Social Studies Education
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T-Shirt Travels

When filmmaker Shantha Bloemen was stationed in a remote village in Zambia as a worker with an international aid organization, she had to adjust to living in a different culture. But one thing struck her as oddly familiar: almost everyone in the village wore secondhand clothing from the West. Bloemen began to imagine stories about the people who used to wear the clothing, wondering if the original owners had any idea that the castoffs they had given to charities ended up being sold to Africans half a world away.


Via Seth Dixon
Kristen McDaniel's insight:

It's fascinating to look at the effects of globalization, and a great look at how economies change.  When people in the Western world drop a bag of clothes off at a charity, I doubt we think they'd end up in a village in Africa. Warning:  it does get a little preachy at the end. 

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 13, 2013 12:52 AM

I saw old coats in parts of India , .

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:44 PM

Is direct aid a good thing or not? How does secondhand clothing impact local economies?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:57 PM

Westernization is a popular theme thats happening in the East. Even though people don't know it, the clothes they give away may be some that are taken to places like Africa. Hand-me-downs are popular in the U.S. but even more so in Africa. The t-shirt you give away to someone might end up across the world. Who knows.

Social Studies Education
Looking for new and exciting resources for social studies educators.  Resources found here are not endorsed by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.
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What’s Happening at the Oroville Dam?

What’s Happening at the Oroville Dam? | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
UNITED STATES The damaged California dam is in the spotlight now, but it’s not alone among the facilities needing upgrades. (Nat Geo News) Why do we have dams? Use our resources to better understand. Teachers, scroll down for a quick list of key resources in our Teachers Toolkit, including today’s MapMaker Interactive map. Discussion Ideas…
Kristen McDaniel's insight:
Great blog from Nat Geo not only on the potential failure at Oroville Dam, but national infrastructure, severe weather changes, and solutions.  
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Researchers uncover vast numbers of unknown Nazi killing fields

Researchers uncover vast numbers of unknown Nazi killing fields | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
The 'Encyclopedia of Camps and Ghettos,' set for completion in 2025, has now documented 42,500 sites of Nazi persecution -- over eight times more than predicted. And the number keeps on rising
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Cool Tools Are Fun, But Learning Should Come First

Cool Tools Are Fun, But Learning Should Come First | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Some teachers can get caught up in the latest ed- tech resources and forget to prioritize educational value above all else.
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How Students Critiquing One Another’s Work Raises The Quality Bar

How Students Critiquing One Another’s Work Raises The Quality Bar | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
When students practice giving kind, specific and helpful feedback on each other's work, they learn the value of revision and define for themselves what quality
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Why Reconstruction Matters After this Election

Why Reconstruction Matters After this Election | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Understanding the history of the Reconstruction era can help students make sense of current events after the most recent presidential election.
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Rich Web Resources to Raise Cultural Awareness

Rich Web Resources to Raise Cultural Awareness | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Curtis Chandler looks at how educators can help students become more aware, understanding and appreciative of other kids and cultures, using rich web resources.
Kristen McDaniel's insight:
Another great article from MiddleWeb - this one on using the internet to raise cultural awareness.  I love the comparison of pictures on ancient Egypt, having students look at the foci of each - and then finding current examples, and even an Egyptian student.  
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Confronting Racist Objects

Confronting Racist Objects | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Millions of racist objects sit in the homes of everyday Americans. Here are some of your stories about reconciling, reclaiming and reinterpreting them.
Kristen McDaniel's insight:
This is a really interesting article looking at - what do we do with racist objects and memorabilia?  Incredibly thought-provoking.
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How (Almost) Everyone Failed to Prepare for Pearl Harbor

How (Almost) Everyone Failed to Prepare for Pearl Harbor | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
UNITED STATES The attack on Pearl Harbor, 75 years ago this week, was the worst day in the U.S. Navy’s history and the shock of a lifetime for just about any American who had achieved the age of memory.
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11 Facts About Food Deserts

11 Facts About Food Deserts | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it

"Food insecurity has a high correlation with increased diabetes rates. In Chicago, the death rate from diabetes in a food desert is twice that of areas with access to grocery stores."


Via Seth Dixon
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Harley Bass's curator insight, January 10, 3:11 PM

This article is connected to human geography by agriculture. We talk and learn about agriculture every day in the class room. I feel like this article is a eye opener to the naive mind of people who do not live in or around food desert areas.

