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The Future of Search May Not Be About Google: It's You In The End Who Will Decide

The Future of Search May Not Be About Google: It's You In The End Who Will Decide | SocialMediaDesign | Scoop.it
There is a evil side of Google which revealed itself in the Filter Bubble, invasion of privacy, the lack of transparency, in the monopoly induction of behavior and especially in what is happening in the search environment.

Via Robin Good
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Stephen Dale's curator insight, January 13, 2014 5:58 AM

People who use Google are given the impression that they are interacting with the data out there, but they are actually interacting with Google and its view of the world.

 

"They are prediction engines that constantly refine a theory about who you are and what you are going to do or want next. Together, they create an universe of data for each one of us."

"In a 2010 paper published in the Scientific American journal, Tim Berners-Lee warned about companies developing ever more “closed” products and “data islands”.

"Morville, in his book Search Patterns, says that the first and second results receive 80% of attention. The vertical approach suggests to the user the idea of a single result that fully answers the question, enclosing possibilities and preventing alternative realization."


Or in other words, is our acceptance of what we see in search results eroding our ability (or willingness) to consider alternatives and employ critical thinking?

Lucy Beaton's curator insight, January 16, 2014 8:21 PM

This is alarming.  We, as Teacher Librarians, need to be aware of the ramifications of this.

Mrs. Dilling's curator insight, February 13, 2014 11:52 AM

My favorite statement, "we must always be aware and well informed about the intentions of companies, and never stop having multiple options for any service."

 

This article was an eye opener for me. I had never questioned Google before.

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Collaborative Curation and Personalization The Future of Museums: A Study Report

Collaborative Curation and Personalization  The Future of Museums: A Study Report | SocialMediaDesign | Scoop.it

This report highlights a number of key trends that will have a significant impact on the user experience and design of future collections and museums.


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Jennifer Ryan's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:04 PM

This is right up my alley. Looking forward to reading about trends and impacts.

Erica Bilder's curator insight, November 15, 2013 7:11 AM

I have nothing to add to Robin Good's terrific insights:

 Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Picture these scenarios:
 

The Victoria & Albert Museum, its collections depleted by massive repatriation, becomes a travel & tourism guide and international affairs ambassador in an increasingly globalized community
 The Freud Museum, in the spirit of its namesake, becomes a provider of mental retreat and therapy (I wonder if the docents will be licensed psychoanalysis?)

These, according to the 40-page report “Museums in a Digital Age” from Arups, may actually be some of the likely new profiles of prestigious museums 25 years from now.  

 

The report projects that:

 

"...future museums will see personalised content, new levels of sustainability and a visitor experience extended beyond present expectations of time and space."

 

A rising desire among audiences to shape their own cultural experiences (“Collaborative Curation”)
 The opportunity for museum to become “curators of experiences” that extend beyond the boundaries of traditional exhibits or programs, or beyond the walls of the museum itself.

 

Source: http://futureofmuseums.blogspot.it/2013/11/museums-in-future-view-from-across-pond.html ;

 The idea of "collaborative curation" of museum collections by the actual users-visitors, is particularly fascinating.  "Just as current consumer trends shift towards collaborative consumption, in the future, museums may employ new patterns of collaborative curation,allowing for individually curated experiences and giving the public greater control over both content and experience.
Increased visitor participation will allow people themselves to reinvent the museum experience, enabling content that can adapt to the preferences of users in real-time." 

 

My comment: If you are a curator and are interested in exploring and understanding what the future of large collections and museums may look like and which forces are going to be driving such changes, this is a good report to read.

 

Insightful. Inspiring 8/10



Original Report: Museums in the Digital Age: 
http://www.arup.com/Publications/Museums_in_the_Digital_Age.aspx ;

 

PDF: http://www.arup.com/~/media/Files/PDF/Publications/Research_and_whitepapers/2013_Arup_FRI_MuseumsintheDigitalAge_final_web.ashx 

 

Amanda Gregorio's curator insight, October 10, 2014 4:36 PM

Interesting notion

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Deep Design Turns Chaos Into Curation: Thomas Goetz [Video]

Thomas Goetz, Executive Editor, WIRED discusses "How to Spot the Future"."

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Robin Good's curator insight, July 5, 2013 2:22 AM


Last year, at the WIRED Business Conference 2012, Thomas Goetz, a Wired executive editor, presented on an interesting topic entitled: How To Spot the Future.


