Social Studies Resources (Wichita State)
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Social Studies Resources (Wichita State)
Resources for social studies educators.
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15 Lesson Plans For Making Students Better Online Researchers - Edudemic

15 Lesson Plans For Making Students Better Online Researchers - Edudemic | Social Studies Resources (Wichita State) | Scoop.it
15 Lesson Plans For Making Students Better Online Researchers - Edudemic
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Jessie Daniel Ames and the Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching, 1930-1942 | US History Scene

Jessie Daniel Ames and the Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching, 1930-1942 | US History Scene | Social Studies Resources (Wichita State) | Scoop.it

The successful eradication of lynching as a socially acceptable tool of terror stems largely from the the Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching (ASWPL) between 1930 - 1942.


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The Music and History of Our Times | The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History

The Music and History of Our Times | The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History | Social Studies Resources (Wichita State) | Scoop.it

Gilder Lehrman has many amazing resources... like these free songs!:

U.S. Hist: The Music and History of Our Times- articles and playlists on music from WWII to 9-11: http://t.co/Uynvu9Be...


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Sociology: Mapping American Stereotypes

Sociology: Mapping American Stereotypes | Social Studies Resources (Wichita State) | Scoop.it

I can't verify the research, but it could foster an interesting debate in a sociology class - DK:

 

There are plenty of regional biases about other places.  This map was generated by Google autocomplete.  If you Google, "Why is Rhode Island so...." if will automatically suggest some responses.  This was done for all the states and these autoresponses are quite revealing (and often humorous). 


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 2, 2012 9:59 PM
I find it funny that from state to state the same adjectives are being used over and over again. For example: "so boring," "so humid," and "so liberal." As much as there are stereotypes for each region, we share the same qualities as a union, for the most part.
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Cities with a "Million" People

Cities with a "Million" People | Social Studies Resources (Wichita State) | Scoop.it

From TD-architects Theo Deutinger Rotterdam.

 

Rome was the first city with one million residents, with that occuring in 5 BC.  Over a thousand years later, London and Beijing joined that group as industrialization became the impetus for wide-scale urbanization.  Today we are seeing an explosion of "million cities" throughout the world. 


Tags: urban, megacities, unit 7 cities.




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Seth Dixon's comment, September 21, 2012 1:51 PM
The data is from 2006, so it's a little dated, but still useful.
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OK Hist: Vikings (in Oklahoma?)

OK Hist: Vikings (in Oklahoma?) | Social Studies Resources (Wichita State) | Scoop.it

From around 800 to 1100 A.D., bands of Scandinavian seafaring warriors known as the Vikings raided and settled in vast areas of eastern and western Europe.  Over the next three centuries, they would leave their mark on much of Britain and the European continent, as well as parts of modern-day Russia, Iceland, Greenland and Newfoundland.

 

Some historians have argued that the Vikings physical pressence within North America includes expeditions into the continent's enterior (runestones found in Minnesota and Oklahoma).


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U.S. History: Structure found in Md. may be linked to man who inspired 'Uncle Tom's Cabin'

U.S. History: Structure found in Md. may be linked to man who inspired 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' | Social Studies Resources (Wichita State) | Scoop.it

Why does this just seem crazy to me?!? - DK

 

Archaeologists have discovered what they think are remains of a barn or blacksmith workshop in North Bethesda that could date to the days of Josiah Henson, a former slave whose autobiography inspired the novel "Uncle Tom's Cabin." (Possible link to...


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