Hailey Austin's curator insight, January 10, 3:22 PM
This is connected to my class because its dealing with agriculture and how they have limited crops. So most of there food is manufactured and unhealthy. I think that food deserts should either be shut down or given better food options.In Chicago, the death rate from diabetes in a food desert is twice that of an area with access to a grocery store.
Mitchell Tasso's curator insight, January 11, 8:57 PM

This article/scoop is very intriguing and cool to read. It goes along with the topic of agriculture and describes the 11 facts that it bares about food deserts whether those facts are good or bad. Overall, I liked this scoop because of the 11 facts and the detail that was provided with them.

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What Does "Informed Citizen" Mean Right Now | iCivics

What Does "Informed Citizen" Mean Right Now | iCivics | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
What Does "Informed Citizen" Mean Right Now @louise_dube
https://t.co/9aDA4e1m6f
.@AFTunion #edchat via @icivics https://t.co/VLVpndzoYY
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Mobile Apps from the Library of Congress | Library of Congress

Mobile Apps from the Library of Congress | Library of Congress | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
National Book Festival Come to Washington, D.C. on Sept. 24, 2016, for the 16th annual National Book Festival at the Washington Convention Center, 8:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.: More than 100 authors & dozens of special activities for the entire family.
Kristen McDaniel's insight:
Wow!  Who knew the LOC had so many great apps?
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Putting Democracy Back into Public Education

Putting Democracy Back into Public Education | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Throughout U.S. history, Americans have pivoted between whether the central priority of public education should be to create skilled workers for the econom
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Civics Education Failed to Instill Democratic Values in Students

Civics Education Failed to Instill Democratic Values in Students | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
America’s classrooms are responsible for preparing students to be good citizens. This election indicates that they may be failing to do so.
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Are We Covering or Are Students Discovering?

Are We Covering or Are Students Discovering? | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Rather than "covering" a curriculum with instruction driven by a textbook, the authors advocate planning lessons that focus on big ideas & student understanding
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Visualizing Emancipation

Visualizing Emancipation | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Visualizing Emancipation is an ongoing mapping project, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, that sheds light on when and where men and women became free in the Civil War South. It tells the complex story of emancipation by mapping documentary evidence of black men and women's activities--using official military correspondence, newspapers, and wartime letters and diaries--alongside the movements of Union regiments and the shifting legal status of slavery.
Kristen McDaniel's insight:
Interactive map of documentary evidence of slavery emancipation.
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Why schools have stopped teaching American history

Why schools have stopped teaching American history | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
"Don’t know much about history . . ." goes the famous song. It’s an apt motto for the Common Core’s elementary-school curriculum.

And it’s becoming a serious problem.

A 2014 report by the National Assessment of Educational Progress showed that an abysmal 18 percent of American high-school kids were proficient in US history. When colleges such as Stanford decline to require Western Civilization classes or high schools propose changing their curriculum so that history is taught only from 1877 onward (this happened in North Carolina), it’s merely a blip in our news cycle.

A 2012 story in Perspectives on History magazine by University of North Carolina professor Bruce VanSledright found that 88 percent of elementary-school teachers considered teaching history to be a low priority.

The reasons are varied. VanSledright found that teachers didn’t focus on history because the students aren’t tested on it at the state level. Why teach something you can’t test?

A teacher I spoke with in Brooklyn confirmed this. She said, “all the pressure in lower grades is in math and English Language Arts because of the state tests and the weight that they carry.”

She teaches fourth grade and says that age is the first time students are taught about explorers, American settlers, the American Revolution and so on. But why so late?

VanSledright also found that teachers just didn’t know enough history to teach it. He wrote there was some “holiday curriculum as history instruction,” but that was it.

Arthur, a father in Brooklyn whose kids are in first and second grade at what’s considered an excellent public school, says that’s the only kind of history lesson he’s seen. And even that’s been thin. His second-grade daughter knows George Washington was the first president but not why Abraham Lincoln is famous.

As the parent of a first-grader, I’ve also seen even the “holiday curriculum” in short supply. First grade might seem young, but it’s my daughter’s third year in the New York City public-school system after pre-K and kindergarten. She goes to one of the finest public schools in the city, yet knows about George Washington exclusively from the soundtrack of the Broadway show “Hamilton.” She wouldn’t be able to tell you who discovered America.

So far, she has encountered no mention of any historical figure except for Martin Luther King Jr. This isn’t a knock on King, obviously. He’s a hero in our house. But he can’t be the sum total of historical figures our kids learn about in even early elementary school.