In it, he presented seven rules for identifying the trends, technologies and ideas that will change the world. An activity that Wired editors should supposedly be very good at.


Rule number six in Mr. Goetz presentation is "Demand Deep Design", an elegant way of saying that "curation" and the ability to do so effectively, is and will be a characterizing trait of companies capable of changing the world.


"Stripping away unnecessary info..."

"companies that help us organize our lives..."

"entities that help us understand information"


All these are all easily recognizable traits of those working, directly or indirectly, to help us better manage the large amount of information we are increasingly confronted with.


The ability to do so, is a "design ability", because it encompasses the whole purpose, reason to be and scope of an object, piece of information or tool.


And indeed, it looks like but inevitable (unavoidable), that those individuals and companies who will devise new and better ways to help us manage the info tsunami, will have a fast growing demand coming their way.


"Deep Design turns chaos into curation."


Specific video segment starts at: 8':04"

duration: 1':47"

or go to:

Video URL (specific segment)  : http://fora.tv/2012/05/01/WIRED_Business_Conference_How_to_Spot_the_Future#chapter_08


Download full original video .MP4: http://fora.tv/download?cid=15486&fid=110671&sid=ZeRp3KhvVSYluF0TR1u%2BUeQFrBGtHE6yVaA%2Ff8a1kIc%3D&api=11934220-3fda-11e2-a25f-0800200c9a66

(Duration: 12 min - File size: 49MB)



siobhan-o-flynn's curator insight, July 5, 2013 8:42 AM

Grazie to Robin Good for the excellent summary as always!

 

Robin Good's insight:

 

"Last year, at the WIRED Business Conference 2012, Thomas Goetz, a Wired executive editor, presented on an interesting topic entitled: How To Spot the Future.

 

In it, he presented seven rules for identifying the trends, technologies and ideas that will change the world. An activity that Wired editors should supposedly be very good at.

 

Rule number six in Mr. Goetz presentation is "Demand Deep Design", an elegant way of saying that "curation" and the ability to do so effectively, is and will be a characterizing trait of companies capable of changing the world.

 

"Stripping away unnecessary info..."

"companies that help us organize our lives..."

"entities that help us understand information"..."

 
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The Future of Learning Is All About Curation and Search

 

 


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Robin Good's curator insight, June 4, 2013 1:46 PM



If you are curious to know what I think about curation and search and their future, check out this 3-minute audio excerpt from a much longer interview about curating your experience I had with Joel Zasflosky of ValueofSimple.

In it I highlight how inadequate is to expect Google results to fulfill the need that many people have to learn and deepen their knowledge about a topic they are not familiar with.

Google set of very specific, highly filtered and ranked text results represent many, often relevant, individual bites of a larger puzzle that is never shown.

You are provided tons of individual trees in place of the "forest" you have asked about.

That is the greatest limitation for Google… when it comes the need, not to find a specific book, product, event or person, but for learning, understanding, for seeing the bigger picture, then the individual bites, ranked by Google authority or Pagerank, just don't serve our need.

This is why, just like we can't feed our appetites only with Big Macs, when it comes to learning about a topic we're not familiar with, we will increasingly rely on curated search engines, trusted guides and portals who can provide us with a much better and more useful roadmap into learning than Google can.


Audio excerpt: https://soundcloud.com/user458849/curation-and-search-joel


Full interview: http://valueofsimple.com/smart-and-simple-matters-podcast-023-with-robin-good/ 


MP3 full interview: http://traffic.libsyn.com/valueofsimple/023_SmartAndSimpleMattersPodcastFromValueOfSimple.mp3


Subscribe to iTunes podcast: http://valueofsimple.com/itunes







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Stop Looking for Links: Build WOW Content and Let Users Talk About You

Stop Looking for Links: Build WOW Content and Let Users Talk About You | SocialMediaDesign | Scoop.it

Rand’s recent WBF about co-occurrence was a real wake up call for those still transfixed with link building practices of old.

 

 

 


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Robin Good's curator insight, February 25, 2013 4:28 PM



Simon Penson, founder of Zazzle Media, has a fascinating article on the future of SEO, that I have been wanting to highlight for some time. He argues and provides good supporting reference to the idea that Google is moving away from primarily leveraging links and anchor text to evaluate web site relevance to the use of semantic analysis of text co-occrunces to determine it.

He writes: "Imagine being able to outreach awesome content without having to look for links.

Simply make people aware of what you are doing and get them to talk about you.

