Zimmerman and Weaponized Racism
RollingStone.com
In the aftermath of George Zimmerman's acquittal for slaying Trayvon Martin, America is engaged in another anguished conversation about race.
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Bestiality brothels are 'spreading through Germany' warns campaigner as abusers turn to sex with animals as 'lifestyle choice'

Bestiality brothels are 'spreading through Germany' warns campaigner as abusers turn to sex with animals as 'lifestyle choice' | Social Deviance | Scoop.it
Animal protection officer Madeleine Martin said that current laws were not protecting animals from predatory zoophililes, and the problem of 'erotic zoos' is getting worse. (Wow.
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LEGISLATURE : Bill seeks end to spousal support for child abusers - Press-Enterprise

LEGISLATURE : Bill seeks end to spousal support for child abusers - Press-Enterprise | Social Deviance | Scoop.it
Press-Enterprise LEGISLATURE : Bill seeks end to spousal support for child abusers Press-Enterprise SACRAMENTO — Carol Abar, of Riverside, paid her ex-husband $22,000 in spousal support before he went to jail after pleading guilty to unlawful...
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It happens to battered spouses too. I know a woman who worked 80 hours per week to support her abuser, who chose to be a "stay at home father." His idea of childcare entailled making his daughter stay upstairs in her room. He eventually tried to kill his wife for insurance money. After she escaped, he received a slap on the wrists, then he proceeded to stalk her. Imagine her surprise when the divorce lawyer told her she may get stuck paying alimony to him because she had supported him for years during the marriage.

 

Anyone in a similar situation needs a really good lawyer as well as a domestic violence advocate to help them through the tangled web of getting a divorce. This woman was "lucky." She didn't end up paying alimony. It has been 4 years since the divorce was finalized .Her ex has never stopped stalking her.

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How Predators, including Sexual Trap You, Asserting Rights When They Want to Exploit Victims

How Predators, including Sexual  Trap You, Asserting Rights When They Want to Exploit Victims | Social Deviance | Scoop.it
Criminal Minds - Predator Profiles help you "know your enemy" to better escape his trap.

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Exclusive 'Criminal Minds' Interview: Joe Mantegna on Shocking Season Finale ... - BuddyTV

Exclusive 'Criminal Minds' Interview: Joe Mantegna on Shocking Season Finale ... - BuddyTV | Social Deviance | Scoop.it
BuddyTV
Exclusive 'Criminal Minds' Interview: Joe Mantegna on Shocking Season Finale ...
BuddyTV
This has not been an easy season for the profilers on CBS' procedural hit Criminal Minds. Reid saw his love killed before his eyes.
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Empathy, Misbehavior, and Developing a Conscience

Empathy, Misbehavior, and Developing a Conscience | Social Deviance | Scoop.it

Nancy Eisenberg’s article on helping children develop their natural tendencies for empathy touches on issues addressed in three or four of my pieces in this column in the past five years. Though the columns in question have addressed empathy in a variety of ways, the thread is the same: there are actions—easily accomplished actions—we can take in our schools that can help children grow up with a disposition to be aware of others and sensitive to their needs.

The “king” of empathy studies and translating them to the public is Martin Hoffman, whose book Empathy and Moral Development (Cambridge, 2000) is a valuable resource for educators and parents alike. Certainly Hoffman would agree with Nancy Eisenberg’s eight suggestions in this newsletter (he cites her research at several points in his book), but the action he clearly stresses above others entails pointing out the consequences of actions and trying to understand others’ feelings.


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18 Attributes of Highly Effective Liars

18 Attributes of Highly Effective Liars | Social Deviance | Scoop.it

Niccolò Machiavelli might well have titled his 16th-century Dell’arte Della Guerra (" The Art of War ") as The Art of Lying, since verbal deception—mainly, how to get away with it—was so central to his political psychology. To say that the exquisitely light-of-tongue are "talented" is, of course, sure to be met with moral outrage. We place a social premium on the ability to ferret out other people’s lies, especially, as we’ve seen just this week in the news, when they may hide brutal and ugly crimes.  