For one thing, how do we tell King’s story without telling the story of the Founding Fathers, the Constitution or of Abraham Lincoln? King’s protests were effective because they were grounded in the idea that America was supposed to be something specific, that the Constitution said so — and that we weren’t living up to those ideals.

The Brooklyn teacher I spoke with says instructors balk when it comes to history: They don’t want to offend anyone. “The more vocal and involved the parents are, the more likely the teacher will feel uncomfortable to teach certain things or say something that might create a problem.” Which leaves . . . Martin Luther King.

She cited issues around Thanksgiving, like teaching the story of pilgrims and the Native Americans breaking bread together as one teachers might sideline for fear of parents complaining. Instead of addressing sticky subjects, we skip them altogether.

As colleges around the country see protests to remove Thomas Jefferson’s statues from their campuses, it’s becoming the norm to erase the parts of history that we find uncomfortable. It’s not difficult to teach children that the pilgrims or Thomas Jefferson were imperfect yet still responsible for so much that is good in America.

Jay Leno used to do a segment on his show called “JayWalking,” where he’d come up to people on the street and ask them what should’ve been easy historical questions. That their responses were funny and cringeworthy enough to get them on the show tells you how well it went.

Leno never asked the year the Magna Carta was published or when North Dakota became a state. He would ask what country we fought in the Revolutionary War, to name the current vice president or how many stars are on the American flag. And yet adults had no idea.

We talk often about how fractured our country has become. That our division increases while school kids are taught less and less about our shared history should come as no surprise.
Kristen McDaniel's insight:
Outlines the loss of elementary social studies.  What effects are we seeing?  
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Battling Fake News in the Classroom

Battling Fake News in the Classroom | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
See how one educator helps students develop media literacy—a critical 21st-century skill.
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Another thought-provoking article on fake news and the role of social studies.
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Reading Like a Historian: Re-Assessing Reliability

Reading Like a Historian: Re-Assessing Reliability | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
When analyzing historical documents, students need to be able to effectively reassess the reliability of their sources. Learn how teachers can effectively teach when and how to reassess the reliability of a source.
Kristen McDaniel's insight:
Fantastic (short) video of a teacher in action, working with students on reliability of resources.  
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Fake news is why you exist. And 12 tools that can help

Fake news is why you exist. And 12 tools that can help | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Okay. Basic question. "If I asked you to describe what you do every day as a social studies teacher, what would I hear?" Let me rephrase that a bit. "If I asked you to describe what you should be doing every day as a social studies teacher, what would I hear?" Here's my point. I…
Kristen McDaniel's insight:
Interesting blog post from Glenn at HistoryTech - and some great resources!
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Fake Or Real? How To Self-Check The News And Get The Facts

Fake Or Real? How To Self-Check The News And Get The Facts | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Your friend shares a story on Facebook. You read the headline and you think it's too good to be true, but it looks like it's from a news site. Experts offer tips to help you sniff out fact from fake.
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Earlier and more often: Washington teachers seek broad boost to civics education

Earlier and more often: Washington teachers seek broad boost to civics education | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
Fake news sites are only the latest trend prompting teachers to join a statewide effort aimed at educating students about how to engage with government.
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Where the country is becoming more diverse

Where the country is becoming more diverse | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
The racial and ethnic diversity of communities varies greatly across the country, but rapid change is coming to many of the least-diverse areas.
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Questions for: ‘Fidel Castro, Cuban Revolutionary Who Defied U.S., Dies at 90’

Questions for: ‘Fidel Castro, Cuban Revolutionary Who Defied U.S., Dies at 90’ | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
How did Fidel Castro act on his belief that he was the messiah of his fatherland?
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What We Can Learn When an Archaeologist Writes a History of the Turning Point in the American Revolution

What We Can Learn When an Archaeologist Writes a History of the Turning Point in the American Revolution | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
What We Can Learn When an Archaeologist Writes a History of the Turning Point in the American Revolution #sschat https://t.co/Truo9w80MI
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A really interesting look at what "historical writing" means.  
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Between the Lines: Why Civic Education Matters | iCivics

Between the Lines: Why Civic Education Matters | iCivics | Social Studies Education | Scoop.it
RT @icivics: Between the Lines: Why Civic Education Matters
https://t.co/Ga7Vi0QKM2
#sschat #edchat https://t.co/jpZaA73zlc
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