It’s how it should be and it would have a profound effect on the type of content you might produce and brand-marketing activity you might pursue."

The article is rich in valuable references and tools for anyone interested in exploring this topic.

Game changing. Resourceful. 8/10

Full article: http://www.seomoz.org/blog/semantic-web-and-link-building-without-links-the-future-for-seo




Justin Bruce's curator insight, February 25, 2013 8:05 PM

From an SEO perspective, google is updating all teh time and reliance on linkbuilding is dangerous as we have just seen with a key client.

 

Google still recommend a link building stratgy but suggest you diversify into PR and social media to build page rank. That means you need to create great content and promote it.

 

From a conversion perspective, great contnet is not enough, it must also be relevant. Look through your email subject matter from your customers over the past year and match this with search queries in analytics (not keywords but actual terms they used to find you) and there's your relevant topic and inspiration. Now you gotta do it daily.

 

Don't forget contributing to other publishers (especially popular and high authority sites) also constitues as content. Curation is fine if relevant (check out scoop.it) but creation is always best, it takes time so allocate time!

 

Pierre Marchildon's curator insight, February 27, 2013 5:28 PM

i agree, but this demands dedication!

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How Social Media Usage Will Change In 2013 | Business 2 Community

How Social Media Usage Will Change In 2013 | Business 2 Community | SocialMediaDesign | Scoop.it
Social media has truly become a daily part of most people's lives, with usage patterns changing dramatically over the past few years.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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The Future Of Content Curation Tools - Part II

The Future Of Content Curation Tools - Part II | SocialMediaDesign | Scoop.it
In the coming months and years, I expect content curation tools are going to play a very important role in many different fields.

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Stephen Dale's curator insight, December 19, 2013 3:51 AM

A useful summary of the current shortcomings in content curation tools and services, and what we features and innovations we might see in this developing market. From the author:

 

"In the near future it is likely that new content curation tools will provide more dedicated features for specific application and uses while becoming more aware of user needs that so far have not been taken into serious consideration (attribution, archiving, monetizing).

While large content curation hubs and platforms are likely to start realizing that their best value yet to be extracted is in the content being curated by their users, new tools will likely target more specific and professional uses rather than the general public needing simply to collect and repost content on their blog or social media channel."


Link to the full article: http://www.masternewmedia.org/content-curation-tools-future-part2/#ixzz2nuOEQZag

Marirosa Del Po's curator insight, January 3, 2014 12:05 PM

Seconda e ultima parte (in inglese) dell'articolo di Robin Good sugli strumenti della Content Curation.

SMOOC's curator insight, February 20, 2014 1:27 PM

Interesting write up on content curation tools from Robin Good (pt. 2)

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Why Crowdsourcing Future Is Moving To Curation, Synthesis and Things

Why Crowdsourcing Future Is Moving To Curation, Synthesis and Things | SocialMediaDesign | Scoop.it

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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, November 16, 2013 8:13 AM

Great one.

Olinda Turner's curator insight, November 20, 2013 5:57 PM

Although directed at content marketing, these ideas translate into technical communications where users are trying to help each other find the best technical content. I totally agree that the fundamental way in which we communicate through content is shifting.

irene's curator insight, January 10, 2014 9:16 AM

Perché il futuro del Crowdsourcing va in direzione della cura, sintesi e cose varie.

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Why Google, Yahoo and Others Are Making You Think RSS Is Dead: Lockdown

Why Google, Yahoo and Others Are Making You Think RSS Is Dead: Lockdown | SocialMediaDesign | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's curator insight, July 4, 2013 7:19 AM


Marco Arment the creator of Instapaper, has an excellent and provocative piece on why Google is closing down all of its RSS appendages (they just closed also the RSS feeds in Google Alerts) and the logic behind this strategy.


He writes: "Officially, Google killed Reader because “over the years usage has declined”.1 I believe that statement, especially if API clients weren’t considered “usage”, but I don’t believe that’s the entire reason.

The most common assumption I’ve seen others cite is that “Google couldn’t figure out how to monetize Reader,” or other variants about direct profitability. I don’t believe this, either. Google Reader’s operational costs likely paled in comparison to many of their other projects that don’t bring in major revenue, and I’ve heard from multiple sources that it effectively had a staff of zero for years. It was just running, quietly serving a vital role for a lot of people."