 

Still, there is something darkly fascinating about those skilled in verbal legerdemain. And at least one team of scientists, led by Dutch psychologistAldert Vrij , believes that it has identified the precise ingredients of "good liars." 


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, May 26, 2013 5:35 PM

A research psychologist's curious look at human behaviour.

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Unexpected Truths About Liars and Lying

Unexpected Truths About Liars and Lying | Social Deviance | Scoop.it
Modern "social" life is ripe for temptation so it's especially helpful to recognize some myths and counterintuitive truths about lying. Just keep in mind our self-deception.

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Social Control | JustSimpleDiary

Social Control. Focusing on non-criminal deviance, we all engage in certain deviants acts . . Acts that violate certain social norms. How have you exhibited non-criminal deviance and what responses did you receive?

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Dr. Phil.com - Advice - Fourteen Characteristics of a Serial Killer

Dr. Phil.com - Advice - Fourteen Characteristics of a Serial Killer | Social Deviance | Scoop.it

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Wow: Man Stages Girl’s Kidnapping To ‘Be The Hero,’ But Then This Happened… | Mediaite

Wow: Man Stages Girl’s Kidnapping To ‘Be The Hero,’ But Then This Happened… | Mediaite | Social Deviance | Scoop.it
File this one in the awful category: A man lured a 15-year-old girl, sought to stage her kidnapping and rescue in an effort to be a hero, and accidentally killed her, according to reports.
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The Trayvon Martin Case: Thoughts about Law Enforcement, Civil Rights, and Justice.

The Trayvon Martin Case: Thoughts about Law Enforcement, Civil Rights, and Justice. | Social Deviance | Scoop.it
I received an interesting response to my tweet regarding the Zimmerman verdict. It reminded me how easily social media posts are misread. The original conversation is on my twitter feed, but this i...
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'Thank you:' Cleveland kidnapping victims speak out for the first time - CNN

'Thank you:' Cleveland kidnapping victims speak out for the first time - CNN | Social Deviance | Scoop.it
'Thank you:' Cleveland kidnapping victims speak out for the first time
CNN
Gina DeJesus was 14 when she was kidnapped in 2004. She says to the public, "thank you for the support." Amanda Berry ....
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Stalked On LinkedIn: Victims Complain They Can't Block Abusers - AOL Jobs

Stalked On LinkedIn: Victims Complain They Can't Block Abusers - AOL Jobs | Social Deviance | Scoop.it
Stalked On LinkedIn: Victims Complain They Can't Block Abusers
AOL Jobs
Have you been stalked on LinkedIn? LinkedIn is a great place to find a job, but as some users have learned, it can also be a great place to be found -- by a stalker.

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"It is the deviants among us who hold society together." Paradox animation by Dalton Conley

Paradox Animation about social deviance and social control from the 3rd Edition of Dalton Conley's book, You May Ask Yourself: An Introduction to Thinking Li...

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Beware — serial killers loose on broadcast TV

Beware — serial killers loose on broadcast TV | Social Deviance | Scoop.it

The CW's 'Cult' and Fox's 'The Following' are new network television shows about murderers. There's reason to be concerned about the trend.

 

In an alarming bit of synchronicity, or what some might call a lack of cultural imagination, two new series premiering on network television nearly within a month will revolve around serial killings, and serial killings by proxy: "Cult," which begins Feb. 19 on the CW, and the similarly titled "The Following," which starts Monday on Fox. BBC America's period procedural "Ripper Street," meanwhile, began its eight-episode run Saturday not with the Jack but a murderer — if such a comparative may be allowed — even more distasteful. And NBC has "Hannibal," concerning the early days of Thomas Harris' cannibal killer, on its docket for a date to be announced.

This is nothing new. We are in Season 8 of CBS' "Criminal Minds," a weekly cavalcade of just such intricately devised horrors whose viewership has hovered pretty consistently between 12 million and 14 million, with its ranking improving as the overall size of the broadcast audience has shrunk; it is a palpable hit. And there is "Dexter," on Showtime, whose protagonist serially murders serial murderers.

At the recent Television Critics Assn. press conclave in Pasadena, where TV violence was a hot subject in the wake of the Newtown, Conn., school shooting, CBS Entertainment President Nina Tassler and NBC Entertainment Chairman Bob Greenblatt — a Showtime executive when "Dexter" was born — were called on to defend their series.

 

Each stood behind the product. Greenblatt defended "Dexter" by saying it isn't as violent as "Criminal Minds." Tassler defended "Criminal Minds" as something meant for adults, and a show she likes. (Former star Mandy Patinkin, by contrast, told New York magazine awhile back that the series was "the biggest public mistake I ever made.... I never thought they were going to kill and rape all these women every night, every day, week after week, year after year.")

What is it about these characters that bothers me so?

They are supposed to bother us, of course, on the way to providing some sort of entertainment. (Perhaps it's the "entertainment" that's my problem.) Partly, it's that in spite of all the pathologies and florid particulars with which their creators dress them and the complicated manners of killing they devise for them, they are tediously alike. Partly it is that, being deviant, they have nothing much to tell us about ourselves or the world — there may be more serial killers about than we think, but there are fewer than we imagine — and partly it's the way that they are glamorized.

I understand that terror has its uses and am not averse to a bit of frightful catharsis; too much decorum in our shared fantasies can be as unhealthful as too little. Nor do I believe that, in a general way, violence in entertainment makes violent people; indeed, some studies have suggested quite the opposite. (A 2010 study from Texas A&M suggested, for instance, that "violent games reduce depression and hostile feelings in players through mood management.")

But it does create violence in the culture, in the social air we commonly breathe, and objections to it should not be dismissed merely because it can't be tied to a particular real-world act or because most of us are smart enough to tell the difference between fantasy and reality.

I recognize, as well, that great art has been made on this theme: "M," "Monsieur Verdoux," "The Night of the Hunter," "Peeping Tom," "Badlands" (a murder-spree story, technically), even that comedy chestnut "Arsenic and Old Lace." There is violence in Homer and Shakespeare, and, Lord knows, there is violence in the Bible — both the fire and brimstone of the Old Testament and the feel-His-pain torments of the New. Dante was a great inventor of tortures. But we are talking about somewhat lower horizons here.

 

In most popular fictions, the serial killer is often not just smart but brilliant: almost psychically sensitive to their opponents and prey, able to play the game 10 moves ahead. These figures are self-styled übermenschen (they are usuallymenschen), typically with an "artistic" bent. "He didn't just eviscerate 14 female students," Kevin Bacon's reactivated FBI agent says of James Purefoy's Poe-obsessed serial killer (and leader of serial killers) in "The Following," "he was making art."

Created by Kevin Williamson ("Scream," "Dawson's Creek"), "The Following," in which an imprisoned serial killer marshals an army of like-minded murderers, multiplying the effect, does seem to represent some sort of watershed for network TV. Its survival relies on the survival of its villain and, therefore, the continued failure of its hero, and an unending stream of variations on the central ritual — the stalking, the torture, the killing. ("Cult," a kind of meta-series about a show-within-the-show called "Cult," feels somewhat less gruesome for being more mysterious.) The success of "Criminal Minds" notwithstanding, and the many hands that had to sign contracts and checks to bring it to life, it strikes me as an odd, sad plan for a television show, at least in the framework of network broadcast TV.

As I never tire of pointing out, broadcast is not cable. It legally requires accountability, and not only to the stockholders and profit-takers of the large corporations that squat there and treat the frequencies they have been merely licensed to use as their actual property. When something airs there, it's as if it were being projected in a public square, and it is weak to argue that you can just avoid that square if you don't like it, when it is your square as much as anyone's.

 

The oft-heard claim from broadcasters that they need to be able to compete with cable, where things can be darker and more explicit, is weak. Their profits are not the people's concern; indeed, all the responsibility lies with the broadcasters, who are mandated to serve the public good, which is not exactly the same as giving the people what they want.

I don't mean to suggest any kind of censorship, only a plea for the self-reflection that money tends to crowd out. And just as we should be able to discuss the gun problem without their makers and admirers digging in their feet like obstreperous children, we should be able to talk about violent entertainments without their makers and admirers suggesting that their 1st Amendment rights or the sanctity of their first-person-shooter video games, their Dario Argento and "Saw" DVDs, is under attack.