"The bigger problem is that they’ve abandoned interoperability. RSS, semantic markup, microformats, and open APIs all enable interoperability, but the big players don’t want that — they want to lock you in, shut out competitors, and make a service so proprietary that even if you could get your data out, it would be either useless (no alternatives to import into) or cripplingly lonely (empty social networks).


Google resisted this trend admirably for a long time and was very geek- and standards-friendly, but not since Facebook got huge enough to effectively redefine the internet and refocus Google’s plans to be all-Google+, all the time.4"


Provides better perspective on RSS, Google, FB and Twitter and your future relationship with RSS.



Must-read article. 9/10


Full article: http://www.marco.org/2013/07/03/lockdown


(Image credit - RSS logo - Shutterstock)



Ashish Rishi's curator insight, July 4, 2013 11:49 PM

Love you Marco!!!  Agreed  and couldn't have asked for more. Internet to me was the ultimate democratization tool , a leveler, a ground playing field that challenged all institutions that had unnecessary walls around them - say educational institutions , you loved them, but they were for a fortunate few. Internet platforms  ( including google) were formed for the love of internet, they have milked it enough and why not ? but now these guys are trying to become to old school walled gardens, I just hope that in doing so , they don't lose the charm that defines them.

Laura Brown's comment, July 6, 2013 2:43 PM
This is like the AOL model of the Internet which they offered years ago. People thought they were online but they were only online via AOL which mean AOL controlled what they say, how they saw it, etc. Many people were fine with the AOL version of the Internet. People who just wanted to look at email and use chat forums for personal reason and put up a personal home page, etc. However, the people who did not like being restricted or confined choose to opt out of AOL and use other ISP's (Internet Service Providers). I'm not surprised Google wants to take several steps back and go that way, take control of what people are allowed to see and make sure the ads are featured versus having the option to block them. They have already gone several steps backwards in bringing back pop up ads. No one seems to protest those, or the video and other bulky ads which take up a lot of bandwidth. People had a large voice against all that when it was still the artists, scientists and other geeks who ruled online. Now it is the marketers and the Internet reflects the change in a big way. It's like one big ad soup. Google just wants to tie it all up in a neat bundle.
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Is Google the Killer of Newspaper Print Ad Sales?

Is Google the Killer of Newspaper Print Ad Sales? | SocialMediaDesign | Scoop.it
The U.S. newspaper industry has lost more than $40 billion in ad revenue in the past decade — over half of that in the last four years alone — and Google’s ad revenues are now more than twice what the industry pulls in.

Via Robin Good
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jalp Internet Consulting Services's comment, April 19, 2013 7:25 AM
Google transformed advs and made them accesible to SME's. So low budget marketing departments can act more easily, even if they run their campain through agances.
Guillaume Decugis's comment, April 22, 2013 11:33 AM
@Jalp: good point and an essential reason that drove this change. Not just attention but lowering the barrier to entry. Thanks!
Kitty A. Smith's comment, May 6, 2013 2:37 PM
People are always looking to place fault. Things change when something better comes along. Just because newspapers were first doesn't mean they are best. Tobacco knows time is limited, that would explain why they bought Kraft Foods!
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Social Media Practices to Expect in 2013

Social Media Practices to Expect in 2013 | SocialMediaDesign | Scoop.it

Social media has rapidly become an important part of many peoples’ lives, not just as a way to keep up with friends and family, but also for professional networks, exploring fields of research, shopping, sharing content and fostering online communities.


It has also become a crucial aspect of a businesses’ online presence- now a firm can connect with consumers and tailor their online relationships with customers, other brands, and with employees.
Predicting quite what is going to happen in this ever changing digital landscape isn’t easy, but it’s certainly worth noting some of the rising trends and having a look ahead to 2013.


Learn more about these trends, including social marketing, content development, branding, video + media applications, social tv, and the growing influence of mobile devices in social media...


Via Lauren Moss, Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com, Martin (Marty) Smith
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Eliza Steely's comment, December 13, 2012 12:57 PM
I love that point Martin! I think people call it social because of the personal element to it as opposed to advertising and things like that, especially because it's so interactive in nature. Do you have a suggestion as to what to change the name to?
ThePinkSalmon's comment, December 13, 2012 11:44 PM
Very good indeed!
donhornsby's curator insight, December 14, 2012 6:23 AM

(From the article): "The coming year will see a massive increase in companies using social media services to market their goods and services, recognising the potential for sharing content and information and enhancing engagement with target audiences."