For the generations who grew up on Freddie and Jason and Leatherface and the slasher films from whose conventions Williamson fashioned "Scream," and those who grew up on Quentin Tarantino's hyperbolic remakes of an even earlier generation's bloody fun, this may all seem a tempest in a teapot made from a human skull. There have been national panics before, after all, over this sort of thing — horror comics were once thought to signal the end of civilization, which was more or less functioning when last seen. We find amusingly quaint the terrors of olden days.

Every passing season sets a new level of tolerance for such things. Is raising that bar a worthwhile pursuit? Exactly what sort of glory attaches to being the person who topped "The Human Centipede"?

"Stop me before I kill again," goes the familiar phrase. It isn't likely, but it's worth a thought.

 


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The Anatomy of Violence: The Biological Roots of Crime (by Adrian Raine)

The Anatomy of Violence: The Biological Roots of Crime

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Why do some innocent kids grow up to become cold-blooded serial killers? Is bad biology partly to blame? For more than three decades Adrian Raine has been researching the biological roots of violence and establishing neurocriminology, a new field that applies neuroscience techniques to investigate the causes and cures of crime. In The Anatomy of Violence, Raine dissects the criminal mind with a fascinating, readable, and far-reaching scientific journey into the body of evidence that reveals the brain to be a key culprit in crime causation.
 
Raine documents from genetic research that the seeds of sin are sown early in life, giving rise to abnormal physiological functioning that cultivates crime. Drawing on classical case studies of well-known killers in history—including Richard Speck, Ted Kaczynski, and Henry Lee Lucas—Raine illustrates how impairments to brain areas controlling our ability to experience fear, make good decisions, and feel guilt predispose us to violence. He contends that killers can actually be coldhearted: something as simple as a low resting heart rate can give rise to violence. But arguing that biology is not destiny, he also sketches out provocative new biosocial treatment approaches that can change the brain and prevent violence.
 
Finally, Raine tackles the thorny legal and ethical dilemmas posed by his research, visualizing a futuristic brave new world where our increasing ability to identify violent offenders early in life might shape crime-prevention policies, for good and bad. Will we sacrifice our notions of privacy and civil rights to identify children as potential killers in the hopes of helping both offenders and victims? How should we punish individuals with little to no control over their violent behavior? And should parenting require a license? The Anatomy of Violence offers a revolutionary appraisal of our understanding of criminal offending, while also raising provocative questions that challenge our core human values of free will, responsibility, and punishment.

 

 


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Abscence of Conscience, Sense of Right and Wrong, Morals/Ethics - Psychopathic Personality

Abscence of Conscience, Sense of Right and Wrong, Morals/Ethics - Psychopathic Personality | Social Deviance | Scoop.it
We are all familiar with the likes of, John Wayne Gacy, Gary Gilmore, Jeffrey Dahmer, and Ted Bundy; to name a few.

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Why liars are so difficult to sniff out - Mother Nature Network

Why liars are so difficult to sniff out - Mother Nature Network | Social Deviance | Scoop.it
Mother Nature Network
Why liars are so difficult to sniff out
Mother Nature Network
"This represents a more promising approach, because it makes the behavioral differences between liars and truth-tellers more noticeable," Hartwig told LiveScience.
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Good News for Liars - Slate Magazine

Good News for Liars - Slate Magazine | Social Deviance | Scoop.it
Slate Magazine
Good News for Liars
Slate Magazine
As far as detecting actual lies, however, polygraphs produce too many false positives—that is, they mistake too many truthful people for liars.
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Top 10 Cults

Top 10 Cults | Social Deviance | Scoop.it
Cult roughly refers to a cohesive social group devoted to beliefs or practices that the surrounding culture considers outside the mainstream, with a notably positive or negative popular perception.

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» Introduction to Sociology – Deviance – Part 1 | Social | Video Laurie Scully .net

» Introduction to Sociology – Deviance – Part 1 | Social | Video Laurie Scully .net | Social Deviance | Scoop.it
Introduction to Sociology – Deviance – Part 1 | Social | Video: Tweet  NYU Professor Harvey M... http://t.co/i4Ii6SnjBv LaurieScully-net
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